Hot answers tagged

10

What do you need help with? Asking us should you quit your job? We cannot answer that. A few advises. If you plan to quit your job and do freelance, take this into consideration: Do you have enough money to pay bills for 1 year? Yes, 1 year. Write down all your clients and count how many hours of work they all can bring in 1 month. Be realistic and ...


8

This really depends on the percentage and workload. Getting paid in percentage is overall more risky then paid by hour - if you want more profit, you must assume greater risk. A bigger company will give you the option for percentage either to reduce their risk and their variable costs or most likely as the percentage model (%-model) would just cost less. ...


7

I've been a designer for over 25 years, there has never been any reason for me to ever work for free at the request of someone I didn't know. Ever. Yes I've worked for free for family or friends, but never random clients. Would your plumber install a new sink as a "test" to see if you like their work? Would an electrician wire a new outlet for you as a "...


6

Don't assume that there is no contract. Your emails and verbal communications may be construed as one; It appears, based on your question, that you didn't define 'project completion.' If it was agreed that 'Acceptance of final design by the client and delivery of vector images to the client' constitutes 'project completion,' then, technically, you don't ...


6

You quote the hiring company exactly like a customer, be it fixed price or hourly fee, and you bill them. It may be the case that the hiring company takes a commission, don't be worried (but don't lower your prices for this reason). You absolutely establish a contract with this firm. You can make it longer term than for the initial project if you want, but ...


6

Directed Choices. Most clients I experience want to feel as though they have input into how things look. I think that's just human nature. The key for me has been to always provide directed choices rather than open-ended questions. What this means in rather than: "What color do you want it?" or "How do you think it should look?" You ask something ...


6

Here's my opinion and practice.... I never respond or contact clients during any time I want to myself, ever. That is to say.. I don't respond to or contact clients before 9am, after 5pm, on weekends or on holidays - even if I happen to be working. If I get an email from a client at 6pm Friday night.. I do not respond until 9 am Monday at the earliest. I ...


5

I do custom software but I am not a web developer. However, I recently hired a company to develop a website. MY CONSUMER PERSPECTIVE: The company I settled on did the contract before the design. NO ONE offered a design in advance of a contract. In their contract they said "We will submit up to X designs for you to choose from for the home page plus X ...


5

There is no design that is better for SEO - there are rules for content, the only way a single page app could rank higher than a multi-page app is by the content you are showing off. Basically, one of the most basic rules would be to have more than 15% relevant text content on a page. In most multi-page apps this is not possible and because of that, a single-...


5

It's your business and your rules. We all would like to have our name imprinted into all projects we did, but that is impossible. If I only recall all the large projects I did and my name is not seen there. The only proof I have is their employee who hired me and whom I put as a reference. If he ever decides not to support me any more, I have no proof I did ...


5

No money, no final design. Full stop. You can meet with them to discuss what they're looking for, or refer them to your portfolio. You NEVER release a final product until you get paid or money is in escrow.


5

Me personally, I don't pick up a pencil, mouse, turn on a computer, put on my glasses, etc..... nothing unless a fee has been determined for the work I'll be doing. In some cases, a deposit may be required before I start work. Imagine... you put in 10+ hours of work and then the client says something like, "Well, we thought $15/hr was a good price."...


4

I do this all the time. I made the mistake of providing hosting/domain services for a couple clients a few years ago. It was a nightmare and I won't do it again. While a perfectly valid revenue stream, I do not want to be "IT Support" for my clients. That means I don't resell/offer hosting. I don't maintain various CMS packages for clients, etc. It's just ...


4

Don't bother thinking how, whom or when a product will be updated if you plan selling stand-alone services. Your only responsibility is to inform your clients about what they really get by choosing you (your services) against other options. Using, selling or offering CMS as part of your product is not a requirement but merely an option. What else is ...


4

I offer actual bug fixes for 30 days after launch, but everything else is billable (either my hourly rate in half-hour increments or a minimum five-hour-per-month retainer for clients with whom I have an ongoing relationship). My contract is also explicit about what, if any, responsibilities I have post-launch. During our final project meeting (post-launch), ...


