59

Is this a script from a soap opera? There's far too much discussion taking place. Business is business and not friendship. Ignore anything not directly related to the business. All the back and forth trying to get the other to "understand" your position is, frankly silly. All you should be stating.. "We have a contract. Pay me." When he/she replies.. ...


26

I simply state, "Sorry. Pricing is set and rates are non-negotiable." I haven't run into an instance where that offended anyone. I may not get the work but, if they won't pay my rates, I don't see that as a problem. You aren't required to explain anything to clients in terms of your business structure or calculations. Actually going into too much detail is ...


23

What you are dealing with is known as a "Sales Pipeline." (Step through the Slideshow) And you are getting the steps out of order. That's what's causing your frustration. As a tech person (like myself), it frustrates you because we're used to a "Here's my problem. Fix it for money." view of the world. The reason that we think this way is that we are ...


17

Your chain of emails is unprofessional, you fail yourself by dropping to your client's argumentative level. As well as this, instead of getting to the point you make jabs and petty points informally, that seem very emotionally attached trying to play the guilt card and shame him. This is no way to follow up proceedings of a broken contract. Instead of ...


15

TL;DR: In any case, I would suggest to stay positive. Try to turn the things like you are not raising a conflict of interests by asking something for yourself. Try to convince your client that you have the same goals, to make the job done at minimal cost and maximum quality. Also, resolving an existing problem prior doing anything else seems to be a good ...


15

Wasting a day hoping for work to arrive if you have other work lined up is on you. Don't start any work before you have a signed contract. If they sign a contract, the likelihood that they are serious is already much higher than before. Ask for early payment for the first piece of work. Once they start paying you, the likelihood that they are serious is ...


14

Yes, it is definitely unethical. You do have other options. You could: Do nothing. Just take the loss and treat it as a learning experience. Next time you will know to never give the client the finished website until they have paid in full. Always host the site on your own servers during development and only transfer the site to the client's servers ...


14

It's easy: Stop falling for the guilt trip and simply do as any professional would do in similar case. That is, say yes and show a price list at the same time. And stick to this. If the client sill comes back that XYZ should be included, you simply cut that short and say "let me know when you'll have the budget for the extra features and I'll be happy to ...


13

I just ignore the off-hours contact and deal with things during traditional hours - even if that means I get emails and messages the next morning. I have a few clients who will email Sunday evening. While they may be expecting a reply, they don't get it until Monday. Like with any business, a client is free to email or call anytime, that doesn't mean I've ...


12

Believe it or not, I often find if a client is overly prepared they might be difficult to deal with. I have to remind those clients that I do this for a living, and they are in a completely different industry which has nothing to do with building websites. This is pretty subjective but some other red flags I see often are: "I think this should take about X ...


12

it could be that he is just under time pressure and while the change in commitments is unfortunate, future opportunities may make up for it This is your statement from above. This tells me that you're more concerned about how your client's business is going than you are about your OWN business. How you run your business should NEVER be conditional to how ...


12

The easiest way to handle the short-notice work is to set up a Service Level Agreement (SLA). You can document how much notice the client must give, and how soon you will act, with financial requirements in each direction. Get this agreed, signed by management. Implement a basic ticket handling system and boom, you can bill extra for the urgent stuff. That ...


11

I have terminated a few contracts and I have always agonized about it. However, termination goes smoothly because the client usually hasn't gone through the mental anguish over the project that I have. They usually are pretty calm and professional about it, despite whatever shenanigans happened during the project. I always use the timeline as a reason for ...


11

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


11

I would never allow this under any circumstance. The guy can sleep in his car... or the bus/train station for all I care. Even if I charged and he's willing to pay, invading my home is way over the line for any freelance client. It sends a message, whether direct or indirect, that you'll allow the client to overstep the boundaries of a client/freelancer ...


11

Absolutely not! If you have agreed on terms, and delivered, then you should expect him to deliver on his part of the arrangement. Having said that... Did you give him status updates with the opportunity for feedback? Did he understand the limitations he put in place for you? Does he seem to want to continue to use you if you keep working for him? These ...


10

If you need to cut them as a client, you need to do it sooner rather then later. Doing it later lets the problem build and build, and you carry more emotional weight when you finally do it. If it was a small problem brewing from a while ago, I'd talk to them about it, and possibly try to salvage the relationship. It sounds like you tried (showing proof, ...


10

I'd just be "busy" myself and be unavailable. This kind of interaction is a harbinger to how quickly he'll pay and how important he'll see any requests on your part to complete any projects. One cancelation is understandable. Two cancellations might be okay depending upon his/her reasoning. Three cancellations shows a clear lack of commitment or intention....


9

she still owes me for the work I've done How long has she owed you and how much? If she's past due on a payment, or owes you thousands, that could be enough reason to stop right there. But should I refund her any money because I'm quitting? Not unless you had a formal agreement to do work that you haven't already done, or she paid you for work you haven'...


9

Life's too short.. You have 2 choices.... Invoice for the work you've completed. Wait until that invoice is paid. Then tell him you're done. You'll package everything and prepare to deliver things in their current state and he will be free to find another developer to finish the project. Be quiet, sit back, and realize your only option is to deal with the ...


9

Supply documentation for an additional fee. It's more work to track everything you do... you should be compensated for that work.


8

If I received the same call and the client started barking requests at me before I could even figure out to whom I was speaking, I think I'd become a bit defensive. I think it's always important, as a creative professional, that you're able to engage with the client at a certain pace. My "pace" includes: Who are you? What line of business are you in? What ...


8

Wait, if I understood: you were hired to make a website you did it and the client did not pay it you have access to admin service hosting the website If I understood it properly, than the content on his website is still your. Transfer of intellectual rights happens when one side is paid. So IMHO you should definitely take back your property (source codes)...


8

There is nothing wrong with explaining to a client that Skype (or phone calls) are not sufficient and you need to have written approval of something either via email, fax, or postal mail. I would wait until you have a clear, written, approval of terms.


8

So much to address here... First off, NO. You don't need a PR person on full-time to help you. You need to deal with your own situation before you bring more people in. Freelancing should make you more money than being a regular full-time employee, punching in and out everyday. What are your rates at? Obviously, too low. Read the other questions on here ...


7

This is sort of a familiar one. A client wants someone to build a website, and doesn't want to give them all the pieces of the puzzle at once (or is very vague about it). There are three choices here: Continue being trickled information, eventually going insane. Leave that client instantly, without hesitation. Tell your client, plain and simple, that ...


7

I would have to say that this is an opinion based question and there is no right or wrong answer. My answer is based on my desire to do the right thing for my clients. I would say yes, but to a point. Perhaps this is a bug that was in your application? Whether the project was fixed bid or hourly, it is your responsibility to deliver a working application. ...


7

I do not know what's standard for your particular business niché. However, your "cost of materials" seems exceptionally out of line to me. Charging for software, hardware, and training which you will use for every client you ever have seems ludicrous to me. Detailing that in a quote/bid for me, would instantly mean I wanted to anger my clients. Operating ...


7

For large projects I always do monthly billings to the client plus a prepayment before starting the project to pay initial costs. It is perfectly OK to do like that, it is a mutual responsibility. If you ask a single payment only at the end you will give a "weapon" that will make the client blackmail you if you don't do all his changes and requests, just ...


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