14

Since you are training yourself as a freelancer, you are also training yourself as a project manager, finance manager, negotiator and boss. Freelancing is just a group name for 5-6 roles (I think that once a guy told me that I am doing the work for 6 men). So besides training your coding skills, you'll have to train other skills as well. One of them is ...


13

If your reply is simply "I'm overloaded with work [... etc]", should it really take two days to send out? As a (part-time) freelancer, I don't have the problem of being overloaded with freelance work (not yet!), but when coupled with all of my other responsibilities, it does get demanding. I will say though that when I'm on the other end and hire ...


11

I have terminated a few contracts and I have always agonized about it. However, termination goes smoothly because the client usually hasn't gone through the mental anguish over the project that I have. They usually are pretty calm and professional about it, despite whatever shenanigans happened during the project. I always use the timeline as a reason for ...


10

If you need to cut them as a client, you need to do it sooner rather then later. Doing it later lets the problem build and build, and you carry more emotional weight when you finally do it. If it was a small problem brewing from a while ago, I'd talk to them about it, and possibly try to salvage the relationship. It sounds like you tried (showing proof, ...


10

I'd send them an email with something along the lines of: You can reach me by email at X, or by phone between the hours of Y and Z. If this is not satisfactory, then I will not be able to do business with you. And possibly add that section on acceptable communication methods/times to any future contracts you do on the side.


10

When someone needs a website, in most of the cases, they have no idea that there is a designer and a developer, or someone who can do both things, they just look for "someone who builds my good looking and functional website", without making much difference between web design or web development. They are completely unaware of your skills, they don't even ...


9

First you say this: He told me he was glad to have had the interview because he ended quite happy whith me. Nevertheless there were still four more interviews and he had to finish them all. I hate to break the news to you, but I am fairly confident he said that to each candidate. A week later he sent me an email telling me I wasn't hired. And ...


9

she still owes me for the work I've done How long has she owed you and how much? If she's past due on a payment, or owes you thousands, that could be enough reason to stop right there. But should I refund her any money because I'm quitting? Not unless you had a formal agreement to do work that you haven't already done, or she paid you for work you haven'...


7

There is nothing wrong with explaining to a client that Skype (or phone calls) are not sufficient and you need to have written approval of something either via email, fax, or postal mail. I would wait until you have a clear, written, approval of terms.


7

I would have to say that this is an opinion based question and there is no right or wrong answer. My answer is based on my desire to do the right thing for my clients. I would say yes, but to a point. Perhaps this is a bug that was in your application? Whether the project was fixed bid or hourly, it is your responsibility to deliver a working application. ...


7

One approach I've used in the past is to simply tell customers that I no longer provide this service at an hourly rate, but that I could provide ongoing support on a flat rate monthly basis. Then I explained what this new service includes. In my case, I offered a guaranteed response time of X days, bug fixes, and priority service whereby I drop other non-...


7

Well this is really opinion-based. But there are some aspects to be aware of. Some clients will see your failure to invoice as an "ok" to send you more changes then act shocked when you want to be paid. For this reason you need to be a bit careful with free services. Clients like this just try and roll over you and then start becoming very difficult when ...


7

Usually I work on a testing server that is not the final destination of the site. Once the client approve (by email is better but also verbally if it is a trusted client) the copy on the testing server, I move the site to the main domain publishing it. From this moment I consider the work finished. I also state that process in my contract. This also saves ...


7

In short, the answer is 'no', it's certainly not inappropriate to advertise potential vacancies on your linkedin page, but you need to understand that at that point you're basically moonlighting as a stunted recruiter, passing suitable candidates along to other recruiters who claim that they'll pay you a small finder's-fee for helping them to place a ...


6

First off, communication is key; you state you already told them about it, just re-affirm with them. When you do, have your exit plan ready. I'm sorry I can't continue with the project as scheduled; given the events leading up this this, I can't work on it as much as promised. I can recommend Mr X of Super Y Agency to help you accomplish the remaining ...


6

Here's my opinion and practice.... I never respond or contact clients during any time I want to myself, ever. That is to say.. I don't respond to or contact clients before 9am, after 5pm, on weekends or on holidays - even if I happen to be working. If I get an email from a client at 6pm Friday night.. I do not respond until 9 am Monday at the earliest. I ...


5

I think you should put limits on the explaining you do. If a customer does not value your service for what it is, you will run into trouble and discussions later on. If you are a new freelancer there is always the temptation to take every customer you can but sometimes it isn't worth it. I speak out of plenty of experience, unfortunately. That being said, ...


5

I have been in similar situations where clients won't listen to sensible advice. One approach is to accept that the customer is always right and proceed with whatever they instruct. Under these circumstances, you might like to consider: not including a link back to your website (if the website could affect your reputation) seeking an up-front payment (if ...


5

Don't be a guy with no projects. Projects don't have to be paid ones. Have you created projects during the learning phase? You must have had so put those into portfolio. Also create a few more projects with that skill and put in the portfolio. Clients don't care much if you had paid projects. They need to see projects to see what your skill are.


5

I used to run into the same problem. It happened for two reasons. I worked with the wrong types of clients I allowed it to happen If you're picking "bottom of the barrel" clients that pay very little money, they have very little to loose. They also tend to be the most demanding and/or difficult clients. They don't care if it takes a week or year because ...


5

From what you have said it sounds like they haven't decided to use your services for their project yet, but they wanted your contact information should they choose to use your services. Now that you have sent them your Skype information here is what you should do. Set yourself working time every day that you are willing to work. This will show that you ...


5

I agree with the others that it would be imprudent to say something overtly negative about Bob. Though you might be able to get the client to realize by asking "innocent" sounding questions "Why did you and Bob decide to skip XXX?" "Is there room in the budget for rebuilding XYZ because we went did ABC?" etc. If you can get this over quickly, you might ...


5

No one mentioned that blackmailing freelancers for extra work out of scope is explicitly forbidden in the terms of service for most of these sites. Read the terms of service. Elance, for example, says clients may not threaten a bad review to extort free work from the freelancer. If you contact support with proof, the client is busted, they will get in big ...


5

Personally, when I have a contractual agreement with a company, signed from the legal representative of the whole company as a single entity, I assume that every request coming from it is regulated in the contract. So for every call and request that comes from any company office I assume that the caller asked to the boss or the supervisor for permission ...


5

I hate and decline all project instructions over call as well. I simply tell them something like "In a call, we can discuss plans and ideas at the very high level. However, if you need to explain any feature or your request or you need to clarify something, I prefer in writing so I don't have to retype everything we talked about." Be determined with this ...


5

Is it moral and professional? No! Do people do this (including large companies)? Yes. I can't say I never done it without client's knowledge, but each time I get into trouble as I have to act as a middle man and cannot connect client and my friend directly. So after few such experiences, I started hiring people for project-wide contract. I pay them ...


5

He says that he wants me and his design team to work together and our agreement was only for programming, not for design (he would provide the flow and images). This implies a change of project scope. If he is talking about a single day, then I suggest you consider a separate invoice for your time - apply a discount since some of your time is paid under ...


5

Get your money, and run. That's all you can do. Sometimes you have to allow people to fall on their faces before they can realize that there's this neat thing called gravity.


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