22

In my experience, when prospective clients specify technologies, they're coming more from a place of having heard of others using them successfully, rather than of having considered the use case and made an educated and informed decision. I talk to them about why they chose the tools they did. If their reasoning is sound, awesome. If not, I remind them that ...


11

Absolutely not! If you have agreed on terms, and delivered, then you should expect him to deliver on his part of the arrangement. Having said that... Did you give him status updates with the opportunity for feedback? Did he understand the limitations he put in place for you? Does he seem to want to continue to use you if you keep working for him? These ...


10

Well I also did some deductions after I was late in the project. I took down my hourly price 25%. In the end, the client was happy, but I am not sure I did the right way. After this event, I started informing clients as soon as I run across the bottleneck or slow task by explaining them why I estimated atask for X hours and now realize it will take Y hours....


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


9

Bill him for the hours you spend on the phone. Those are consulting hours. No further work will proceed until the account is brought current. All future phone conversations will also be billed. I went from disliking these type of clients to loving them. we could spend 12 hours on the phone for all I care. I have a Bluetooth so I can multitask and they get to ...


7

I've run into exactly the same problem. I left a web design firm where I was an account exec, went out on my own, built teams and won some large scale contracts, and made great money with some great people. (I took a 3yr hiatus to windsurf - reflected on what I wanted to do, and realized, I love coding - I want to stick with that - so I'm longer trying to ...


6

For the best result, I think it's important to: let the client know as soon as possible that you may not be able to meet the deadline (this gives the client the maximum amount of time to make alternative arrangements if needed) be honest and explain why (it may be something out of your control) find out what the impact to the client will be (it may not be ...


6

As a solo freelancer, in order to take on larger projects, you will need to build a trusted team you can work with. This will take time and effort. One way to begin, is by joining and participating in local user groups, attend the workshops and social evenings. You will get to know other freelancers, what their strengths/weaknesses are. Assume that if ...


6

If, after talking with them at length about their requirements and how well their requirements mesh with my capabilities, they still choose a platform that isn't as well suited to their project as others, I make sure to include assumptions in my proposal that cover problems I anticipate I might have. I'll have made sure to tell them that some requirements, ...


5

Does the above seem like an appropriate communication? It's fine. Practices vary, but your decisions and path aren't out of the ordinary, and are quite generous (though your fee per week late is exceptional!). Is anything missing from it? A contract, and written communications. The real problem here is that he doesn't pay attention to email, and ...


5

The single worst mistake I ever made as a contractor was agreeing to provide source code before payment was made. Don't do it. This doesn't pass the "smell test" at all.


5

Well from what I can see, you are a good photographer and you have more work than you can handle. So this is a good position for expansion. The same happened to me in the programming field. Declining a long-term client is never a good idea. Especially if a client is paying you your price and if he's a good client. So bringing another man to a team is a way ...


4

I have been working in the IT sector since the last few years; actually started a venture back in 2000 and have it going good now. Initially i used to get projects as the third party where someone from the US or some other country got the job from his client and he/she used to outsource the job to us. I felt it many times that my client was not very happy ...


4

Simple down to earth advice: unless you have a contract or document that explicitly includes the requirement to supply the source code before payment, I think you are right not to change the existing arrangement. I would not go behind person B's back though, that might escalate. I'd communicate with person B and explain the situation and the way of working ...


4

"Thank you for your work so far. However as I stated multiple times, I need a minimum of 1 article every 2 business days. Since you are unable to deliver this I am cancelling the project effective immediately." See https://www.freelancer.com/support/Project/how-to-cancel-a-project Hire some others to do the work you need. Your reputation is at stake so it'...


4

If it were me, considering everything that you've told us, I would tell the client that I can no longer perform work for him and I would terminate the relationship.


3

Since the door to the full-time gig is closed.. forget that aspect. It's done, no turning back. As for how to relay the additional open hours to the side job... I'd simply let then know my availability has increased and I'd be interested in assisting further if possible. Something along the lines of.... Hi X, I just wanted to drop you a line and ...


3

Unlike Stacey's reply, maybe you are like me and you charge enough, but have periods when you simply cannot sit and do tasks. If this is the case, then the only thing that works in my case is to set some aim, estimate its cost and then do as much as you can to achieve it as soon as possible. For example, your wife wants a new car and if you sell her ...


3

If the money you're making from your current clients will support you financially, and you're confident that they'll continue to consistently provide you with work, then it's reasonable to quit your day job. If your freelance business simply cannot grow because you have absolutely no time left during to day to take on more freelance work, and you're ...


3

1. Decide the quote based on the job, and amount of work-hour it would take. Even-though you are not working per hour basis. Things to remember : - You can start with a lower rates if you expect to get more work from the same client in the future. - Consider market rates,if you are a starter it is better to start at reasonable/cheaper rate. - ...


3

Possible? Sure. But it you have to consider the nature of project management to understand how to get work. As the project manager role is so critical to the success of a project, companies seeking this type of person will rely heavily on reputation and familiarity. You may be qualified, but why should a client entrust you with a project if they don't know ...


3

This is a great problem to have! While many freelancers struggle to keep there pipelines full, you've got your hands full, so firstly congratulate yourself on being so reliable and great at your job that you're literally overflowing with work. Now onto your question, finding a way to successfully outsource your work all while making sure that: it is both up ...


3

I guess she is wrong. Unless there is some provision about premature interruption in the contract, they did order the works and have to pay their duty, in the terms agreed upon. In case they do not want the milestone to be performed at all, you are in a position to claim damages. I assume that if you can prove that you performed all the work (and couldn't ...


3

No, that's total B.S.! This sounds like a case of buyer's remorse. You contracted to get paid if you completed the work -- it's that simple. She is in breach of contract. As a matter of fact, it's a "constructive" breach because she's already told you that she's not going to hold up her end of the agreement. Technically, that's enough to get a civil ...


3

Wow, I cannot say NO enough to some of the answers here! You need a password manager for your passwords! KeePass is a good free one, as is LastPass. Check out their websites for a comparison between them. Do NOT store customer passwords in plain text, as it opens you up to a liability claim if the client discovers it! DO NOT USE PLAIN TEXT!!! Additional ...


3

How do I go about getting a group of members together for no pay, but a share of the profit if we receive any. Realistically, you either bring along a bunch of close friends who are experts in the field and passionate enough about the idea to take a huge financial risk on it, "hire" some naïve and incompetent college students and string them along ...


3

I'm not familiar with Australia's laws, nor am I a lawyer. But here's what I'd do. Stick to your guns - do not send source code! First, take into account any payment terms that apply to the invoice. What are your payment terms? (I hope you have SOMETHING established, in writing!!!) If you don't have specific payment terms, then you can probably ...


3

I would simply write an email to Person B explaining how you and Person A did business before, detail how the work flow process worked before and how it can be beneficial now. Ask the right questions, it could be the way his previous employment had him do things and he may not know any better. i.e " I have never shared my source code prior to payment for ...


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