42

This is one of the most prominent red flags which indicates a bad client, in my opinion. It's really not that complicated. Sorry, I do not work pro bono or without payment on request. There's no need to explain any further. If they are persistent.... Unfortunately I do not work for free. Like anyone with a mortgage/rent and the desire to eat regularly.......


40

Don't do it. If there were actually a prospect of the site making any real money (thus commissions being worthwhile) the guy wouldn't be offering to pay you in commissions. He's offering this payment structure because he knows the return on commissions will be far less than any standard fees you may want. In general, those offering this type of structure ...


27

I simply state, "Sorry. Pricing is set and rates are non-negotiable." I haven't run into an instance where that offended anyone. I may not get the work but, if they won't pay my rates, I don't see that as a problem. You aren't required to explain anything to clients in terms of your business structure or calculations. Actually going into too much detail is ...


19

May I guess. He approached to you saying if you do this for bargain, you will get more work? Yes you will get more work, 5 times more complex for 50% more money - $150 in your case. Any serious client will let you first do 1 project, and only then he will talk about more work. Because if they immediately say that they have more work, even a bad contractor ...


18

If you do not know how to build an iOS app... How in the world do you know how long it will take you to learn how build one? How would you know how long actually building the app would take? How would you know how long it will take to become familiar and comfortable with security issues? How long to construct and implement Updates? How would you know ...


16

I'll keep my answer simple. If a client is asking for a custom full-fledged CMS/e-commerce site for a $100, as a freelancer, you should read that as "this person is a complete waste of my time," and move on. Of course, don't say that to the client. To the client, be very professional and polite. Thank them for considering you, apologize for not being ...


16

The easiest thing is to shut down all, but what if the client is sick or something. Chances are 90% that they don't want to pay you, but there are still 10% which you need to consider. This is all true if you expect more work from them and if you really like the project. Do you have a direct contact with the client? Do Skype call to his mobile and see what ...


15

You need to shut it down ASAP. Chances are that by now, your "client" has cloned all of your work, which is not hard to do at all, and put it up on a different domain. I put the word client in quotes because, without a written contract, you really don't have anything that would prove how the other party is a "client". You may never see a cent from this ...


15

Yes, it is definitely unethical. You do have other options. You could: Do nothing. Just take the loss and treat it as a learning experience. Next time you will know to never give the client the finished website until they have paid in full. Always host the site on your own servers during development and only transfer the site to the client's servers ...


15

To address your direct question, no, it's not a great practice. To think of it in terms of risks, I would not want to risk my clients' credit card information being stolen (because I would likely be liable for that!) A more common practice is to require a deposit, or a percentage of the total fee due upfront before any work is to be completed. This ensures ...


14

Always after. You've got to protect yourself. The way I'd recommend structuring a project - and make sure you explain this beforehand - is to request a 50% upfront deposit (or whatever amount suits your project). You can say that you need the deposit to secure the project in your timetable which is a great way to get people to pay quickly. Then you make ...


14

If you are performing the work and they are hiring you, there's no reason on Earth you should be paying them anything for any reason.


13

There are obvious benefits to the freelancer if payment is made up front: No chasing the money at the end Harder for a client to cancel the project if they've already paid There is also a big risk to the client: What happens if the freelancer dies or disappears before the end of the project? I have seen 2 reasons why clients are willing to take that risk:...


12

I'm sorry to say, but you can't. And I'm sorry again to say, but the people on Elance are right. They always state clearly when getting a new job to not work until the escrow account is funded. They even send emails reminding to not work until the account is funded. I once did something like this. I started working and finished before realizing the account ...


12

With new clients that approach me, I ask for a non-refundable deposit up front. Usually it ranges from 30% to 50% depending on the overall project cost. I tend to waive the deposit for any client I've previously worked for and not experienced payment issues with. When asked, or if the client balks at this, I explain that the deposit is to cover the work ...


11

This client may have never intended for you to do the work shown in the initial links sent. Perhaps the client is hoping that you will take the bait and actually commit to doing much harder work without changing your price. I'd inform the client that because of a change in scope, you have to change your price. Don't worry about what happens in the future, ...


11

Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) do not state anything about the actual project or compensation. They are an agreement of secrecy separate from any financial arraignment. Because you are being asked to legally promise you will keep the product secret, they will not disclose what the project entails until after you've agreed you will not share those details. ...


11

There are some contest sites that operate under similar terms -- everyone sees the design description/brief, everyone works and submits designs, only the chosen design (winner) gets paid. So yes, in some cases things operate how you've described. These sites are customarily (but not exclusively) populated by hobbyists or non-freelance workers. In terms of a ...


11

You may feel rude but at the end of the day it's your business. If they come back the second time you should give less information than you provided on their first visit, but tell them you can give them a more thorough explanation if they booked an appointment. Alternatively stop giving away free information. When someone calls/comes to see you with their ...


10

The contractor is absolutely right. Why? Putting the website on your server, he's giving you a code or moving the code to your server. And the code is delivered in the end, unless you're paying your contractor hourly. Since we work remotely, we cannot give the code to the client, before we are fully paid for the work (again unless we're paid hourly in which ...


10

Wait, if I understood: you were hired to make a website you did it and the client did not pay it you have access to admin service hosting the website If I understood it properly, than the content on his website is still your. Transfer of intellectual rights happens when one side is paid. So IMHO you should definitely take back your property (source codes)...


10

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


9

You need to decide how complicated the site is going to be and how long it will take for you to get it up and running. Also, will there be any hosting/bandwidth costs, maintenance, etc.? If it's nothing complicated and you can live without the money then by all means go for it, but it's a risky way to earn a living. Get him to show you his trading volumes ...


9

Estimating and consulting are absolutely billable. If you're making an estimation and they're holding the other freelancer to that estimate then you've already provided them with tangible value. Before you continue meeting or talking further about the project you should schedule a meeting or at least send an email stating that the rate and the terms need to ...


9

Always discuss payment before work begins. ALWAYS. (You should have a contract detailing scope and payment) If you fail to do this it is inevitable that you will end up doing work the client doesn't want to pay for.. thus wasting your time and ultimate resulting in conflict and losing the client in most cases.


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


9

It is really little that can be added to excellent @Scott's answer. I just wanted to add a simple tactic that helped me several times. Due warning: I'm not aware about any academic research on this matter. My answer is just from personal experience. […] as in "people will see your art and learn who you are, and maybe THEY will contact you and MAYBE ...


8

If I received the same call and the client started barking requests at me before I could even figure out to whom I was speaking, I think I'd become a bit defensive. I think it's always important, as a creative professional, that you're able to engage with the client at a certain pace. My "pace" includes: Who are you? What line of business are you in? What ...


8

Any combination of: A) We can certainly set this up as a [fixed bid/hourly contract] instead if that makes it easier for you. B) Projects with unique requirements will, of course, entail negotiation. For the scope we've discussed [our standard price applies/I've already applied the appropriate discount of X from our base price]. C) No. D) If there's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible