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41

Careful. What you're proposing (charging some amount extra simply because you're the only person who possesses a backup) sounds quite close to extortion. Bear in mind that the data that you have is actually the property of your customer. If you made and retained the backup 'incidentally' without their knowledge or express consent, you likely ran afoul ...


17

If I intend to charge at all for a minor thing, I charge a minimum of 15 minutes. Like you, I traditionally won't charge for anything exceptionally minor. However if the requests become more frequent, then I can't allow my workflow to be interrupted repeatedly for many "minor" things. In my experience, there's no such thing as a "30 second" or "1 minute" ...


15

Okay, after reading all the answers and comments here, I would like to add a few additional points to my answer. First off, as freelancers we normally trade our time for money. So it seems natural to base the price of a monthly service off of how much time it takes us to do it. And that might be fine if you're just getting started, but like Joe (OP) said, ...


15

Even if you sell commodities, you are allowed to give bargains to chosen groups of customers. It's fully up to your decision whom you give a discount. You can target your promotions to the arbitrarily chosen group of person. It's your marketing strategy. I don't know any legal system, that would allow free entrepreneurship and in the same time restrict ...


14

Simple, explain that it is costing you more in { time | resources | parts | tools } to continue operating the way you have been. Inflation happens, period. What I did for my pricing model is that my F&F rate (Friends and Family) is always $20/hr less than what I charge regular clients. Option two if you do not feel like raising your prices is offer to ...


12

I asked the same question myself 4-5 years ago when I started freelancing. I will tell you what I did and how can you NOT make the same mistakes as myself. Since I will not do marketing for any freelancing site, I will not mention a specific names (and recommending would also be against the rules of this group). I first used Google to see which freelancing ...


11

You're pricing yourself into the ground. @ChrisForrence has great points and I'll add a few more... You will NEVER and I repeat NEVER profit from charging $350 for a site. Let's break this down from the first meeting... First meeting. Needs assessment - 1 hour Contract writing - 2 hours Concept development (for a basic site) - 2 hours Second meeting. ...


10

It's not uncommon for freelance developers to charge double-time for last minute, urgent items. In fact, I recommend it. As freelancers, we often get 'last minute urgent work' through no fault of our own. In effect, charging a premium for 'urgent' work is a good way to train clients to respect your worth and your time - but also provide an option that will ...


10

Instead of lowering your rates, offer the potential client a reduced feature set or smaller scope of work for the the amount of money he can afford. Tell the client "I charge $X for A, but I can do B (which is a Subset of A) for $Y" That way, you are still getting what you deserve to get paid. If the client is happy with the smaller project, he can ...


10

You've got it backwards. The market hasn't evolved. These people are coming to you because you are cheap -- maybe you're actually undercutting what you could be actually making because you're too afraid to speak up. If you need to raise prices, RAISE PRICES. But you must change your mindset. Some of your acquaintances will have a problem with it. DON'T ...


9

First you need to understand some basics of discrimination law in your area. I can only speak to the United States generally (and will note some exceptions below). In general, in the United States, antidiscrimination law came about because of the experience of segregation, and it attempts to balance the legitimate needs of businesses with the general ...


9

When a client asks you for fixed-price, in essence the client is asking you to absorb the risk. Unless your specs are done in mind boggling detail, the client is going to assume that anything caused by poor communication is a cost that you are going to absorb. So here's a fair exchange: if the client has the capability to alter the requirements, then you ...


8

Unfortunately, I don't believe such a site exists, and I wouldn't expect it to be accurate either. If you are working on projects, they are usually a per-project cost, which changes as the scope changes, with every single project. A calculator won't be able to detect this. It also will not be able to measure you skill level, or how much time it will take ...


8

Your friend has good reasoning. Here's a few reasons why charging more will be better for you: Slow periods: One reason to charge more is to be able to live off of past earnings. If you have four projects this month and none next month, that second month is going to seem pretty darn lean, especially for living in New York City! Charging $400 ...


