16

In my experience, a website will - in itself - give you nothing. Clients are only found by actively seeking them. When you have lots of face time with a potential client, a website should make no difference. However, a website could be helpful as a supplement, as it allows a short chance encounter in which contact details were exchanged, to perhaps become ...


15

Okay, after reading all the answers and comments here, I would like to add a few additional points to my answer. First off, as freelancers we normally trade our time for money. So it seems natural to base the price of a monthly service off of how much time it takes us to do it. And that might be fine if you're just getting started, but like Joe (OP) said, ...


13

If you aren't already charging market value it's highly unlikely you'll retain any existing customers once you do start charging market value. Chances are, clients you currently have are clients because you aren't charging them what anyone else would charge. If you raise your pricing to more standard rates, these clients will most often just go find someone ...


10

When someone needs a website, in most of the cases, they have no idea that there is a designer and a developer, or someone who can do both things, they just look for "someone who builds my good looking and functional website", without making much difference between web design or web development. They are completely unaware of your skills, they don't even ...


9

The challenge that you're going to run into with Freelance web development is that, in my experience, many Web developers have pretty broad understanding of the entire development stack from databases to server-side coding to front-end HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Thus, if you're just starting out and wish to avoid learning other parts of the stack, you may ...


7

If you're doing front end development, you will need a portfolio before you get any big jobs, end of story. So how do you get a portfolio without the jobs? What I did before was make sample pages for friends of the family, and a couple volunteer organisations I belonged to. It was all under the impression that they only paid if they used my designs, but ...


6

That's completely up to you, and what risks you're willing to take. I'm a huge advocate for hourly billing and that (along with a few other key concepts) defines more than just what I charge for. Because my freelancing philosophy is that I consider myself the product I have no reason to sell anything else (hosting, domains, other freelancers' time). ...


6

Since now I was very rarely contacted by clients that found me from my website, and consider that I am online with my website since 1996, each 1-2 years I renewed it making it tecnically and graphically up to date (being a web developer and designer, it should be an example of good design and efficiency), it responds well to keywords and have a good number ...


5

Depending upon the nature of your freelancing, your targeted financial goals, and your client base -- the proper thing to do would be to hire someone that can create what you need if you have no experience with it. That being posted you can do it yourself, by all means. My point is, if freelancing in whatever field is your business... treat it like a ...


5

The most experienced web developers will sell you a fixed-price package where they will list what you get for a certain value. They have a lot of experience and they can go with a fixed price without being risk of loss. But even then, that calculated price is usually based on estimated work hours spent on the tasks listed in the offer. So hourly price is ...


5

Unless your client is high-profile and huge, or the software is mission-critical, you're going to have a hard time justifying the extra time taken for tests to clients. Most clients tend to think that writing tests just takes longer (your average time taken to do something is at least 50% more), and clients don't value the return on investment given by unit/...


5

As a freelancer you must negotiate your own pay. This will depend on your skill level, customer needs and financial constraints in the market you are targeting.


5

This really tells us nothing about what the application will actually do or its complexity. AND we're not here to do that for you anyway. You can go about this two ways: 1) Pick an hourly rate that you're comfortable with, and charge that. The client has the flexibility to tailor the requirements in whatever fashion, and you don't worry about that piece ...


5

Pricing is notoriously difficult as it depends on several factors: Your own desired hourly rate What the client typically pays The perceived value to the client Whether the project is similar to anything you have undertaken before Whether the client has clear requirements or not Whether giving a discount most probably will lead to more work While you ...


4

A reasonable course of action would be to quote the estimated number of hours required to complete the task, your hourly rate and your availability. Consider quoting a premium rate for work outside of your normal working hours and you will soon find out how much of an emergency this is for your client. The client may accept or decline your proposal or come ...


4

I do not agree with the comments. I've been working remotely for the past 3 years doing multiple lines of work ranging from full-stack developer to project management to devops. Certifications are often overlooked, same goes for schooling. There is one, and only one thing that will get you anywhere, experience. Experience can be validated in 2 forms, a ...


