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19 votes
Accepted

The client is asking for too much work for the money

May I guess. He approached to you saying if you do this for bargain, you will get more work? Yes you will get more work, 5 times more complex for 50% more money - $150 in your case. Any serious client ...
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  • 14.2k
16 votes

The client is asking for too much work for the money

I'll keep my answer simple. If a client is asking for a custom full-fledged CMS/e-commerce site for a $100, as a freelancer, you should read that as "this person is a complete waste of my time," and ...
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  • 1,018
15 votes

Client's budget is higher than expected

There are those who believe that it is ethical to sell at what ever the client is willing to pay. Others see no such need and will look to give the client a good deal. You can give a good deal to the ...
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  • 1,067
11 votes

The client is asking for too much work for the money

This client may have never intended for you to do the work shown in the initial links sent. Perhaps the client is hoping that you will take the bait and actually commit to doing much harder work ...
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  • 5,304
6 votes
Accepted

Should I charge money for troubleshooting?

It depends on the kind of troubleshooting and the time that you spend on the same. If the troubleshooting takes a long time, yes I would charge on hourly basis. After all we spend time in solving the ...
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5 votes

Should I charge money for troubleshooting?

I'm a software consultant for a software company, which basically means I spend a lot of time setting up, installing, configuring and troubleshooting software on client environments. I bill a lot of ...
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  • 151
5 votes

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

You'd be better off trying to pick up some work through recruiters than ridiculously lowering your rate. The longer you stay in projects where the client doesn't value your work, the more annoyed you'...
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  • 5,304
4 votes
Accepted

What does it mean when a client stops communicating after receiving a proposal?

In my experience, even seemingly eager clients can spend weeks deciding on whether to move ahead on a project. A client not replying could mean several things: 1) Your offer was financially way out ...
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  • 3,672
4 votes
Accepted

Project which has potential and is important to me but going to fail because of budget

As you mentioned, you could do the work and bill with payment sometime in the future (based on the company having revenue). This leaves you taking on the risk of not getting paid, if you go this ...
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4 votes

The client is asking for too much work for the money

As I write this I note that the topic is over a year old, so this may be a useless answer. However, one thing to consider is that the client does not realize what they are requesting. They are asking ...
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4 votes

What if I feel client is over-charged

What you are experiencing is the difference between value-to-the-client billing, and cost-of-supplier-inputs billing. Do not refund. There is a set scope of work, and an agreed set fee.
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  • 258
3 votes

What if I feel client is over-charged

Pricing is subjective. And of course, overpricing is also subjective. In my opinion, there is not a problem if the client knows exactly what's being paid for. The problem begins when you start ...
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3 votes

How to ask for increase the budget for a freelancing project

"This isn't what was agreed upon. I'll need to re-scope the project and provide a new cost estimate." Be forthright, upfront, and honest about it. The client is certainly aware they've made ...
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  • 17.3k
3 votes

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

There's really no solid information to go on here. Not sure what "ridiculously low" means... 80% your normal rate? 50%? 25? No clue long have you been in the field? If you are pricing to match ...
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  • 17.3k
3 votes

Client's budget is higher than expected

It is important that you can justify any prices you give; if the client gets the impression that you are making up numbers on-the-fly (e.g. simply increasing your price to be nearer their budget) then ...
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  • 41
2 votes

Client's budget is higher than expected

As the other answers indicate, there are several aspects to setting a price. If it is a one-time-sale, one should probably attempt to maximize the payment. This could either be done by setting a price ...
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  • 3,672
2 votes
Accepted

Client suggesting to cap off a project

The approach is simple: until you get paid, work stops. Period. Let them know you'll start doing work once their payment clears, as they have used their one free late payment (or something similar). ...
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  • 6,793
2 votes

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

The temptation is always to lower rates when work isn't coming in. My rule of thumb is to only lower rates if you can get the job by lowering 5% or 10% max. Otherwise, it's just the wrong kind of ...
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  • 601
1 vote

What does it mean when a client stops communicating after receiving a proposal?

There is no law against being slightly rude or impolite, just social custom. And especially in sales cycles it can happen a lot that people don't reply for a multitude of reasons. My own rule for ...
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  • 1,619
1 vote

Cost estimation for an e-commerce Web and App development

Prices for development as you describe vary considerably form country to country, even within countries, and sometimes even within counties within countries. They vary from developer to developer, ...
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  • 1,730
1 vote

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

I think you are looking at the wrong choices - you are debating whether to take work at a low rate or no work at all. There is a third option - to learn skills as to how to market your services to a ...
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  • 111
1 vote

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

Are you selling a Rolls Royce to someone that only wants a van? The question you have to tackle, and you have to get used to asking or at least working out, is "What is your budget for this?". Then ...
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  • 1,730
1 vote

How do I balance the risk of pricing myself out of a job vs. not getting any work at all?

In my opinion (and experience having done exactly this a few times) it depends on whether this is project-based work or an ongoing commitment. There's nothing wrong with giving somebody a one-time "...
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1 vote

What if I feel client is over-charged

Once you and client agreed then you should not change charges. Because think that now if you change price then what client will think. Sometime there will be positive impact and sometime it can put ...
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