Hot answers tagged

23

There are several categories of post-changes. They should be treated in different manner, unless your agreement with the project owner states otherwise. So, you have completed a project and, trying to satisfy your client, you offered... Little Updates and Things Bugs. As your software product is running and users are using it, they will inevitably find ...


16

Here's my insight. Working as a freelancer makes you control your time more thoroughly and prioritize the projects and tasks you are currently involved in. So, for me, "marking" the project as complete means that me and my customer should sit and discuss our future plans: are we going to make updates (software updates, bug fixes, other improvements), what ...


13

To be honest, my view is slightly different. Instead of a rule of always disclosing, I think you have two issues. First is a question of customer priorities and the second is one of professionalism. I think if you follow my rules the answer will be usually to disclose but do so carefully. The issue of customer priorities is the first one. Reporting ...


12

Purely from a due diligence point of view, you should always point out these issues. Presumably you are working together for an end client who has requested your combined services (either directly or indirectly) and wants a usable website which has been designed consistently. Nobody wants to use a website that provides an inconsistent experience and it ...


10

What do you need help with? Asking us should you quit your job? We cannot answer that. A few advises. If you plan to quit your job and do freelance, take this into consideration: Do you have enough money to pay bills for 1 year? Yes, 1 year. Write down all your clients and count how many hours of work they all can bring in 1 month. Be realistic and ...


8

I think you need to define out what a "free change" really means. Less than 15 minutes within 30-60 days of project end date? Sure, especially if its a quick and easy change. I don't see an issue with that. More than that, 1 hour minimum at an hourly rate. This will encourage them to either stop abusing the "free change" or start gathering up a minimum ...


8

This really depends on the percentage and workload. Getting paid in percentage is overall more risky then paid by hour - if you want more profit, you must assume greater risk. A bigger company will give you the option for percentage either to reduce their risk and their variable costs or most likely as the percentage model (%-model) would just cost less. ...


7

I've been a designer for over 25 years, there has never been any reason for me to ever work for free at the request of someone I didn't know. Ever. Yes I've worked for free for family or friends, but never random clients. Would your plumber install a new sink as a "test" to see if you like their work? Would an electrician wire a new outlet for you as a "...


6

Don't assume that there is no contract. Your emails and verbal communications may be construed as one; It appears, based on your question, that you didn't define 'project completion.' If it was agreed that 'Acceptance of final design by the client and delivery of vector images to the client' constitutes 'project completion,' then, technically, you don't ...


6

Something like this would have to be defined in your contract with the client, including with what constitutes a minor change (as opposed to a major change). You may also want to base it off of the original deliverable; after X minor changes or after at least Y% of the code base changes, there would have to be a charge for further changes.


6

You quote the hiring company exactly like a customer, be it fixed price or hourly fee, and you bill them. It may be the case that the hiring company takes a commission, don't be worried (but don't lower your prices for this reason). You absolutely establish a contract with this firm. You can make it longer term than for the initial project if you want, but ...


6

Directed Choices. Most clients I experience want to feel as though they have input into how things look. I think that's just human nature. The key for me has been to always provide directed choices rather than open-ended questions. What this means in rather than: "What color do you want it?" or "How do you think it should look?" You ask something ...


5

There is no design that is better for SEO - there are rules for content, the only way a single page app could rank higher than a multi-page app is by the content you are showing off. Basically, one of the most basic rules would be to have more than 15% relevant text content on a page. In most multi-page apps this is not possible and because of that, a single-...


5

Setting boundaries early is essential as most clients quickly get used to you doing things for free and then they don't appreciate the free hours you put in. Establish agreed terms and conditions in advance that include a project sign-off date and warranty period. My clients have two weeks to test and report bugs and I will happily fix these for free. ...


5

It's your business and your rules. We all would like to have our name imprinted into all projects we did, but that is impossible. If I only recall all the large projects I did and my name is not seen there. The only proof I have is their employee who hired me and whom I put as a reference. If he ever decides not to support me any more, I have no proof I did ...


