32

(A bit on my background: I'm a PHP developer, and I do all my hourly contracting through oDesk - I have been doing that for quite a while now.) First, getting started can take some time. Not having a reputation / experience contracting is similar to not having a reputation / experience being a PHP developer. Don't be discouraged; I mention this, so you won'...


25

Where do I start? Why I almost didn't read this question? Why most of guys on this group probably skipped reading your question? Why I would not hire you based on this bid? Bad English You addressed the client as "freelancer" you said nothing about the project and how you would approach to it bad formatting - no extra space Clients have 3s to like or ...


12

Note that there is a distinction between "project" and "client". Large clients can have small projects and vice versa. More/Smaller Clients: Pros include: you are diversified and therefore, the loss of one client will have less impact on your work/cash flow getting into more clients should increase your marketability because of your greater visibility ...


12

I always cringe a bit when I hear a freelancer ask a perspective client "What's your budget?" Isn't that the same as asking "How much can I get away with charging you?" Or "Can I charge you more than I normally would without you realizing it?" For me, there is absolutely no reason I need to know the client's budget. I need to know the breadth, scope, and ...


12

Believe it or not, I often find if a client is overly prepared they might be difficult to deal with. I have to remind those clients that I do this for a living, and they are in a completely different industry which has nothing to do with building websites. This is pretty subjective but some other red flags I see often are: "I think this should take about X ...


12

Don't provide anything. Avoid these clients. Seriously, don't even consider working for clients such as this. If the client can not take the time to at least attempt to describe their issue as thoroughly as possible, especially in a written description, then they will not take the time to interact with you appropriately. A lack of any detail shows a clear ...


11

In the first place, PHP is the toughest to get jobs in since there are simply too many people. So, I have a couple of advices for you: Tech advice Don't just offer PHP since competition is too high. Specialize yourself in something narrower like Symphony or other PHP things. You are a new guy, so offering something that a client can get from the ...


8

In general you should keep in mind that a quotation is a formal offer and may be deemed to form a contract if accepted. Therefore you should make sure you are clear about what you are providing and the terms under which you are providing it. In general, anything applicable to the invoice is applicable to a quotation except for things like payments already ...


7

When client does not offer budget, he either wants to see if you can do it cheaper that he's ready to pay or he simply does not know the costs. So you can do these things. Analyze the work, count how many work hours it will take, then multiply work hours with your hourly rate, and you will get your price When you are sure how many days/weeks it will take ...


7

I'm going to assume that you're asking because you're new to either Upwork or freelancing altogether. There are many reasons as to why you might not be hired often. Personally, I used to get hired on 90% of jobs I applied for. Now I don't use Upwork too often as I personally feel as though the quality of freelancers and clients has dropped significantly. I ...


6

I started freelancing 2 months ago with Android development and landed my first job in just 1 day. The key points are: you are new and probably don't have a lot of experience. So, to have a good offer that the client will take into consideration you should ask for less money that most of the people bidding. This way, even if you don't have experience people ...


6

Having been down this path before, here are some thoughts: Resume Since you are not an established contractor and likely can not share any work from your current employer, your resume is the next best thing to show to the company that you are qualified to do the work. While your brother may have vouched for you, the managers involved will need to see ...


6

Getting hired on Upwork is easy and hard at the same time. Most of the freelancers have everything perfect from the 100% profiles, good in their field (Skills are there) etc. From what I have come across, most freelancers either have no portfolio/ samples to back their cover letter, clients are looking for freelancers with work history and or the ...


5

What I did was I offered to do something pro-bono for a community- or non-profit-organization that I believe in. Even if it's given to them, it fills up my portfolio, and I'm remembered. Great, you say, free work when I'm trying to get paid! How would that help? In my experience, about 80-90% of the adults involved in these type of organizations are nice ...


