19

In my experience, when prospective clients specify technologies, they're coming more from a place of having heard of others using them successfully, rather than of having considered the use case and made an educated and informed decision. I talk to them about why they chose the tools they did. If their reasoning is sound, awesome. If not, I remind them that ...


15

Client wants me to steal secret plans from the CEO of his competing company. He sent an email today detailing where I can find the plans, how to break into his offices, and a schedule for when the break in would be best. Do you think you are blameless if you break in and steal the plans? If the police arrest you for breaking into the office, do you think ...


8

Since you're looking to provide a paid app, it's certainly hard to compete price-wise with a free app (but oddly enough, not impossible; I'll explain later). In that case, you need to compete in a different arena: quality. When you're developing your app, take care to make sure that everything looks fantastic. Make sure it works, make sure it's well-...


7

Under no circumstances should you allow yourself to have unlimited liability. The phrase used in contracts to prevent this is usually of the form: 'You shall indemnify and hold the Developer harmless for all losses or damage resulting directly or indirectly from the Software' However, my contract is just an extended version of Contract Killer 3 (also on ...


6

If YOU own the code, then YOU are the only one who gets to keep the source code. Clients get installation files, compiled or otherwise. And a written licensing agreement that asserts your rights over the product and says what they can and cannot do with those install files. Don't skimp on the licensing part - write it once, write it well, and then you can ...


6

If, after talking with them at length about their requirements and how well their requirements mesh with my capabilities, they still choose a platform that isn't as well suited to their project as others, I make sure to include assumptions in my proposal that cover problems I anticipate I might have. I'll have made sure to tell them that some requirements, ...


6

Pivot. If you find a competitor that is much bigger than you (Google), or doing what you are doing better or for free (open source)- a very good option is to pivot. Perform a deep analysis of the competitive landscape and understand all the products in your space. Each product will have strengths and weaknesses. You want to find a niche where you can ...


6

I think you should shoot high. The sky is the limit for you. You already have a lot of skills for your age. I think it is totally possible to make some money with freelance web development to pay for some of your classes, however, I think there are a few things you need to consider when making this decision. Before choosing a route, I would consider ...


6

Why do you allow being treated like this? "Calling me every 2h and messaging every 15min + threatening" - WFT bro???? I would never, NEVER, N E V E R allow being treated like this. Now, aside of this, the client obviously wanted a lot of free work and he found fertile ground to impose his requests for free. At this point, you only have 2 options: break ...


5

I faced a similar situation. I developed a test data generator while there is a lot of such product out there. Some are free others are paid. It was 8 years ago and me and my product are still there and most of my competitors as well. I think that people looking for free stuff will never pay - whatever the reason why they don't want to pay. Let them be ...


5

You'll want a sort of retainer agreement. There are other answers that explain about retainers, and when to use them. Essentially, they want you available for a long while, which gives you some security (which can be good, it could be bad). Do not fall into the trap of it becoming just a job, with them just paying you as a contractor but expecting you to ...


5

First of all, it depends on the license of software. A 'Perpetual License for Use' is non-descriptive. You must define 'use' (i.e. use to sell, use to re-distribute, use to modify are all possible interpretations of the word 'use'). It is quite common at law that when there is ambiguous wording of the contract, the courts will deem that to be the fault ...


5

You generate executables. NEVER give up your source code (and likewise, rights to your repository) unless that's what the client is paying for.


5

Here's a question for you - what sort of structure are you providing to encourage your people to perform? Do you have a mutually beneficial and understood verbal or written contract that specifies who is responsible for what, what kind of work each person is responsible to put in to be counted as a full participant, and what kind of rewards they can expect ...


5

This really tells us nothing about what the application will actually do or its complexity. AND we're not here to do that for you anyway. You can go about this two ways: 1) Pick an hourly rate that you're comfortable with, and charge that. The client has the flexibility to tailor the requirements in whatever fashion, and you don't worry about that piece ...


5

Pricing is notoriously difficult as it depends on several factors: Your own desired hourly rate What the client typically pays The perceived value to the client Whether the project is similar to anything you have undertaken before Whether the client has clear requirements or not Whether giving a discount most probably will lead to more work While you ...


5

Ah, the good old fashioned "stuff works and never breaks" assumption from a non-it manager. First up, DBA requirements. Advise them that if they do not wish to procure DBA support from you, they will need to provide their own DBA. Ensure that your terms of service/sla/etc do not include DBA support as part of the package. Next, general support ...


5

Since you are using Upwork I suggest you try to resolve this with the client. This way both will be happy. You made a big mistake. You continued to work although you knew that something is not possible to implement. You should have stand by your opinion at the beginning telling client that you are the expert in that field, not him. If he insists that ...


4

For remote work, the types of applications I've found most useful are: Chat, IRC or Skype communication software. These allow real time communication amongst team members, and most can allow you to bring your group together for a virtual "meeting." Screen share is very helpful, so try to pick one that's got that feature. These are almost all free, or have ...


4

A way to do it, is to estimate the value of the CPU processing time against your gross margin on a regular (monthly/yearly) basis, versus a previous period (month/year). Example: Last month you've made $10.000. You have 10 CPUs. 5 of them account for 125 hours of CPU processing time/month. You've estimated that the CPUs processing time ...


4

If you really need the job I'd look for comparable software that would be legal to use. Personally, I'd drop the project like a hot potatoe.


4

No. If you're charging less than "market", then clients may get the impression that you're taking on work for cheap because you're not very good at it. The other side of the situation is that your 9-to-5 may not last forever, and if you have an opportunity to transition your side gig into full-time type hours, it's obviously not going to yield as much as ...


3

Well, you're sounding like you want to go down the entrepreneurial path. Good luck with that. I used to have similar questions when I started out as an internet entrepreneur. Yes, you can make money while giving away your software for free. Take WordPress for example. Among all the CMS softwares, it has the highest market share. The software is open-source,...


3

Toggl works for me for several years. It is an online service but they have a desktop app (as well as Android/iOS apps); Their desktop app detects the inactivity and asks you to keep or drop this time. The basic functionality is free and I like their online reporting features. They also allow downloading CSVs with your time and tasks; I used to write ...


3

It depends on the license. You may provide only binaries. I usually license under the GPL and deliver a source tarball. This is a very large field and it depends on the specifics of the license and the license offer. Another point is that you may want to license it under various terms and sell an additional license for the source code. In this case you ...


3

Good question, with such a small user base one cannot do many experiments. There is a fine line between "covering your costs" and "making a profit". Users tend to accept the first but tend to get unhappy about the second. If you decide on asking a price then you want to explain your decision accordingly. With a good reasoning you can charge a price that ...


3

You are not REQUIRED to state terms and conditions except that in the case with Ebay, you must state your refund policy. Generally, terms and conditions are there to protect you from getting sued. You typically see this labelled as "License Agreement" in software installers. As long as it's in your installer, I think (I'm not an attorney) you'd be covered....


3

I doubt there is a standard ratio. Unless your product is unique, its pricing and licensing structure should be designed to compete with similar products and any alternatives to using those products. After researching and developing a pricing structure, ask a few of your existing customers what they think about your proposal and whether they would subscribe ...


3

How do I go about getting a group of members together for no pay, but a share of the profit if we receive any. Realistically, you either bring along a bunch of close friends who are experts in the field and passionate enough about the idea to take a huge financial risk on it, "hire" some naïve and incompetent college students and string them along ...


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