5

I do custom software but I am not a web developer. However, I recently hired a company to develop a website. MY CONSUMER PERSPECTIVE: The company I settled on did the contract before the design. NO ONE offered a design in advance of a contract. In their contract they said "We will submit up to X designs for you to choose from for the home page plus X ...


5

Here's my opinion and practice.... I never respond or contact clients during any time I want to myself, ever. That is to say.. I don't respond to or contact clients before 9am, after 5pm, on weekends or on holidays - even if I happen to be working. If I get an email from a client at 6pm Friday night.. I do not respond until 9 am Monday at the earliest. I ...


4

I offer actual bug fixes for 30 days after launch, but everything else is billable (either my hourly rate in half-hour increments or a minimum five-hour-per-month retainer for clients with whom I have an ongoing relationship). My contract is also explicit about what, if any, responsibilities I have post-launch. During our final project meeting (post-launch), ...


4

This is always a business decision. As a general rule I fix bugs and the like free of charge. I offer a one year warranty on bugs and so forth. I will also throw in small changes free of charge (without promising customers this upfront) when it seems like a good idea given the general relationship with the customer. Maybe the customer badly misunderstood ...


4

I do this all the time. I made the mistake of providing hosting/domain services for a couple clients a few years ago. It was a nightmare and I won't do it again. While a perfectly valid revenue stream, I do not want to be "IT Support" for my clients. That means I don't resell/offer hosting. I don't maintain various CMS packages for clients, etc. It's just ...


4

Don't bother thinking how, whom or when a product will be updated if you plan selling stand-alone services. Your only responsibility is to inform your clients about what they really get by choosing you (your services) against other options. Using, selling or offering CMS as part of your product is not a requirement but merely an option. What else is ...


4

Sarah, this one's tricky. What comes to mind for me instantly is the plight of recording artists that get signed to a label. The label, by legal statute, has to pay the artists a minimum amount for each year they're signed. But while the contracts will demand that the artists produce a certain number of titles, the same contract does not guarantee that ...


4

I think you're shooting yourself in the foot with your current approach. Imagine a house painter offering services. The client doesn't know what he wants, but calls up the painter. The painter paints the house red on Monday. The client doesn't like it. The painter paints the house green on Tuesday. The client still doesn't like it. The painter shows ...


4

Firstly, you will need to talk to the client a lot. Whatever you feel you should ask, then ask. NEVER presume that he wants something. Ask, ask and ask. If you realize that you are boring to the client, there are 90% chances that this is the bad client and you will get into trouble eventually working with such clients. Good clients who want to make success ...


4

The best school is the real work life, you will never stop to learn in this field and you will never really start to learn seriously until you will start to work on client's projects. It's good that you have solid basis but my suggestion is to start to work on projects and problem solving (in your career you will be asked of things that you could never have ...


4

You are off to a good start with those skills. It can be challenging at first. Get good at research by using Google to find answers to questions. Use Stack Overflow and ask questions if necessary. You should also learn some back-end scripting languages, like PHP, Python, Ruby, Node.js, etc... Even if you just get the basics down, it will make you far ...


4

i was desperate for money and knew the people pretty good so i did not push a contract on them and instead started working ASAP That is your big mistake, business is business, even with friends it's still business. A freelancer without contract is very vulnerable. In all my contract I make sure I put a clause where I details that there is no refund ...


3

You're thinking about it backwards. Top freelancers can build a crappy site, and still rank. It's about reputation. Contribute to opensource projects, start a blog, get known. This will attract links (reputation) and you'll start to see an improvement. No amount of on-site SEO will matter at this point.


3

As a designer myself, my experience would tell me to work with you to find an logo you do want to use. I'd have a difficult time working on a logo and not satisfying the client in the end. If you haven't expressed clearly what you do not like and why you feel the current revision is unsuitable you should do so in a polite and respectful manner. Simply ...


3

Front end development, and web development, is a very general thing. Ideally you will find the part you like most and you rock most. We cannot tell you where you are best at, that is what you have to figure out by working on web projects. At the beginning, as more things you can do, the more work you will get. I would go for hot things such as adaptive ...


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