16

You're absolutely right assuming that your problem has very close relation to the problem of different time zones. So the answer would be much like the answer to the other question. Here are some ideas I found useful for myself, but YMMV, as usual: Combine There's no silver bullet. Phone, email, and instant messengers co-exist specifically because they ...


16

Your client is a person, too. They have been late or missed deadlines at some point in their life as well. Unless you have a really aggressive client, they should understand that things happen. And if they are extremely upset about it.. they might not be the type of client you wan to keep around. I take a very relaxed approach to communicating with clients. ...


13

If your reply is simply "I'm overloaded with work [... etc]", should it really take two days to send out? As a (part-time) freelancer, I don't have the problem of being overloaded with freelance work (not yet!), but when coupled with all of my other responsibilities, it does get demanding. I will say though that when I'm on the other end and hire ...


12

As you go in for larger and higher-paying consulting projects, trust becomes increasingly more important. Larger projects often start out with a phone interview, and if you do well there, the next question is often, "how soon can we fly you out to meet our team?". It's possible to land some large projects without in-person meetings, but rarely without some ...


11

I have terminated a few contracts and I have always agonized about it. However, termination goes smoothly because the client usually hasn't gone through the mental anguish over the project that I have. They usually are pretty calm and professional about it, despite whatever shenanigans happened during the project. I always use the timeline as a reason for ...


10

If you need to cut them as a client, you need to do it sooner rather then later. Doing it later lets the problem build and build, and you carry more emotional weight when you finally do it. If it was a small problem brewing from a while ago, I'd talk to them about it, and possibly try to salvage the relationship. It sounds like you tried (showing proof, ...


10

It is your freelance business, and if you prefer written communication to voice communication, it is okay to make that choice. I prefer email to phone conversations, and I have been freelancing for > 10 years. That being said, I do occasionally speak to my clients. Here are some observations: 90% of my communication is via email with my clients. I have been ...


10

In your Scope of Work contract, you should always have a clause about unforeseen circumstances that could introduce delays. I come from the IT Services industry, and that is one thing we always mention: The absolute minimum completion time/date, and the potential end time/date, for anything that may come up. I get to deal with almost a thousand clients ...


10

Since you are training yourself as a freelancer, you are also training yourself as a project manager, finance manager, negotiator and boss. Freelancing is just a group name for 5-6 roles (I think that once a guy told me that I am doing the work for 6 men). So besides training your coding skills, you'll have to train other skills as well. One of them is ...


10

When someone needs a website, in most of the cases, they have no idea that there is a designer and a developer, or someone who can do both things, they just look for "someone who builds my good looking and functional website", without making much difference between web design or web development. They are completely unaware of your skills, they don't even ...


9

First you say this: He told me he was glad to have had the interview because he ended quite happy whith me. Nevertheless there were still four more interviews and he had to finish them all. I hate to break the news to you, but I am fairly confident he said that to each candidate. A week later he sent me an email telling me I wasn't hired. And ...


9

I'd send them an email with something along the lines of: You can reach me by email at X, or by phone between the hours of Y and Z. If this is not satisfactory, then I will not be able to do business with you. And possibly add that section on acceptable communication methods/times to any future contracts you do on the side.


8

There is nothing wrong with explaining to a client that Skype (or phone calls) are not sufficient and you need to have written approval of something either via email, fax, or postal mail. I would wait until you have a clear, written, approval of terms.


8

she still owes me for the work I've done How long has she owed you and how much? If she's past due on a payment, or owes you thousands, that could be enough reason to stop right there. But should I refund her any money because I'm quitting? Not unless you had a formal agreement to do work that you haven't already done, or she paid you for work you haven'...


8

Usually I work on a testing server that is not the final destination of the site. Once the client approve (by email is better but also verbally if it is a trusted client) the copy on the testing server, I move the site to the main domain publishing it. From this moment I consider the work finished. I also state that process in my contract. This also saves ...


7

I would start off as you have by emailing in the first instance. It allows you to set out your offering clearly in a passive manner to begin with. If you haven't heard back after 48 hours, I would then follow up with a phone call. The advantages that I have found with this approach are that: The client has hopefully read your initial email and if not, you ...


7

Your client should know that you are in a different time zone and he should be well aware that you have your working hours and they have theirs. If you have a short time-frame where both of you are "awake", you may agree to use this for synchronous communication (e.g. by phone or real-time chat). Rest of the time, you may communicate via email and the ...


7

First off, communication is key; you state you already told them about it, just re-affirm with them. When you do, have your exit plan ready. I'm sorry I can't continue with the project as scheduled; given the events leading up this this, I can't work on it as much as promised. I can recommend Mr X of Super Y Agency to help you accomplish the remaining ...


7

I would have to say that this is an opinion based question and there is no right or wrong answer. My answer is based on my desire to do the right thing for my clients. I would say yes, but to a point. Perhaps this is a bug that was in your application? Whether the project was fixed bid or hourly, it is your responsibility to deliver a working application. ...


7

One approach I've used in the past is to simply tell customers that I no longer provide this service at an hourly rate, but that I could provide ongoing support on a flat rate monthly basis. Then I explained what this new service includes. In my case, I offered a guaranteed response time of X days, bug fixes, and priority service whereby I drop other non-...


7

Well this is really opinion-based. But there are some aspects to be aware of. Some clients will see your failure to invoice as an "ok" to send you more changes then act shocked when you want to be paid. For this reason you need to be a bit careful with free services. Clients like this just try and roll over you and then start becoming very difficult when ...


6

In general prompt communication is a good thing. You should let your client know as soon as possible what the problems are so that if chances need to be made to the work plan/scope of work, they can de done in a way you both can live with. Maybe they will decide it is too much trouble and pay you for work done. Maybe they will decide they want to expand ...


6

Unless the client made assurances to be immediately contactable during this period, they have no urgent need to respond. There are anumber of things that might be diverting their attention. I would suggest allowing at least 72 hours before following up.


5

In important meetings, I won't use chat. I personally have trouble taking people seriously who only want to communicate purely over chat. Sure, chat is great for collaborating. It allows introverted people to be able to focus and then address the other party when he/she gets to a stopping point. When I'm programming, chat is awesome and is my preferred ...


5

I have been in similar situations where clients won't listen to sensible advice. One approach is to accept that the customer is always right and proceed with whatever they instruct. Under these circumstances, you might like to consider: not including a link back to your website (if the website could affect your reputation) seeking an up-front payment (if ...


5

I think you should put limits on the explaining you do. If a customer does not value your service for what it is, you will run into trouble and discussions later on. If you are a new freelancer there is always the temptation to take every customer you can but sometimes it isn't worth it. I speak out of plenty of experience, unfortunately. That being said, ...


5

Don't be a guy with no projects. Projects don't have to be paid ones. Have you created projects during the learning phase? You must have had so put those into portfolio. Also create a few more projects with that skill and put in the portfolio. Clients don't care much if you had paid projects. They need to see projects to see what your skill are.


5

I used to run into the same problem. It happened for two reasons. I worked with the wrong types of clients I allowed it to happen If you're picking "bottom of the barrel" clients that pay very little money, they have very little to loose. They also tend to be the most demanding and/or difficult clients. They don't care if it takes a week or year because ...


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