4

I have also been in the same situation as yourself when I started to learn web development. It seems that what your customers are wanting is a simple information website. In this case, the best case scenario would be to do your research into what freelancers normally charge. You can visit http://upwork.com or https://www.freelancer.co.uk to get a rough idea. ...


4

Ask the client what they mean - and get concrete answers. If the website includes some sort of content management system, the client probably wants a document including screen dumps describing how to perform typical tasks. Many clients will not be using the functionality on a daily basis and therefore need instructions; these must be provided by you - ...


4

Obviously, the following is not legal advise, but just some general advise from a seasoned freelancer / consultant: It looks like your client is right in demanding a partial refund, given that you promised to deliver in accordance with the specifications. If you don't give them a refund, they can send you an arbitration demand and they'll basically sue you, ...


3

Your question and the explanation ask two different questions that have two different answers. Your question asks if it's ethical/acceptable to USE templates for clients. The answer is yes. Most developers without design experience do exactly that. As long as you're offering some transparency about it to your clients, this should not be an issue. However, ...


3

I'm a strong proponent of hourly billing, as that's what I'm selling (my time). In your case, adding a retainer may be a good way to keep your clients comfortable with the arrangement (getting generally the same bill each month), while protecting against a major time loss for you. Take what you think you'll spend (or have found already that you spend) per ...


3

Sending them unsolicited work is not only going to irritate your desired client, but could have legal implications. Honestly it sounds like a very aggressive, bullying kind of tactic, and what if they take your rebuilt site and rip it off or publish it without paying you because you used their name/logo/information/etc without their permission? If you are ...


3

I agree with @SOIA (conditions should be per contract, verbal agreements are difficult and expensive to enforce so they are not likely to chase). I have been freelancing since 1994 and only once did I turn up on site without a contract. I got paid, but I learned an important lesson never to do something like that again. Never start a contract without ...


3

You can surely freelance using those skills. But, given the condition,I cannot foresee a clientbase with pretty nice cash inflow towards your side. Generally, with these skills, you will be getting clients who need portfolio/static websites. That too, depends on how you bag these clients. Getting more knowledge on Wordpress and other CMSes will help you to ...


3

Actually, contracts most often work the other way around: The client insisting that you ensure the code is legal and lives up to standard industry practices. As a freelancer, you often deal with clients with very little knowledge or interest in IT. Contractually, you could have them assume the legal risks. Personally, I always view myself as the client's ...


3

Quick question for you, does the client care how it's done, or that it gets done? Clients typically hire you for your skill, and for results, without caring how you do it. I have brought in sub-contractors for jobs, and still just changed my regular rate. My rate will cover a contractor or two, if I need some things done that I either don't have time for, ...


3

Agree with the answer stating that you will not be able to retain current clients. Once you've 'anchored' your price level, it turns out to be virtually impossible to change it. In addition, new freelancers tend to undervalue their own services, because they find the work relatively straight-forward and therefore don't charge by the value it gives the ...


3

In many cases, no. But it all depends upon your contract with the agent/headhunter. Unless your agreement with the headhunter specifically states they must disclose your company to all the clients you complete work for, they are perfectly fine keeping you an "invisible" entity. In fact, this is often the backbone of some firms... they collect a stable of ...


3

Just my experience, but here's what a web site actually does for you in most instances: It will lend credibility to you (or your company) if it is not too generic. If the site looks like a template or just some random stock photo infused script, it won't help as much as it will hurt. It needs to be personable and unique. It may provide uncertain clients a ...


3

Your website is only crucial, but a single component of your clients' the overall buying journey. Here's what your client's journey should look like: They hear about you from a previous client of yours and want a website too. They look you up and look at your work, read your blog articles, etc. Everything on your site, social media profiles, Dribbble page, ...


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