4

Setting boundaries early is essential as most clients quickly get used to you doing things for free and then they don't appreciate the free hours you put in. Establish agreed terms and conditions in advance that include a project sign-off date and warranty period. My clients have two weeks to test and report bugs and I will happily fix these for free. ...


4

Sarah, this one's tricky. What comes to mind for me instantly is the plight of recording artists that get signed to a label. The label, by legal statute, has to pay the artists a minimum amount for each year they're signed. But while the contracts will demand that the artists produce a certain number of titles, the same contract does not guarantee that ...


4

I think you're shooting yourself in the foot with your current approach. Imagine a house painter offering services. The client doesn't know what he wants, but calls up the painter. The painter paints the house red on Monday. The client doesn't like it. The painter paints the house green on Tuesday. The client still doesn't like it. The painter shows ...


4

Firstly, you will need to talk to the client a lot. Whatever you feel you should ask, then ask. NEVER presume that he wants something. Ask, ask and ask. If you realize that you are boring to the client, there are 90% chances that this is the bad client and you will get into trouble eventually working with such clients. Good clients who want to make success ...


4

The best school is the real work life, you will never stop to learn in this field and you will never really start to learn seriously until you will start to work on client's projects. It's good that you have solid basis but my suggestion is to start to work on projects and problem solving (in your career you will be asked of things that you could never have ...


4

You are off to a good start with those skills. It can be challenging at first. Get good at research by using Google to find answers to questions. Use Stack Overflow and ask questions if necessary. You should also learn some back-end scripting languages, like PHP, Python, Ruby, Node.js, etc... Even if you just get the basics down, it will make you far ...


4

i was desperate for money and knew the people pretty good so i did not push a contract on them and instead started working ASAP That is your big mistake, business is business, even with friends it's still business. A freelancer without contract is very vulnerable. In all my contract I make sure I put a clause where I details that there is no refund ...


4

Don't charge the client at all for the time you spend learning how to produce their deliverables. Do charge the client your regular hourly rate for the time you spend working to produce their deliverables. You offered to learn how to do this. In that case the burden is on you to spend your time, not the clients time, on how to produce the end result. If a ...


3

I see two potential problems: 1: Your sales process and articulation of the value proposition. 2: Possibly your annotation and markup of the wireframes Firstly you are separating wireframing and design, but they are both types of design. Secondly, if a client can't understand a wireframe then you haven't explained it well enough. We understand wireframes ...


3

I'm not 100% certain this is related to "freelance" as much as it is to workflow. But... I find wire framing critical. But it needs to often be explained to the client. At the very least the level of importance needs to be explained to clients. This is the skeleton or backbone of your site. It shows relative size and positioning for the general areas of ...


3

You're thinking about it backwards. Top freelancers can build a crappy site, and still rank. It's about reputation. Contribute to opensource projects, start a blog, get known. This will attract links (reputation) and you'll start to see an improvement. No amount of on-site SEO will matter at this point.


3

Sometimes, you need to learn to say no, and sometimes, you need to trust people. Unfortunately, I've been burned a few times by people "promising" money coming in, but never got around to it. It's happened 3 times, with different clients. I now ask for at least a DEPOSIT up front. Let's assume they can secure the investment after your meeting. How long do ...


3

Step 1 - Get written confirmation of their intention to pay you for your work! This can be done via email, or just by a letter, and asking for them to sign and return it to you to get your artwork. You haven't given them the work, so it's still all yours. With this written confirmation, make sure it acknowledges that you have done work, and you expect $ ...


3

As a designer myself, my experience would tell me to work with you to find an logo you do want to use. I'd have a difficult time working on a logo and not satisfying the client in the end. If you haven't expressed clearly what you do not like and why you feel the current revision is unsuitable you should do so in a polite and respectful manner. Simply ...


3

Front end development, and web development, is a very general thing. Ideally you will find the part you like most and you rock most. We cannot tell you where you are best at, that is what you have to figure out by working on web projects. At the beginning, as more things you can do, the more work you will get. I would go for hot things such as adaptive ...


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