Hot answers tagged

21

Short answer, you don't. Longer answer ... Speaking poorly of other freelancers will reflect more upon you than on them. Yes, that seems backwards, but it's not. If you complain about other people it is you who will gain a reputation as being difficult or not being a "team player". You're the squeaky wheel who will garner all the bad attention... not the ...


16

Your client is a person, too. They have been late or missed deadlines at some point in their life as well. Unless you have a really aggressive client, they should understand that things happen. And if they are extremely upset about it.. they might not be the type of client you wan to keep around. I take a very relaxed approach to communicating with clients. ...


11

Believe it or not, I often find if a client is overly prepared they might be difficult to deal with. I have to remind those clients that I do this for a living, and they are in a completely different industry which has nothing to do with building websites. This is pretty subjective but some other red flags I see often are: "I think this should take about X ...


11

There are obvious benefits to the freelancer if payment is made up front: No chasing the money at the end Harder for a client to cancel the project if they've already paid There is also a big risk to the client: What happens if the freelancer dies or disappears before the end of the project? I have seen 2 reasons why clients are willing to take that risk:...


9

In your Scope of Work contract, you should always have a clause about unforeseen circumstances that could introduce delays. I come from the IT Services industry, and that is one thing we always mention: The absolute minimum completion time/date, and the potential end time/date, for anything that may come up. I get to deal with almost a thousand clients ...


8

I typically offer free support on a software development project for 60 or 90 days after the project goes live. After that, I offer fixed-fee monthly support to clients. This support includes bug fixes, answering questions and general troubleshooting via email. I generally find that my customers appreciate knowing that they can call and I won't be starting ...


6

In general prompt communication is a good thing. You should let your client know as soon as possible what the problems are so that if chances need to be made to the work plan/scope of work, they can de done in a way you both can live with. Maybe they will decide it is too much trouble and pay you for work done. Maybe they will decide they want to expand ...


6

I suggest two options: 1) You could create a questionnaire for potential clients that gathers a lot of information that you know you will need on most web sites. Yes, you may need more details, but you could try to gather the first round of information without investing a lot of time in the effort. (Your questionnaire could ask about if the site needs an e-...


5

As someone who has worked as a freelancer while working full time, I've come to know that I just simply can't move as quickly as someone who works full time as a freelancer and who has no other work obligations. As a result, when someone claims they need something in a shorter time period than what I can possibly meet, then this is a red flag that this isn't ...


5

When you say freelancing, are you talking about working part time from home, or working for a period of weeks or months possibly on the clients site? I've been a contractor/consultant since 1994 and based on my experience, more money and more work is available if you are prepared to work on a clients site. It will also pay considerably more. I've been in ...


5

"Test projects" are never acceptable to me. If you hire a contractor to refurbish your kitchen... do you expect him to do a "test project" by refurbishing your bathroom first? If you want a mechanic to tune up your car.... do you expect him/her to complete a "test project" by rotating your tires first? In my world there is no such thing as a "test project"...


5

Unless the client made assurances to be immediately contactable during this period, they have no urgent need to respond. There are anumber of things that might be diverting their attention. I would suggest allowing at least 72 hours before following up.


4

Accept the money and keep this client. The client may recognize that at the beginning, he asked for 10 requirements, but over time he realized that he was really asking for 100. Accordingly, he's trying to pay you what you're worth. YOU, on the other hand, seem to be very inexperienced. Not so much in your technical expertise but in your limited ...


4

A related thing happened to me too, the difference was that the other part was a web agency, they tried to put me in bad light with the client also with sort of sabotage actions, trusting on the fact that the client could be technically uneducated. It was a difficult moment between me, the client and that external company (you can read the story here if you ...


3

Some of the other answers have mentioned this but I want to clarify it: Define Free What does your free support period offer: Bug Fixes Minor Changes to UI Major Changes to UI (languages added for example) Dependant on system, installing on more servers or computers in different locations Changes to functions (major or minor) Training (no matter how ...


3

Remember that nothing in this world is free, no matter what the price tag itself says. If I am selling a program, and I'm expected to give support, I would build that cost into the cost of developing the product, but likely at a reduced price for the support (in the event they don't use it, they shouldn't feel ripped off). It's going to vary greatly on the ...


3

I have limited experience but going through something similar at the moment. Any new clients I receive will be politely asked if they know exactly what they want and if the have a relatively detailed requirement spec and concerns as to how things will work. It is important to see if they have any concerns because this highlights the fact they have thought ...


3

In regards to your question about including it in your CV: Absolutely! Your commute (or lack thereof) does not take away from the fact that you performed a service for your client. When including it though, it should either fill a time gap, or highlight some special skill or knowledge you posses, and not just be there to 'pad' your CV.


3

1) You may try Assembla which is pretty much you'll ever need. You as admin can filter tabs your client can see. For example, leaving him Tasks tab only where he can make tasks for you, make comments on each, etc. 2) The other one is to try Trello which is visually richer. Yet again, he may not like drag&drop things, popups etc. So maybe Assembla may be ...


3

Why not, if you were told that you will be contacted? You are a professional and you probably reserved some of your time for this client. I would contact her telling that I am making work plans for this month (or next) and if she could update me if I shall still keep some time reserved for her. This will be professional and also pushy in a good way. The ...


3

I have been a part time freelancer for the last 6 years. Nowadays it is very hard to get new work. Recently I started using this chrome extension, which is very helpful for me to get new job notifications instantly from guru.com. So that I can place my bid before someone else applies for the same job. And it saves me time because I don't want to refresh the ...


3

You should be applying for fewer jobs. It's not about the quantity of jobs available. You need to find the jobs which suit your skills, your experience, and your expected rates - and then focus more on your applications for those jobs. Here's what I would do: Go to several of your favorite freelancing sites and setup keyword searches. Don't just browse ...


3

Both the answers provided here are good. Here's my take. We don't always get to pick the members on our team. In this context "John" is your team member. What you need to do is figure out how to help "John" help you! Since your client chose both you and "John" it is in your best interests to prove that you can function in this environment. Casting ...


3

I'd take it to mean that the potential client is seeking three quotes to ensure that the accepted quote is competitive. The cheapest quote needn't be the winning quote as long as the winning quote persuades the client they are getting good value for money.


3

It means that your potential customer requires 3 quotes before making a decision about outsourcing any work. (As Neil above stated) If you are quoting, and you have not actually met and talked to this customer, do not spend any time on it at all. Just knock up your normal quote paperwork with a relevant opening paragraph and move on. In reality companies ...


3

A project on which I'm involved uses a 3rd-party library among its Maven dependencies. What the 3rd party did was to set up a Maven repository on the public Internet, protected by a username and password. My company pays a yearly fee to the 3rd party to have access to their Maven repo. We configure their repository in our Maven settings file, and that's it. ...


3

My answer is purely anecdotal, but I am a software dev who worked for a distributer that sold civil engineering software. (It was an application rather than an API/library.) The model was a bit of a gray area: they would sell licenses per user but for larger businesses they would make per-business agreements that would mean they could get X licenses for Y ...


2

Yes. You are providing a service, investing your time ensure your clients are serious by investing their money. I ask for 50% deposit before any work, never had anyone dispute that.


2

You have to make sure that the client pays some amount in advance. there is every reason that the client may decline the advance. So as a general level of strategy, before asking for the advance put up a mark in the client by establishing your credentials. Talking about your previous websites, deeds you have done , demonstrating your work etc.


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