10

You should never neglect your health. You should sleep for about 6-8 hours a day to be healthy. You can end up in trouble at a later age. Plan out in such a way that you don't overwork and you need to skip your sleep. You can work for 8 - 10 hours a day and still end up finishing the project. If you end up with minor bugs you can speak to the client and ask ...


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


8

So much to address here... First off, NO. You don't need a PR person on full-time to help you. You need to deal with your own situation before you bring more people in. Freelancing should make you more money than being a regular full-time employee, punching in and out everyday. What are your rates at? Obviously, too low. Read the other questions on here ...


7

First off, remember that Linux is marketed as very robust, open source, and free (with a few exceptions). Can you keep that philosophy? The reason distributions become popular are for different reasons. Ubuntu became popular because someone was able to make all the decisions, and choose where development happened. Debian is build to be rock solid, but doesn'...


6

Unless the client made assurances to be immediately contactable during this period, they have no urgent need to respond. There are anumber of things that might be diverting their attention. I would suggest allowing at least 72 hours before following up.


5

If it were me, I'd ignore the outside contractor entirely unless specifically asked. I would not intentionally note anything the outside contractor is suggesting and I wouldn't "build in" counter arguments to my bid. I would detail what I feel is the proper way to proceed and why. Giving a solid argument on your own merits rather than bouncing them off of ...


5

In the past I myself did the same. And with time I became concerned by the rightness of this (what I now call) bat habit of mine. Unfortunately, I still do it. Not as intense as in the past but sometimes, without intent I wake-up at four in the morning still coding. Maybe a new feature (which I start at midnight after I end a project for some client) or ...


5

I understand where you're coming from: you aren't doing as much work in your opinion, so you don't want to charge your full rate. I'm going to tell you though... CHARGE YOUR FULL RATE Why? Because, as a Freelancer, you are the professional, and companies need to realize that. As I state in other answers, you are being hired for your expertise, not your ...


5

Figure your hourly rate if you don't already know it. Calculate how much time each feature will take you to build. Time to build feature multiplied by your hourly rate provides the Feature Cost. Add up all the feature cost values to get total project cost. Add up all the feature build time values to get total project time. Explain dependencies in your ...


5

Ever heard of Rovio Entertainment? Well, most people hadn't until the company released their 52nd game. The first 51 weren't really all that great, but number 52, Angry Birds, put them on the map and netted them 200 million dollars in 2012. The point is that not every project you do will be a success, and that's okay because finding a winning idea takes ...


5

The single worst mistake I ever made as a contractor was agreeing to provide source code before payment was made. Don't do it. This doesn't pass the "smell test" at all.


5

Ah, the good old fashioned "stuff works and never breaks" assumption from a non-it manager. First up, DBA requirements. Advise them that if they do not wish to procure DBA support from you, they will need to provide their own DBA. Ensure that your terms of service/sla/etc do not include DBA support as part of the package. Next, general support ...


4

I don't think there is a single right answer here, so I am going to focus on how to make the decision. Keep in mind that open source development is a potentially very visible thing, so the more you do, the greater presence you have. I try to allocate a bare minimum of 4 hours a week of purely community projects. Keep in mind I have paid the bills for the ...


4

You should try to find someone with a lot of experience on LinkedIn. People who use freelance websites are usually not looking for a business commitment. That being said it does not mean you cannot find someone on a freelance website. What I would do (I don't know if it's your case) is find someone with a recommendation from someone like an ex coworker, ...


4

Firstly, go thru a good book on ASP.NET and pass it along with all tests in it. Then either: Think of your own ASP.NET project and make it Look at the sites like odesk.com for projects that client's request and make such project for yourself. If you change data, you can even put it inside the portfolio. Try to have a few projects in portfolio (when I ...


4

The application and source code is yours (assuming you wrote it) unless your contract specifically states this is "a work for hire". If you have no contract, the application and source code is yours. The U.S. copyright law has been this way since 1978, further clarified in early 1980s. Prior to 1978, the US copyright law was as described in answers posted ...


4

Why don't you simply go from math to coding or engineering/robotic in school? Frankly, these domains are very related. You learn very important things in school that you won't learn on your own: the most important one is methodology. There's a huge difference between the "self-made" freelancers and the ones who got some training. You may be a quick learner ...


4

Simple down to earth advice: unless you have a contract or document that explicitly includes the requirement to supply the source code before payment, I think you are right not to change the existing arrangement. I would not go behind person B's back though, that might escalate. I'd communicate with person B and explain the situation and the way of working ...


3

Whilst impossible to state that 'no that site does not exist', I can say that no such site exists that has significant market share and thus would not suffer from the same problem as the PeoplePerHour UK site. Essentially your question is centred around two issues; needing higher quality (ideally UK) clients, and differentiating yourself from $5 per hour ...


3

If you insist on sprinting to complete the project at the beginning, I would suggest looking into polyphasic sleep as a possibly healthier alternative. Basically, instead of sleeping once per day for 6 to 8 hours straight, you spread your sleep time across each 24-hour period and require less total sleep-time in the process. It might give you a head start on ...


3

Front end development, and web development, is a very general thing. Ideally you will find the part you like most and you rock most. We cannot tell you where you are best at, that is what you have to figure out by working on web projects. At the beginning, as more things you can do, the more work you will get. I would go for hot things such as adaptive ...


3

Honestly you are selling yourself, and your ability to create something, your clients likely will not care what technologies you use in the process. Therefore I would say being competent with at least one set of full stack technologies. As others have mentioned this almost certainly means having a solid grounding in HTML, CSS and Javascript (arguably you can ...


3

If you are going to be a successful freelance developer, then you need to be very competent across the entire web stack, from manipulation of data right through to presentation in the browser. You can't simply be a specialist in either front or back end development and rely on another team member to provide specialism in the other discipline, unless you ...


3

First of all, search for some internship to a company (a place where you give your time in exchange for the opportunity to gain knowledge and real life experience). Why do this? It will open many doors. You will meet people, you will have what to write in your CV and what to show when some one ask's for your portfolio. In meanwhile, hustle; search for ...


3

I'm a Software Engineering student, and first thing you do, make yourself an online portfolio. Showcase your skills. As a student you will have a lot of projects, add them on as you progress in your course. If your skills are good, hardly you'll have any project that wouldn't be worth showing. In regards to how to get projects. It depends on what area of IT ...


3

Are you living in a country with good legal protection of the worker? If yes, then I strongly say DO disclose. I am worried that if I disclose this to my employer, they will think I'm going to leave one day. This is good! He should know that his employee is so good that other clients pays him for his skills. He will respect you more. Why would your ...


3

If the rules are that you disclose, then I think you should. It sounds like you value your job and don't want to lose it over freelancing. However, I would give as few details as they will accept. There may be positives from telling them but I'm not quite as optimistic as the others who answered. I have a freelancer who works for me and his company knew ...


3

How do I go about getting a group of members together for no pay, but a share of the profit if we receive any. Realistically, you either bring along a bunch of close friends who are experts in the field and passionate enough about the idea to take a huge financial risk on it, "hire" some naïve and incompetent college students and string them along ...


3

I'd suggest looking for other potential leads for work. Two of which have worked very well for me in the past. 1/ Networking events. Get yourself on meetup.com or similar and join local entrepreneurs/business start ups groups. You may find people starting or running small businesses who need design work doing. 2/ Facebook Seriously. I don't just mean ...


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