40

Don't do it. If there were actually a prospect of the site making any real money (thus commissions being worthwhile) the guy wouldn't be offering to pay you in commissions. He's offering this payment structure because he knows the return on commissions will be far less than any standard fees you may want. In general, those offering this type of structure ...


26

I simply state, "Sorry. Pricing is set and rates are non-negotiable." I haven't run into an instance where that offended anyone. I may not get the work but, if they won't pay my rates, I don't see that as a problem. You aren't required to explain anything to clients in terms of your business structure or calculations. Actually going into too much detail is ...


21

It depends on the job - over what period and how much it pays. If this is a short term job with a single deliverable, 50% up front with the remaining payable on delivery is common. But consider something longer term - months to years in the making. 50% may be too much for a client to pay up-front (for something that hasn't been started yet, or simply, too ...


19

There are a bunch of ways people do this. One way I have seen is for clients pay a retainer and then be billed out of that (of the balance goes to 0, the project stalls until the retainer is refilled). In general larger consulting businesses can more easily do this than freelancers but once you have a name for yourself, this may be an option. Others range ...


18

May I guess. He approached to you saying if you do this for bargain, you will get more work? Yes you will get more work, 5 times more complex for 50% more money - $150 in your case. Any serious client will let you first do 1 project, and only then he will talk about more work. Because if they immediately say that they have more work, even a bad contractor ...


18

If you do not know how to build an iOS app... How in the world do you know how long it will take you to learn how build one? How would you know how long actually building the app would take? How would you know how long it will take to become familiar and comfortable with security issues? How long to construct and implement Updates? How would you know ...


16

The easiest thing is to shut down all, but what if the client is sick or something. Chances are 90% that they don't want to pay you, but there are still 10% which you need to consider. This is all true if you expect more work from them and if you really like the project. Do you have a direct contact with the client? Do Skype call to his mobile and see what ...


15

I use this as a rule of thumb, based on the total project time: < 1 week 50% upfront, 50% after delivery < 1 month 25% upfront, 25% in the middle, 50% after delivery > 1 month 25% upfront, 25% after delivery and the remaining 50% is split into milestones


15

TL;DR: In any case, I would suggest to stay positive. Try to turn the things like you are not raising a conflict of interests by asking something for yourself. Try to convince your client that you have the same goals, to make the job done at minimal cost and maximum quality. Also, resolving an existing problem prior doing anything else seems to be a good ...


15

I'll keep my answer simple. If a client is asking for a custom full-fledged CMS/e-commerce site for a $100, as a freelancer, you should read that as "this person is a complete waste of my time," and move on. Of course, don't say that to the client. To the client, be very professional and polite. Thank them for considering you, apologize for not being ...


15

To address your direct question, no, it's not a great practice. To think of it in terms of risks, I would not want to risk my clients' credit card information being stolen (because I would likely be liable for that!) A more common practice is to require a deposit, or a percentage of the total fee due upfront before any work is to be completed. This ensures ...


14

Yes, it is definitely unethical. You do have other options. You could: Do nothing. Just take the loss and treat it as a learning experience. Next time you will know to never give the client the finished website until they have paid in full. Always host the site on your own servers during development and only transfer the site to the client's servers ...


14

If you are performing the work and they are hiring you, there's no reason on Earth you should be paying them anything for any reason.


13

Be careful with this. If you intentionally implement a back door in a work product you're developing for a client, and the client finds out about it, you may find that the trust between you and your client will be destroyed. Also, there may be legal repercussions if disabling the product or application has a negative impact on the client's business. Also, ...


13

I'm sorry to say but you can't. And I'm sorry again to say but the people on elance are right. They always state clearly when getting a new job to NOT WORK until the escrow account is funded. They even send emails reminding to not work until the account is funded. I once did something like this, I started working and finished before realizing the account ...


13

Always after. You've got to protect yourself. The way I'd recommend structuring a project - and make sure you explain this beforehand - is to request a 50% upfront deposit (or whatever amount suits your project). You can say that you need the deposit to secure the project in your timetable which is a great way to get people to pay quickly. Then you make ...


12

Payment options are really less about the freelancer's professional, and more about the kind of customers the freelancer works with and what they are comfortable with. For the customers that I work with (small, local businesses), I am paid via business check. I'd prefer to use an electronic payment, but my customers are comfortable with the current approach ...


12

You need to shut it down ASAP. Chances are that by now, your "client" has cloned all of your work, which is not hard to do at all, and put it up on a different domain. I put the word client in quotes because, without a written contract, you really don't have anything that would prove how the other party is a "client". You may never see a cent from this ...


12

With new clients that approach me, I ask for a non-refundable deposit up front. Usually it ranges from 30% to 50% depending on the overall project cost. I tend to waive the deposit for any client I've previously worked for and not experienced payment issues with. When asked, or if the client balks at this, I explain that the deposit is to cover the work ...


11

There are obvious benefits to the freelancer if payment is made up front: No chasing the money at the end Harder for a client to cancel the project if they've already paid There is also a big risk to the client: What happens if the freelancer dies or disappears before the end of the project? I have seen 2 reasons why clients are willing to take that risk:...


11

Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) do not state anything about the actual project or compensation. They are an agreement of secrecy separate from any financial arraignment. Because you are being asked to legally promise you will keep the product secret, they will not disclose what the project entails until after you've agreed you will not share those details. ...


11

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


11

There are some contest sites that operate under similar terms -- everyone sees the design description/brief, everyone works and submits designs, only the chosen design (winner) gets paid. So yes, in some cases things operate how you've described. These sites are customarily (but not exclusively) populated by hobbyists or non-freelance workers. In terms of a ...


11

You may feel rude but at the end of the day it's your business. If they come back the second time you should give less information than you provided on their first visit, but tell them you can give them a more thorough explanation if they booked an appointment. Alternatively stop giving away free information. When someone calls/comes to see you with their ...


10

Per hour, my rule is, I bill only for time spent, and for all of time spent. Build in a buffer to your estimate, but if it is an estimate, be prepared to invoice above or below. In general when I produce an hourly estimate I put in a buffer of 50-100% depending on unknowns because if I can bill under estimate customers are happy. Some times, customers ...


10

First, I usually do hourly up to x hours or just hourly, but I do some fixed bids too. In general fixed bids are preferable for a customer if the scope is very clear, and they are preferable for the consultant if the price is higher than the hourly would be. I would say that most of my fixed bid work brings me more per hour than my hourly rate. What I am ...


10

The contractor is absolutely right. Why? Putting the website on your server, he's giving you a code or moving the code to your server. And the code is delivered in the end, unless you're paying your contractor hourly. Since we work remotely, we cannot give the code to the client, before we are fully paid for the work (again unless we're paid hourly in which ...


10

This client may have never intended for you to do the work shown in the initial links sent. Perhaps the client is hoping that you will take the bait and actually commit to doing much harder work without changing your price. I'd inform the client that because of a change in scope, you have to change your price. Don't worry about what happens in the future, ...


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