31

Is it unprofessional - Yes. Should you skip a lucrative opportunity - probably not. Now, these two things are in collision, as they always are. The only thing you can do here is work the lucrative job in regular work hours, and do the bargain job after that (probably late afternoon and night). So paid jobs are done in the prime time, and low-paid jobs after....


11

I have terminated a few contracts and I have always agonized about it. However, termination goes smoothly because the client usually hasn't gone through the mental anguish over the project that I have. They usually are pretty calm and professional about it, despite whatever shenanigans happened during the project. I always use the timeline as a reason for ...


10

I think it would be reasonable, since you're only on a three month contract with no specified goals besides "do some work" (my favorite kind of contractual agreement btw), to give them a heads up that you're going to be decreasing your involvement. Here's where you could offer some creative solutions. Since the hours that you spend on things is not ...


10

If you need to cut them as a client, you need to do it sooner rather then later. Doing it later lets the problem build and build, and you carry more emotional weight when you finally do it. If it was a small problem brewing from a while ago, I'd talk to them about it, and possibly try to salvage the relationship. It sounds like you tried (showing proof, ...


9

You should really decide this explicitly in your contract, and have a cancellation clause. If you are offering an hourly rate for your work (rather than a fixed amount), you should ideally make this cancellation fee a large percentage of this hourly rate (if not 100%, though you could probably negotiate, or even get more, depending on how willing your ...


7

If you two have no contract, then what is he breaching? on the other hand, the mutual understanding is valid in front of the law. I'd say that he was not acting correctly, from what you wrote. He should have given you more tasks. And if not being satisfied, he should have told you that. So if this comes to the arbitration, I'd say that email are enough of ...


7

In Upwork, I think there should be a valid contract between client and freelancer, the client should have made a deposit for the job, so you can: finish the work and pretend the payment, ignoring what he says ask maybe a 50%-75% of the final cost as indemnification for the work you did already In case 1, I think you can contact Upwork support because the ...


6

No, don't ditch him yet, he does not cost you anything. He may actually have some other plans, but it does not look too bad. Unless (!) he owes you money. Does he? Since you said that his account was locked and he was too lazy to open it. If he owes you money, then of course, you will stick to him. If he does not, I would stick to him. Do your other work ...


6

Since you're asking the question, I think the answer in your case is fairly obvious. If they had not already crossed the line, you would not be asking this question. They have breached your contract and broken your trust to a point that you doubt the future of your relationship with them. That doubt and uncertainty can not be repaired except by them and you ...


6

I concur with @Hiroto's answer, but would also add that you should consider working like a lawyer does: with a retainer. That is, your contract should reflect full payment (and if the amount is at all uncertain, then err on the higher side to protect yourself) for the project in advance, before you even begin to work on the project. Then if you finish under ...


5

When going 50/50, it's very hard to be covered as you would. So maybe 50/50 is not a good plan for larger projects. It's better for a smaller tasks which you can finish in 1 week or so. I would rather go with a milestone plan. It's still a fixed-price project, but you are paid after each milestone. This is the flow: Milestone 1 finished -> Client test ...


5

Conor, Looks as if you've kind of blew it on this one. When a client reserves the right to make changes to requirements, then you CAN'T do fixed price and expect to make a profit. Your only saving grace might be that you've set milestones, thereby making portions of the project severable. If I were you, I'd turn over the work for the first milestone, if ...


5

You have a tough decision to take here. The good thing about freelancing is that you are more or less able to bail on projects if you 'change your mind', but it can be dangerous for your career. A few factors to take into account : - How much can your reputation be hurt? If you've been hired through one of the main websites, canceling the project is ...


5

No one mentioned that blackmailing freelancers for extra work out of scope is explicitly forbidden in the terms of service for most of these sites. Read the terms of service. Elance, for example, says clients may not threaten a bad review to extort free work from the freelancer. If you contact support with proof, the client is busted, they will get in big ...


5

The doctor can't unilaterally modify the terms of your original agreement. Your agreement gives you both the option of using one anothers' services, with no specific mention of cash compensation. You've exercised your option, but the doctor has not. It's that simple. There's no breach but there is a little funny-business going on here. The doctor can ...


4

In my province, we have lots of mines and mills, and many of these sites generate tens of thousands of dollar per hour. The customers do not want any downtime whatsoever, but rarely want to pay for it. This leads to the hammar story. Someone was called out to a mine to fix a critical machine. The entire time it was down, the mine was losing over $50,000....


4

If you know for a fact that, in the long run, choosing the new client will compensate for dropping your to-date employer (client), then choose the arising opportunity. We need to remember that the most important thing is your well-being (it is in your duty to defend your best interests). Maybe, the most important aspect is to measure, how much good the new ...


4

This should be part of your initial contract, an exit clause. What happens if you get hit by a bus? The client would not have access to transfer the site to their own systems or host, right? Any purchases for physical assets (i.e. hardware, peripherals, physical media) can be purchased by you or the client, and given upon payment. Any online license ...


3

Although it may not be nice, you can always mention "your future projects which cannot start because of this one". You also mention how "you promised other clients that you will do their projects and you managed to prolong them for X days, but not anymore". You can also suggest another person to continue the project or a website where the client can find ...


3

When there are breaches of contract, especially to the scope of work or payments, it's going to usually depend on the situation. For a late payment, I would give them a little extra time the first time it's missed, and gently remind them with a quick phone call. If they say the cheque is in the mail, I'll take their word for it, and try for another week. If ...


3

If I break the contract, I may have to return all monies earned during the training period, and I will have to pay $1000 for each month left on the contract. I have seen this in other contracts. They want back the money they invested in you. Since I am not a lawyer, I am not sure if this is legal. But I have seen this in many, many contracts. Especially in ...


3

In the US he would essentially be in breach of contract, but you still used his services. A judge would probably rule for you to do something like pay for the 4 hours at a cost equivalent to your no profit rate, in other words what the traded hours are worth to you (likely discounted off of the doctor's asking rate). US law typically attempts to resolve ...


3

Since you've had the client for a year, the way you interact is unlikely to change. Especially when you directly enable it by accepting to do free work. You need to decide whether working for this client in the manner you describe would be OK if you were paid for 100% of your time. I'm assuming it would be. It seems you are working on a never-ending ...


3

Have you contacted the site's support about this? I would start there. I think they have ways of dealing with these types of situations and can probably remove any negative reviews. Also, If it's Elance, unless the job is marked complete (by both of you, I think) they cannot leave feedback. I don't know how other sites operate but they may be the same. ...


3

Ignoring the non-existent expiry date, it seems they have no obligations after February 2016. The renewal was anticipated but not guaranteed - and since there apparently have been no talks regarding extension, the contract simply expires. I would expect the 90 day period is for premature termination of the contract. In addition, I would expect the contract ...


3

Your question is quite layered so lets take it apart a bit. You have a few different kinds of old clients only some of which I would really call "bad". Friends and Family Those are hard to negotiate with but not bad as such (or so I hope). Once you start to work for friends for free they expect that it will always be the case. In turn I personally find it ...


2

Wrong approach! The fixed-price contract was signed. You started work, in reliance. Maybe they don't need your work any more, or had buyer's remorse -- but you are owed the FULL price. Don't accept anything less. If you were hourly, then it would make sense to break it down into hours (units) of work. Your customer is trying to get over on you. Unless ...


2

From my experience freelancing, it sounds like a typical case of both you and the client lacking a full and transparent understanding of the scope of the project. Because if this, you’re probably going to find yourself doing a ton of extra work for no extra pay. In order to resolve this current issue, I’d recommend speaking to them on the phone and ...


2

It was not you who failed to deliver, it was not you who insisted not to deliver, and you have a contract. You should be invoicing 100% of the amount.


2

This is where networking with other professionals would help. I've "exited" a few clients by recommending them to some other colleagues I've worked with in the past. It has been a reciprocal agreement, and we essentially "trade" clients. I don't mind talking to other people in my field, so I can still help them out if needed. As for the reason? You can use ...


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