Hot answers tagged

21

I am currently in the process of becoming a digital nomad myself. I have been investigating this for a few months now. You must sort out a few things Earn money: Ideally, you want several income streams to reduce risks. Legal status: you want to make sure this is sorted out as without that you probably will have trouble charging anyone for your services. ...


18

If you do not know how to build an iOS app... How in the world do you know how long it will take you to learn how build one? How would you know how long actually building the app would take? How would you know how long it will take to become familiar and comfortable with security issues? How long to construct and implement Updates? How would you know ...


8

Why the are not choosing you? The reasons may be: They prefer working with some in the USA. In case things go bad, they can always sue USA contractor. USA contractors are also aware of this. Price of the project - large project are usually not being subcontracted outside USA Remote workers are unreliable. I heard this sentence from many clients who tried ...


7

Warning If anyone asked me to use such a framework, I would give the lead some serious second thoughts. If the customer has the time to micromanage me or look through such footage, they have focused on the wrong things (huge red flag project-wise). I have experience with this as an employee (call center environment) and it never ends well. What is ...


7

In my experience, clients who I've done contract work for haven't asked for this until the end of the fiscal year, when their accountant starts pressing them to get their taxes in order. My experience comes from dealing with small startups, where there's not a lot of process in place. The mutual trust came from the fact that they already paid me hundreds or ...


7

I'm gonna assume you mean web development and related work. Don't put any work on your client's servers until it's completely paid for. No matter how much they beg, plead, or try to make you feel guilty, don't do it. If it's possible, it's an even better idea if you don't let them access the work except through a remote desktop situation, so nobody can ...


7

I would have to say that this is an opinion based question and there is no right or wrong answer. My answer is based on my desire to do the right thing for my clients. I would say yes, but to a point. Perhaps this is a bug that was in your application? Whether the project was fixed bid or hourly, it is your responsibility to deliver a working application. ...


6

So this is an interesting question and I decided to do a little research. It seems that non-resident employees (those who are residents of one country but work in another) are subject to double taxation (being taxed by both their country of residence and country of work) unless they obtain special dispensation by filing a lot of paperwork. New Zealand UK ...


5

If your only edge vs other freelancers is price, you've already lost this battle. Why not offer some nominal service as a bonus, that won't tax you too heavily and keep the price consistent? Also - promote yourself on what you can accomplish, and not just price. Anybody can promote on being the cheapest, but the cheapest ain't always the best! Real, ...


5

As Scott said, in general you don't change your price or rules a lot. If you can get 5 clients with your rules, don't change them for the 6th client. Now, there are some situations that you WANT to get that job. It's either interesting or you see more work or you don't have much work currently etc. No matter what, if you really want that job, then soften ...


5

To add to codenoire. He talked only about the securing your sources, not about payment. For secure payment you can use several methods: Milestones Weekly or bi-weekly payments by counting work hours spent on specific set of tickets Loading money to some escrow service


4

You say your partnership is protected by a written contract. That's good. Now, you have to answer to this questions: Does the contract specifies ownership transfer of the domain name from just your partner to both of you? Is the contract wrote in such a way that all your responsibilities/rights are listed clear and without any confusion? Does this contract ...


4

In my 10 years freelancing I've found the best ways to avoid this are: be clear on payment arrangement to start, leaving no vague areas. Hourly with timesheets, monthly, project based. be clear on when payment is expected, exactly, before you start. Don't just assume when you finish it you'll be paid, state it clearly in an email with confirmation. Get ...


4

This varies from place to place and sometimes with time, as well as the relationships of the countries involved. In general, it is a reasonably safe bet that some sort of work permit is required to do billable work onsite for a customer in another country. The form of work permit may vary. For example, if you are a professional in IT services with a 4 ...


4

Timesnapper is a commercial windows application that does much of what you are looking for. It includes reporting with breakdown of applications being used and automatically takes screenshots on a time basis. I believe the data is recorded locally, so in some form it is in your control. Whether this is enough for your clients, I don't know.


4

Since tax and trade agreements differ widely between different countries, the only thing we can address directly is your example - USA and India. The United States charges a 30% flat tax rate for all foreign entities receiving income from a US entity. This rate may be lower if the foreign country has a tax treaty with the United States, which India does (10-...


4

Several BIG mistakes: No written contract (biggest mistake) No statement-of-work specifying deliverables (i.e. I don't think you probably agreed, before starting work, to be responsible for builds done by third parties on the customer's behalf, but somehow you are tangled up in try to explain why they're not working) You put ALL the work in one big $6000 ...


4

Premise Any job that can be done remotely is doable by someone with a mental disability, unless that disability is so severe that they cannot function adequately enough for the job*, or where they'd put someone else at risk of harm (that decision is up to their doctor). The Ideal Situation In the UK, it's a requirement of the Equality Act and Disability ...


4

Most software projects don't really need your physical presence if you think about it. For example a web developer just need an FTP access to start working. It wouldn't matter if the person behind the screen is disable or not as long as they can get the job done. And Clients don't necessary need to know that.


4

I do not agree with the comments. I've been working remotely for the past 3 years doing multiple lines of work ranging from full-stack developer to project management to devops. Certifications are often overlooked, same goes for schooling. There is one, and only one thing that will get you anywhere, experience. Experience can be validated in 2 forms, a ...


4

I would argue that there are cases where you can ask your client to pay for education. I'm not sure that something as general as iOS development would qualify however. For example: I was hired a while back to work on a financial application. There was a particular area that required advanced mathematical modelling techniques that I wasn't familiar with (...


4

Needless to say that I was in a similar situation. A company owner created a contract with me and then assigned a lead person to handle all team members. The lead person apparently never liked me, because my knowledge was better that his. As a result, a month or so later, my contract was ended, due to some silly reasons, without their being able to find code ...


4

A retainer is a set monthly fee for you to take charge of a service or for responding to and fixing/repairing/updating/sorting your customers' issues/problems/changes out. An hourly rate is where you add up your time spent per week (say) and invoice them per hour. The benefit for the customer of a retainer is that they know what your role is (as specified ...


3

In regards to your question about including it in your CV: Absolutely! Your commute (or lack thereof) does not take away from the fact that you performed a service for your client. When including it though, it should either fill a time gap, or highlight some special skill or knowledge you posses, and not just be there to 'pad' your CV.


3

Possible? Sure. But it you have to consider the nature of project management to understand how to get work. As the project manager role is so critical to the success of a project, companies seeking this type of person will rely heavily on reputation and familiarity. You may be qualified, but why should a client entrust you with a project if they don't know ...


3

It seems you're assuming their reason for not hiring you is the fact that you're outside US, but there doesn't seem to be any real evidence to think so. I have been freelancing for a few years and have a few friends doing the same, all of us regularly get awarded projects by US clients and have had generally pleasant experiences with them. If there are ...


3

If you're working outside the UK, you do not need a UK work visa. Visas are for those physically entering the UK — should you to travel to the UK you can find a definitive answer on the UK government's website: https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa For example for visits of less than 6 months you may not need one: https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa/y/usa/work/...


3

A company can contract another company to provide services from anywhere in the world so I can't see why you'd need a work permit to perform freelancing services remotely. If you physically travel to the UK to perform your duties then you probably will need a work permit. Official government guidelines here: https://www.gov.uk/visas-immigration (usual ...


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