31

Is it unprofessional - Yes. Should you skip a lucrative opportunity - probably not. Now, these two things are in collision, as they always are. The only thing you can do here is work the lucrative job in regular work hours, and do the bargain job after that (probably late afternoon and night). So paid jobs are done in the prime time, and low-paid jobs after....


23

What you are dealing with is known as a "Sales Pipeline." (Step through the Slideshow) And you are getting the steps out of order. That's what's causing your frustration. As a tech person (like myself), it frustrates you because we're used to a "Here's my problem. Fix it for money." view of the world. The reason that we think this way is that we are ...


18

May I guess. He approached to you saying if you do this for bargain, you will get more work? Yes you will get more work, 5 times more complex for 50% more money - $150 in your case. Any serious client will let you first do 1 project, and only then he will talk about more work. Because if they immediately say that they have more work, even a bad contractor ...


15

I'll keep my answer simple. If a client is asking for a custom full-fledged CMS/e-commerce site for a $100, as a freelancer, you should read that as "this person is a complete waste of my time," and move on. Of course, don't say that to the client. To the client, be very professional and polite. Thank them for considering you, apologize for not being ...


15

TL;DR: In any case, I would suggest to stay positive. Try to turn the things like you are not raising a conflict of interests by asking something for yourself. Try to convince your client that you have the same goals, to make the job done at minimal cost and maximum quality. Also, resolving an existing problem prior doing anything else seems to be a good ...


15

Wasting a day hoping for work to arrive if you have other work lined up is on you. Don't start any work before you have a signed contract. If they sign a contract, the likelihood that they are serious is already much higher than before. Ask for early payment for the first piece of work. Once they start paying you, the likelihood that they are serious is ...


13

I'm in web development myself, my answers: If money seems to be the only important thing, or you're being compared to India I've frequently had discussions with potential customers that in the end boiled down to that they didn't like our rates, either because "competitor X is 10% cheaper" or "I could outsource this to India for half your price". On both ...


12

it could be that he is just under time pressure and while the change in commitments is unfortunate, future opportunities may make up for it This is your statement from above. This tells me that you're more concerned about how your client's business is going than you are about your OWN business. How you run your business should NEVER be conditional to how ...


11

I don't understand the dilemma. "Sorry, I'm not available to work on your project." Should be more than sufficient. If asked again, "Sorry, I'm just not available." If pressed... "Sorry, I just don't have available resources at the present time." There's no reason you need to justify not doing the work. They aren't your "boss" if you're freelancing. You ...


10

This client may have never intended for you to do the work shown in the initial links sent. Perhaps the client is hoping that you will take the bait and actually commit to doing much harder work without changing your price. I'd inform the client that because of a change in scope, you have to change your price. Don't worry about what happens in the future, ...


10

I think it would be reasonable, since you're only on a three month contract with no specified goals besides "do some work" (my favorite kind of contractual agreement btw), to give them a heads up that you're going to be decreasing your involvement. Here's where you could offer some creative solutions. Since the hours that you spend on things is not ...


8

First off, calm down. Nothing good comes from those who panic, and don't think things thoroughly! Now that you're calmed down, I want you to Ask a Duck. Pretend your duck is the client, and they are asking you questions about a website. What seems important? Write it down! What seems like an asinine request? Ignore it! You may look silly, but I promise it ...


8

First, as more of a philosophical angle, it's better to look for high value client, not high value projects. [Quick note, I've not really used UpWork since the departure from oDesk, and I'm not at all a fan of the upcharges just to get better access to data.] First, your specific questions: If a project has too many proposals already, should I not ...


8

This answer is based upon my 20 years experience of having legal departments review testimonials and approve/refuse edits. I am not a lawyer though. Almost every piece I design has many, many testimonials and they almost always go through that company's legal department for review. So, while I'm not a lawyer myself, I've gotten familiar with what I can and ...


7

There are plenty of people that have 'grand visions' and limited resources. They'll get going on something and then realize either that they can't afford to use it the way they intended, it's going to take longer to do then they expected, or that their understanding of what they needed was incomplete and they really need something else. This goes on all ...


