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19

May I guess. He approached to you saying if you do this for bargain, you will get more work? Yes you will get more work, 5 times more complex for 50% more money - $150 in your case. Any serious client will let you first do 1 project, and only then he will talk about more work. Because if they immediately say that they have more work, even a bad contractor ...


16

I'll keep my answer simple. If a client is asking for a custom full-fledged CMS/e-commerce site for a $100, as a freelancer, you should read that as "this person is a complete waste of my time," and move on. Of course, don't say that to the client. To the client, be very professional and polite. Thank them for considering you, apologize for not being ...


11

This client may have never intended for you to do the work shown in the initial links sent. Perhaps the client is hoping that you will take the bait and actually commit to doing much harder work without changing your price. I'd inform the client that because of a change in scope, you have to change your price. Don't worry about what happens in the future, ...


6

It depends on the kind of troubleshooting and the time that you spend on the same. If the troubleshooting takes a long time, yes I would charge on hourly basis. After all we spend time in solving the problem. If it takes less time and its just a minor fix then there is no need to charge. But if the troubleshooting is often (more than twice), then consider ...


5

You'd be better off trying to pick up some work through recruiters than ridiculously lowering your rate. The longer you stay in projects where the client doesn't value your work, the more annoyed you'll become because the client will continue to be unreasonable. Usually, this type of client is clueless and will work on the premise that you deliver ...


5

I'm a software consultant for a software company, which basically means I spend a lot of time setting up, installing, configuring and troubleshooting software on client environments. I bill a lot of time for troubleshooting problems in their environments, at the same rate as we charge for development. The decision to bill or not is usually dependent on the ...


4

As you mentioned, you could do the work and bill with payment sometime in the future (based on the company having revenue). This leaves you taking on the risk of not getting paid, if you go this route I would increase your fee to account for the added risk. Another option is you could setup a revenue sharing agreement, whereby you would receive a portion ...


4

What you are experiencing is the difference between value-to-the-client billing, and cost-of-supplier-inputs billing. Do not refund. There is a set scope of work, and an agreed set fee.


4

In my experience, even seemingly eager clients can spend weeks deciding on whether to move ahead on a project. A client not replying could mean several things: 1) Your offer was financially way out of their league and they are either offended or embarrassed by it. 2) Your offer is within their means, but the internal processes at the client take time 3) ...


3

There's really no solid information to go on here. Not sure what "ridiculously low" means... 80% your normal rate? 50%? 25? No clue long have you been in the field? If you are pricing to match those with 10 years experience in your field and you have 2 years experience... then you may need to evaluate that. Being "not as expensive as an agency or other ...


3

Pricing is subjective. And of course, overpricing is also subjective. In my opinion, there is not a problem if the client knows exactly what's being paid for. The problem begins when you start overpricing your product after the agreement with the client. We live in a free market environment and we are judged every day, as both sellers and buyers.


3

As I write this I note that the topic is over a year old, so this may be a useless answer. However, one thing to consider is that the client does not realize what they are requesting. They are asking for work that they may not be able to do themselves, because it's outside their area of knowledge, much less expertise. You might consider discussing, ...


2

The approach is simple: until you get paid, work stops. Period. Let them know you'll start doing work once their payment clears, as they have used their one free late payment (or something similar). Keep it professional, but be ready to walk away and look for other work. If they are flip-flopping this much this late into a project, it seems to me like they ...


2

"This isn't what was agreed upon. I'll need to re-scope the project and provide a new cost estimate." Be forthright, upfront, and honest about it. The client is certainly aware they've made additional changes. As for getting compensation via an equity stake, that's an entirely different negotiation.


2

For the budget conscience scope creeper type client, it's always important to ensure you clear up what they want and what is the minimum viable product that they seek. Always set expectations up front You approach is valid and IMHO the best approach. Set expectations in email or written communication and document the exchange if all possible: email ...


2

The temptation is always to lower rates when work isn't coming in. My rule of thumb is to only lower rates if you can get the job by lowering 5% or 10% max. Otherwise, it's just the wrong kind of customer and they will never pay you the rate you're really after. It's interesting that clients love you and are scared off by the final quote. What's worked for ...


1

There is no law against being slightly rude or impolite, just social custom. And especially in sales cycles it can happen a lot that people don't reply for a multitude of reasons. My own rule for this sort of thing: If you are the one who wants something, you need to go after it. If they want something, they must go after it. In this case, you want the ...


1

Prices for development as you describe vary considerably form country to country, even within countries, and sometimes even within counties within countries. They vary from developer to developer, agency to agency, and it is impossible to give you a meaningful quote. Also, any quote provided, in three years time, will not be a valueable answer for any other ...


1

I think you are looking at the wrong choices - you are debating whether to take work at a low rate or no work at all. There is a third option - to learn skills as to how to market your services to a different market. There are always clients looking for the cheapest option - who are indifferent or ignorant of different product quality. But there are also ...


1

Are you selling a Rolls Royce to someone that only wants a van? The question you have to tackle, and you have to get used to asking or at least working out, is "What is your budget for this?". Then you tell them what you can do to achieve their goals within their working budget. Or you give them two options, one slightly under their budget so they can save ...


1

In my opinion (and experience having done exactly this a few times) it depends on whether this is project-based work or an ongoing commitment. There's nothing wrong with giving somebody a one-time "discount" especially if you're not particularly busy (nobody needs to know what you charge other clients*). The big question is do you think it's worth your ...


1

Once you and client agreed then you should not change charges. Because think that now if you change price then what client will think. Sometime there will be positive impact and sometime it can put negative impact on client mind. So for now do work on agreed changes , from next time you should take care while decide project task charge.


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