8

The data does not belong to you, and demanding money for release of the data as such may (ignoring the moral issue) easily be qualified as extortion, with all kinds of civil and criminal unpleasantries - so if you really want to go that way, then ask a lawyer first for your own safety. That being said, a fair price for the task of you restoring backups will ...


8

I have been doing the web design and development business for the last 8 years and One of my biggest learning & mistake is, reducing the cost to get projects. You should never & never do that. If you do it, this is going to be your first step towards failure. When you take projects for lower cost, Why is it first step towards your failure ? Low ...


8

Personal opinion... don't engage too much. If the relationship is damaged, then it's damaged. Get paid and move on. Too much discussion will only inflame issues. In addition, any reduction not cited in the contract shows your willingness to not adhere to the contract itself. This could be interpreted as a failure in the agreement from its inception. The ...


7

I recommend you start by doing a Google/Bing search for the term "crowdsourcing" and see what shows up at the top of the organic search results - not the ads. Then perform another search of the site you're interested in joining, including certain keywords like "scam, ripoff, spam, lawsuit, etc...". If a site is shady, it usually shows up in search. Keep in ...


7

There is no formula for magically determining the number of hours a task will take based on complexity. Rather than agreeing to a fixed price, you might want to break your project into milestones and give an estimate of the number of hours between milestones, and charge hourly. This is most important especially when you consider the fact that as you finish ...


7

Creating a price based on your hourly rate is certainly a valid one and the one that most groups that maintain open-source projects take. However, instead of asking them how many hours they'd like to sponsor, I'd suggest using a tiered pricing model and asking what level they'd like to contribute at. Why tiered pricing? It allows companies to choose from a ...


7

The person requesting your services asked this: Hey, person X told me that you designed her website. I'm starting up a company, how much would you charge me for something similar to that site? Do not take that initial contact literally. Interpret it like this: Blah, blah, blah you did work for someone else & I would like to hire you blah, ...


7

First off, charge by the hour. Without knowing a great many details about your expectations for payment, level of skill, customer expectations, graphics, whatever, it's impossible to come up with an accurate estimate that is going to make you happy. Here's the deal though...you are in the same position. Fixed price gigs almost always (in my 30 years of ...


7

Well this is really opinion-based. But there are some aspects to be aware of. Some clients will see your failure to invoice as an "ok" to send you more changes then act shocked when you want to be paid. For this reason you need to be a bit careful with free services. Clients like this just try and roll over you and then start becoming very difficult when ...


7

Neoflash, If a customer's #1 motivation is to get a service done as cheaply as possible, then you can't fix that whether you are at the pre-service stage, performing the service, or done with it. You just got lucky that it didn't come out sooner. I hope you've cashed any checks from this customer and aren't sitting on them! That same customer can't call ...


6

I suggest two options: 1) You could create a questionnaire for potential clients that gathers a lot of information that you know you will need on most web sites. Yes, you may need more details, but you could try to gather the first round of information without investing a lot of time in the effort. (Your questionnaire could ask about if the site needs an e-...


6

Don't charge him for a small task. But if you can accumulate multiple small tasks done in 1 month into a couple of work hours, then notify the client, explain to him how much time those tasks took you, and ask to be paid. If those tasks are really happening once a month, and obviously it would not be "nice" to charge your client at the end of a year, set a ...


6

I myself am from Europe. I think Easter is at the same time for many people. Anyway. Your client is negotiating with you. And you should do the same with him. €700 is a good start and in this case you should expect €600. It will be OK to deliver until Saturday (April 19, 2014) only if you get at least €600. And, for the future, you should keep an eye on ...


6

Having been down this path before, here are some thoughts: Resume Since you are not an established contractor and likely can not share any work from your current employer, your resume is the next best thing to show to the company that you are qualified to do the work. While your brother may have vouched for you, the managers involved will need to see ...


6

Go hourly whenever you can. It will solve all these issues. Then clients do want fixed-price projects and in such cases do a few things: Add MAX number of changes you will undertake for free in terms of colors, fonts, effects and other such things. this does not apply to bug fixing. Calculate some percentage as extra time which will cover or unplanned ...


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