6

This is a sales meeting. It's for you to find out what he wants, for him to get a sense of who you are, and for both of you to decide whether his requirements and your skills are a good match and whether you want to work with one another. To that extent, it's a little bit social, a little bit techy, and a little bit business. Your goal for the meeting ...


6

Contracts and deposits. Deposit paid before any work starts. If the work is too short for a contract, then payment in full before work starts. And still write a contract. Rush work? There's no such thing. When did their lack of planning become your emergency? If the client really wants the job 'yesterday', they'll have all the material you need, and they'...


5

As a freelance UX designer, here's my perspective: Advantages of long-term clients: Good source of steady income. Good source of recommendations. Those who give you testimonials will know you well. You don't have to prospect for new work as often. You will feel more like a part of their company but still have the advantages of freelancing like being ...


5

There are advantages to long-term clients as well as disadvantages. The advantages I have found to long-term clients are: Lower cost of sales/marketing (the customer already knows and trusts me and so it is easier to convince them to select me for a new project) Lower risk (you already know you can work successfully with the customer, they have proven ...


5

If the client doesn't respect me during the bidding process, the client is not worth the trouble. Drama during the bidding process is a huge red flag. In general drama in the bidding process is a sign to walk away and not even bid. Chances are, if the project starts off this way, it will be stressful all the way through and everyone will end up unhappy. ...


5

Impossible in 99% of cases! For a long time, I am of the opinion that 4 of 5 estimations I make are done for other freelancers. At first, I was furious and could not know what to do, but then I sat and thought about it. What is an estimation in its essence? It a synergy of YOUR skills, experience and ability to solve problems. So if I estimate some project ...


5

I know this isn't the best answer, but you should essentially never "start" working for free. I know the saying goes "hardest part of freelance is the 'free'". Be professional, but also understand that this is business. When they ask for a "nugget" as you put it, simply state something professional. For example: "I will be happy to give you this ...


5

You'd be better off trying to pick up some work through recruiters than ridiculously lowering your rate. The longer you stay in projects where the client doesn't value your work, the more annoyed you'll become because the client will continue to be unreasonable. Usually, this type of client is clueless and will work on the premise that you deliver ...


4

The first thing I look at is are they willing to pay what it really costs. Don't be afraid to give a price higher than a competitor if it is what it costs to do it right and don't be afraid to walk away from a deal if they continue to push for a lower price because of the low baller. The most extreme example I have was one with a company that wanted to ...


4

Please bear with me as I set up and use this analogy from my days as a real estate agent: In the US, Real Estate Agents typically get paid a commission when escrow closes, that is, when the transaction is complete and the property is sold. It usually takes around 30 days and it's not uncommon for a deal to fall-through or cancel even at the last minute. ...


4

I am going to assume that as it currently stands, you are both 50% with your decisions. This is definitely going to be hard to handle initially without some sort of system in place. The earlier it can be addressed, the better. One caution when working with others on the same level is that if you are friends, you need to put your friendship on hold sometimes ...


4

Does the above seem like an appropriate communication? It's fine. Practices vary, but your decisions and path aren't out of the ordinary, and are quite generous (though your fee per week late is exceptional!). Is anything missing from it? A contract, and written communications. The real problem here is that he doesn't pay attention to email, and ...


4

You will probably hear a lot of suggestions, but they will eventually lead to the client itself. They are either willing to learn new things or not. And there is nothing you can do about it. Now, what you can do it make an initial conversation with them asking them about their technical knowledge of the area in question. I personally do not do that as I ...


4

There are two types of declines at issue here: Work you're offered in response to your marketing/self-promotion efforts, and work that comes to you unsolicited. The second case is easy. As has been stated, you're always at liberty to decline work by saying that you don't have the time. The other is a little more delicate. If you're soliciting work, and ...


4

There are many screening techniques but before I go in further details please bear in mind one aspect of the problem: "By doing this (deep-screening) you risk loosing potential customers which is, there is always a good and a bad in every chosen approach." Here are some vetting techniques: When you receive a new request, make them work for it. Ask for some ...


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