60

Is this a script from a soap opera? There's far too much discussion taking place. Business is business and not friendship. Ignore anything not directly related to the business. All the back and forth trying to get the other to "understand" your position is, frankly silly. All you should be stating.. "We have a contract. Pay me." When he/she replies.. ...


40

Don't do it. If there were actually a prospect of the site making any real money (thus commissions being worthwhile) the guy wouldn't be offering to pay you in commissions. He's offering this payment structure because he knows the return on commissions will be far less than any standard fees you may want. In general, those offering this type of structure ...


26

You are not charging enough: listen to your friends! You should have looked around for jobs similar to what you do and found out how much others were being paid. Don't feel that your work is worth much less because you are a newbie, because the client will take it when you release it to him and earn much, much more. The client is correct in saying you can'...


20

Your chain of emails is unprofessional, you fail yourself by dropping to your client's argumentative level. As well as this, instead of getting to the point you make jabs and petty points informally, that seem very emotionally attached trying to play the guilt card and shame him. This is no way to follow up proceedings of a broken contract. Instead of ...


18

Realize that if you are tied up, full time, for a year, you'll most likely lose all your other clients. So, if that's okay you need to make it worth your while. If you are financially in good shape as things are with several clients, then putting all your eggs in one basket, as it were, can be very risky. Due to the damage, yes damage, such a position ...


16

The easiest thing is to shut down all, but what if the client is sick or something. Chances are 90% that they don't want to pay you, but there are still 10% which you need to consider. This is all true if you expect more work from them and if you really like the project. Do you have a direct contact with the client? Do Skype call to his mobile and see what ...


15

You need to shut it down ASAP. Chances are that by now, your "client" has cloned all of your work, which is not hard to do at all, and put it up on a different domain. I put the word client in quotes because, without a written contract, you really don't have anything that would prove how the other party is a "client". You may never see a cent from this ...


15

Yes! Yes! Yes! I rolled my eyes when I read your question... sorry... but I did. The contract is there for both of you and if you read questions elsewhere on freelancing, you'll read several who cut corners and found themselves with headaches. Contracts set expectations. Your expectations: Do you expect to be paid? How much? When? For what? If your ...


15

I think the rule is 80/20. 80% of complaints from 20% of customers. It applies to so many things like 20% of your carpet will get 80% of the wear and tear etc. It is a great question and one I have come across myself so I smiled a bit when I saw your question. I have done it the good way and the bad way. The bad way. I wrote to the customer and told them ...


13

There are obvious benefits to the freelancer if payment is made up front: No chasing the money at the end Harder for a client to cancel the project if they've already paid There is also a big risk to the client: What happens if the freelancer dies or disappears before the end of the project? I have seen 2 reasons why clients are willing to take that risk:...


13

At the bottom of all my quotes I have this wording: We are here to provide an excellent customer experience. Because of this, we encourage input from the Client during the entire process. However, any major or significant changes requested during development, will carry along with them a renegotiated fee based on the new scope of the changes. We understand ...


12

Don't be scared of that guy, there is no way that he can sue you, I assume you are talking about oDesk or something similar. When you register on that website there are some privacy and agreements that you and your client have to read. Clearly he is not aware that you weren't working for him under a real contract, that's just a contract on the website. Also,...


12

Short answer Mail to the client and ask them what can be done to get things recovered. Mutually agree on scope and rate. Best if after all they change their feedback at oDesk, but even if they can't, it still worth trying. Improve the way how you communicate with the clients. The ultimate goal is to make them absolutely certain what are you currently doing, ...


12

With new clients that approach me, I ask for a non-refundable deposit up front. Usually it ranges from 30% to 50% depending on the overall project cost. I tend to waive the deposit for any client I've previously worked for and not experienced payment issues with. When asked, or if the client balks at this, I explain that the deposit is to cover the work ...


11

The first step is to be clear with your employer about your plans. If he gave you the green light, then read the following lines. If he did not give you green light (a reference for other readers of this topic), then you should visit a legal advisor to review your contracts. Employers are not always right and fair. Now, you're asking how to approach to ...


11

I have terminated a few contracts and I have always agonized about it. However, termination goes smoothly because the client usually hasn't gone through the mental anguish over the project that I have. They usually are pretty calm and professional about it, despite whatever shenanigans happened during the project. I always use the timeline as a reason for ...


10

The German platform GULP frequently publishes statistics in press releases and in its knowledge base. There also is a calculator to estimate hourly rates. From my experience, they mostly staff consulting jobs at large companies in the area of SAP, banking, and automotive. As of August 2013, GULP claims that consultants in the age group 40 to 50 get the ...


10

If you need to cut them as a client, you need to do it sooner rather then later. Doing it later lets the problem build and build, and you carry more emotional weight when you finally do it. If it was a small problem brewing from a while ago, I'd talk to them about it, and possibly try to salvage the relationship. It sounds like you tried (showing proof, ...


10

The client is right. You can't raise the cost of a project halfway through; that is unethical. That's probably why clients go away. That is not business at all. Try find some cost estimation sites and do calculate. Most of those sites have $50 - $75 per hour, and I personally charge $35 to $40 per hour. But for you, I think it is better to start with $20 ...


10

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


10

I'm a freelance web developer and security researcher, so my experience may be a little biased. In general, web development is a pretty insecure mess. More experienced developers are generally seen as more security-focused programmers; you first learn to program, then you learn to program well, then you learn to program securely. In general, if your client ...


9

Disclaimer: Always read contracts you sign multiple times. Regardless of whether or not a contract is enforceable, be sure you do not agree to anything you disagree with. Do you need your employer's permission to submit a pull request to contribute your change back into the project's public repo? Nope. this is a straight up "no", regardless. You are ...


9

You need to decide how complicated the site is going to be and how long it will take for you to get it up and running. Also, will there be any hosting/bandwidth costs, maintenance, etc.? If it's nothing complicated and you can live without the money then by all means go for it, but it's a risky way to earn a living. Get him to show you his trading volumes ...


9

For SLA agreements you should be able to make an estimate based on fixed tasks and average expected work for improvements/bugs. For fixed tasks: Server costs. If you're paying for this-- add it up and add this to the rest of the total. Don't just absorb it. Outline an update plan. For instance, Update all server software monthly. All device software ...


9

There are many variables. In short words, you have to know how to licence your work and this should happen when you write the contract with the client. Of course, there are many aspects of the problem you should consider: Does the work contain parts over which your client has full copyright (logo, text, colors, design, source code, trademarks)? What can you ...


9

Not pertaining to iOS specificall, but freelancing in general, also as a citizen/resident of the USA, I would charge roughly 4 times the hourly rate you get from an employer. I've seen other freelancers charge around this much. So if an iOS dev is making 25EUR/hour, then freelance, said dev would charge 100EUR/hour. This may seem high, but there are few ...


9

she still owes me for the work I've done How long has she owed you and how much? If she's past due on a payment, or owes you thousands, that could be enough reason to stop right there. But should I refund her any money because I'm quitting? Not unless you had a formal agreement to do work that you haven't already done, or she paid you for work you haven'...


9

Life's too short.. You have 2 choices.... Invoice for the work you've completed. Wait until that invoice is paid. Then tell him you're done. You'll package everything and prepare to deliver things in their current state and he will be free to find another developer to finish the project. Be quiet, sit back, and realize your only option is to deal with the ...


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