19

In my experience, when prospective clients specify technologies, they're coming more from a place of having heard of others using them successfully, rather than of having considered the use case and made an educated and informed decision. I talk to them about why they chose the tools they did. If their reasoning is sound, awesome. If not, I remind them that ...


17

Your client is a person, too. They have been late or missed deadlines at some point in their life as well. Unless you have a really aggressive client, they should understand that things happen. And if they are extremely upset about it.. they might not be the type of client you wan to keep around. I take a very relaxed approach to communicating with clients. ...


17

Probably, everyone who's in freelance/outsourcing business have had these problems. I'm not thinking my answer will contain an exhaustive list of your possible mistakes, but here are several ones that caught my eye when reading the question. Prepend each item with "possibly", "IMHO", "YMMV", etc. Too high quality standards. It well may be that you are ...


15

TL;DR: In any case, I would suggest to stay positive. Try to turn the things like you are not raising a conflict of interests by asking something for yourself. Try to convince your client that you have the same goals, to make the job done at minimal cost and maximum quality. Also, resolving an existing problem prior doing anything else seems to be a good ...


12

While not programming or development related, I have subcontracted and been a subcontractor. When hiring, I have found it very necessary to remain in constant contact with the subcontractor. Not incessantly so, but regularly. My favorite phrase is "Okay, I'll check back in X days to see where we're at." And I do that repeatedly regardless of where the ...


12

Absolutely not! If you have agreed on terms, and delivered, then you should expect him to deliver on his part of the arrangement. Having said that... Did you give him status updates with the opportunity for feedback? Did he understand the limitations he put in place for you? Does he seem to want to continue to use you if you keep working for him? These ...


10

As someone who makes a living building teams of contractors to handle projects for my clients, I can say positively that communication, accurate expectations, and finding people who will work well together are crucial elements to a successful project. 10x that if your contractors are remote. You mentioned that at one time you had 20 contractors working for ...


10

In your Scope of Work contract, you should always have a clause about unforeseen circumstances that could introduce delays. I come from the IT Services industry, and that is one thing we always mention: The absolute minimum completion time/date, and the potential end time/date, for anything that may come up. I get to deal with almost a thousand clients ...


10

Well I also did some deductions after I was late in the project. I took down my hourly price 25%. In the end, the client was happy, but I am not sure I did the right way. After this event, I started informing clients as soon as I run across the bottleneck or slow task by explaining them why I estimated atask for X hours and now realize it will take Y hours....


9

I am going to speak as the outsourced freelancer, specifically with IT projects (not necessarily programming). When I am given assignments, we would usually get treated like idiots, meaning that there is documentation up the ying-yang, including pictures and exact keys to press (i.e. Type ipconfig /all and press enter to execute the command). There was a ...


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


8

Irrespective of whether you are following Agile practices, if you do not involve the client from the outset, or someone else who can make decisions about project deliverables on behalf of the client (a Business Stakeholder in Agile parlance), then the odds are stacked very heavily against you actually delivering a product that the client wants and can use. ...


8

You should clearly clarify these points initially : The full description of the work you have to submit, and a complete list of the different elements making it. The number of "versions" you agree to make before charging an option (of a previously agreed cost) and how much maximum time you will work for a version change A list of previously defined ...


8

Bill him for the hours you spend on the phone. Those are consulting hours. No further work will proceed until the account is brought current. All future phone conversations will also be billed. I went from disliking these type of clients to loving them. we could spend 12 hours on the phone for all I care. I have a Bluetooth so I can multitask and they get to ...


7

There are hundreds of pieces of web and desktop software available that could help you. Most of them will offer free trails so I recommend you try a few and see what works best for you. Here are a few I use: Podio.com: this has an iOS app that goes alongside the website, you can have many projects, invite clients to post on message walls, set up projects ...


7

If you make a contract for a fixed price you should also fix the amount of work that will be done. With that, such a significant change would require a contract and price modification.


6

In general prompt communication is a good thing. You should let your client know as soon as possible what the problems are so that if chances need to be made to the work plan/scope of work, they can de done in a way you both can live with. Maybe they will decide it is too much trouble and pay you for work done. Maybe they will decide they want to expand ...


6

I've run into exactly the same problem. I left a web design firm where I was an account exec, went out on my own, built teams and won some large scale contracts, and made great money with some great people. (I took a 3yr hiatus to windsurf - reflected on what I wanted to do, and realized, I love coding - I want to stick with that - so I'm longer trying to ...


6

If, after talking with them at length about their requirements and how well their requirements mesh with my capabilities, they still choose a platform that isn't as well suited to their project as others, I make sure to include assumptions in my proposal that cover problems I anticipate I might have. I'll have made sure to tell them that some requirements, ...


6

As a solo freelancer, in order to take on larger projects, you will need to build a trusted team you can work with. This will take time and effort. One way to begin, is by joining and participating in local user groups, attend the workshops and social evenings. You will get to know other freelancers, what their strengths/weaknesses are. Assume that if ...


6

For the best result, I think it's important to: let the client know as soon as possible that you may not be able to meet the deadline (this gives the client the maximum amount of time to make alternative arrangements if needed) be honest and explain why (it may be something out of your control) find out what the impact to the client will be (it may not be ...


6

Well from what I can see, you are a good photographer and you have more work than you can handle. So this is a good position for expansion. The same happened to me in the programming field. Declining a long-term client is never a good idea. Especially if a client is paying you your price and if he's a good client. So bringing another man to a team is a way ...


5

Two things come to mind. You're not hiring the right people. Or You need to let go a little, which is a vital part of being a good manager. In general I'd say to trust your instincts, but your high turnover leads me to wonder if you don't understand that delegation means letting go to a certain extent. Maybe their work is not what you would do, but it ...


5

To give a brief overview of source control system, there are 2 basic types of source control system - distributed and centralised. The key difference between these is that centralised systems hold the source code in one central place, whereas with distributed systems developers have their own local repository to push changes to before committing them to one (...


5

The single worst mistake I ever made as a contractor was agreeing to provide source code before payment was made. Don't do it. This doesn't pass the "smell test" at all.


4

Does the above seem like an appropriate communication? It's fine. Practices vary, but your decisions and path aren't out of the ordinary, and are quite generous (though your fee per week late is exceptional!). Is anything missing from it? A contract, and written communications. The real problem here is that he doesn't pay attention to email, and ...


4

I have been working in the IT sector since the last few years; actually started a venture back in 2000 and have it going good now. Initially i used to get projects as the third party where someone from the US or some other country got the job from his client and he/she used to outsource the job to us. I felt it many times that my client was not very happy ...


4

Simple down to earth advice: unless you have a contract or document that explicitly includes the requirement to supply the source code before payment, I think you are right not to change the existing arrangement. I would not go behind person B's back though, that might escalate. I'd communicate with person B and explain the situation and the way of working ...


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