5

Here are the factors I use when determining a fixed price for clients: My estimated time to complete the work My confidence level in that estimate (is it similar to work I've done before? Then I might have more confidence. If it isn't similar, or has other risk factors, then I might charge more on a fixed bid to mitigate that risk.) Any third party tools or ...


5

If it were me, I'd ignore the outside contractor entirely unless specifically asked. I would not intentionally note anything the outside contractor is suggesting and I wouldn't "build in" counter arguments to my bid. I would detail what I feel is the proper way to proceed and why. Giving a solid argument on your own merits rather than bouncing them off of ...


5

I know this isn't the best answer, but you should essentially never "start" working for free. I know the saying goes "hardest part of freelance is the 'free'". Be professional, but also understand that this is business. When they ask for a "nugget" as you put it, simply state something professional. For example: "I will be happy to give you this ...


5

"Test projects" are never acceptable to me. If you hire a contractor to refurbish your kitchen... do you expect him to do a "test project" by refurbishing your bathroom first? If you want a mechanic to tune up your car.... do you expect him/her to complete a "test project" by rotating your tires first? In my world there is no such thing as a "test project"...


4

I like working on a mix of larger and smaller projects to even out work flow and cash flow. Sometimes, you may be waiting on clients for a decision or other reasons and it's good to have something else to be going on with. A mix of projects means you will always have something to be going on with. Taking on too many large projects can mean waiting a while ...


4

Here's what I would do. Contribute to Open Source projects. Some open source projects have a lot of visibility. Do great work. Companies who's looking to hire/outsource would want to bring someone with experiences on board. Talk to local business/SME. The local SME community are largely under served. Start small. Provide excellent support. They will almost ...


4

I don't know specifically about freelancer.com but here's some good tips for these types of sites: Start with a few simple jobs to get some feedback Make your 'about me' type page well written and honest Bid for jobs with honest pricing, don't go too low and don't bid on projects that don't pay what you think is an acceptable amount for the work involved ...


4

Even if your client suggests a budget, you still need to make the kind of estimate that others have suggested. Some clients have no idea what it will take to do a project and some do but will try to get a low ball price from you. You need to be aware, before you sign something, of what you think it will actually cost you in hours to do his job. Some jobs (...


4

I just went through this with a client. I had to think about what was said in the discovery meeting and then also think about how the client conducts business and where their revenue comes from. I went through a few bullet point lists that gave me some priorities for the business and a few options for how a customer might go through a process of paying for ...


4

Well you already answered to the first part of your question by yourself. There is no real way to tell the budget. Besides that, in my experience I always tell the client without any requirements which should be at least a small scope statement. In addition you could provide your customer with examples or "price ranges" from your existing portfolio. ...


4

It all boils down to one thing, do you believe in the project? Accepting equity is always a bet, because so many things can go wrong at every step of the startup way. The moment you accept, you are becoming an active part of the company as opposed to just a contractor, and you have to be ready to push the project ahead with all you can give, because your ...


4

When you say freelancing, are you talking about working part time from home, or working for a period of weeks or months possibly on the clients site? I've been a contractor/consultant since 1994 and based on my experience, more money and more work is available if you are prepared to work on a clients site. It will also pay considerably more. I've been in ...


4

The clients who post projects in freelancer sites do not care to give the details of the app in the project description. I have seen 90% of the clients not describing the requirements. They just say "I need an android app" or "I need an app to be build soon". But here freelancers gets confused weather to bid or not. I am giving these suggestions assuming ...


4

It means that your potential customer requires 3 quotes before making a decision about outsourcing any work. (As Neil above stated) If you are quoting, and you have not actually met and talked to this customer, do not spend any time on it at all. Just knock up your normal quote paperwork with a relevant opening paragraph and move on. In reality companies ...


3

I wouldn't lower your rate. For a long time I always under sold myself. It's easy to do when you really want to make sure you get a contract. But if it's a really big project and your portfolio speaks for itself, then charge 30k with confidence! Don't undercharge and get locked into a lower rate than you are worth. We sometimes throw in a "we will give ...


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