14

Generate an invoice marked "past due". Send certified. That's all you can really do in your case, at this step, without getting an attorney involved. The $10,000 is probably more than any state's small claims process. Other than that, don't lift a FINGER until you've been paid in full. You might hear your client trying to bargain with you, but you've ...


11

It's not about advantages, it is about law and also about your clients. In some countries, it is illegal to work without invoicing (France for instance). If you work as a contractor for a company, it is likely that the company will need an invoice for its accounting. Otherwise it will not be possible to justify the expense to the tax authority, and then it ...


11

No. Client pays an invoice. It's up to you to calculate all costs in the invoice or pay part of them yourself. For example, I always pay PayPal's 4%, never ask the client to pay it nor I increase my price for 4%. I treat it as my running costs. Read point 1 :)


9

I tell customers who ask for detailed itemization of time usage that "this is not a service I provide". If pressed, I note that tracking that level of detail for him would create administrative overhead for you, and that you would either have to tack that time on to his bill, or adjust your rates to compensate. Since your goal is to provide value to your ...


9

For SLA agreements you should be able to make an estimate based on fixed tasks and average expected work for improvements/bugs. For fixed tasks: Server costs. If you're paying for this-- add it up and add this to the rest of the total. Don't just absorb it. Outline an update plan. For instance, Update all server software monthly. All device software ...


9

Unless you receive payment, I don't believe you are obligated to do anything. It's your fault to some degree for letting outstanding invoices "build up over time". You should never allow that to happen for any client. If they haven't paid you they don't own anything. I would not even entertain transfer of anything until payment has been made in full. And ...


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


8

Some of the first considerations would be: How many times have you done similar work, what were your costs, time, difficulties. How much will you have to charge just to break even? What profit is necessary to pay yourself and subcontractors, buy new equipment or purchase training to keep yourself current, offset expected cost increases or lean times where ...


7

I don't think those are small reasons, especially the first one. Here's how I would explain it: "I have to set aside time in my schedule to be available if you have questions or problems. That time costs money. If I don't set aside that time and you have an issue, suddenly all my other work has to be dropped by the way-side which is not fair to those other ...


7

Well this is really opinion-based. But there are some aspects to be aware of. Some clients will see your failure to invoice as an "ok" to send you more changes then act shocked when you want to be paid. For this reason you need to be a bit careful with free services. Clients like this just try and roll over you and then start becoming very difficult when ...


7

No. If you invoice for $380, you should receive $380... then if your payment processor has fees, they are deducted from the $380. In no instance is it "okay" for a client to send less than the invoiced amount, for whatever reason. If the client must pay fees, then those fees are their problem they should be paid above and beyond any invoice amount. ...


6

In my experience this is a huge flag. For one reason or another trust has broken down with the client, which is indicative by them asking for an itemized report. One way to salvage the relationship is to simply ask them what is the motivation behind the request for an itemized report? Ask them if they feel like they're getting less than what they paid for? ...


6

Generally, clients buy a freelancer's time. Using that logic, all time spent on client work is invoiced, regardless of the work. I never heard of clients wanting different rates for work on prototype versus the actual product - and since both will consume 100% of the freelancers time, it seems reasonable that they cost the same. A reasonable angle could be ...


5

This sounds very close to a retainer style agreement, but with payments in arrears. I don't like this. If you and the client know that it will cost $xxx of money every month, it should be due by the 1st of each month, in advance. That would make it a proper retainer. You need an agreement in place (contract, Scope of Work, etc) to protect you, and the ...


5

I don't think it's necessary. I have invoiced without an address before. I just emailed the person and put their email address and phone number in the area where I normally put an address. But that was just a $25 invoice... I think the real benefit of having an address is it will make it much easier to go after someone in court if they don't pay you. ...


5

The single worst mistake I ever made as a contractor was agreeing to provide source code before payment was made. Don't do it. This doesn't pass the "smell test" at all.


5

the invoice date: last day of the previous month when work was completed (March 31) send invoice the same/next day (March 31 OR April 1st) doesn't make a difference yes: invoice is always generated after work is completed unless otherwise agreed upon. (in case of multi month project OR pre-payment arrangement) hope this helps.


5

If I have a client which needs to run something requiring a license, they purchase a license (through me) so they can continue to use the licensed product. If I purchase a license, it's so I [my company] can legally use the product. So I would be free to show mockups or other things using the product. Then if a client chooses a mockup containing a licensed ...


4

I assume the request for a registration number is for VAT purposes. In many EU countries including the one I mainly work in an invoice needs to include the VAT registration number of the supplier as well as the client. Also, for business within the EU (above a certain amount) you need to fill in an EU sales list which includes all your EU suppliers and ...


4

Here's a different approach. Instead of 8k a year, offer the client your available time in smaller chunks: 8k / year 750 / mo 200 / seven business days 75 / per EACH incident (with some limitation!!!) The client will have to get wise real quick. Backups and maintenance is nothing trivial, and maybe you set a separate price for just that alone.


4

"I understand that generally after invoicing for a freelancing gig, it may take at least 30 days to receive payment" -- this is incorrect. You have the power to set forth your own payment terms. But you have to do this BEFORE STARTING WORK!!! Don't make the mistake of getting through even a day's work without covering this incredibly important element. ...


4

Reissuing an invoice should be fine as long as it is clear why the invoice has been reissued. This could be done by annotating the new invoice appropriately such as, "Invoice [number] reissued with amended address" or similar. For obvious reasons it is especially important to be clear about whether the invoice amount has changed or not and whether it needs ...


4

No. Never add processing fees to accept payments. Just don't. This is really in similar to Peter's answer I realize. However... An important factor is that some merchant accounts severely frown upon raising rates to cover their processing charges. In fact, some outright hate it. It devalues their name in the eyes of your clients. Think about that.... You add ...


4

Tax returns. Neither Fiverr nor istockphoto are your employers so they aren't obligated to track your earnings or send you records. It's up to you to maintain income records. Since these sites are not your employers no bank should need anything from them. The bank is treating you like a "employee" of these sites, which you are not. You are self-employed ...


4

Simple down to earth advice: unless you have a contract or document that explicitly includes the requirement to supply the source code before payment, I think you are right not to change the existing arrangement. I would not go behind person B's back though, that might escalate. I'd communicate with person B and explain the situation and the way of working ...


4

First, from looking at your first question and reading this one, I assume you've already pandered to the clients apologies and promises of payment too much. As well as this, I'll be assuming you're set on taking court action, and will therefore address the process required before action; rather than assess whether the option is viable or worth your time, ...


4

I am NOT a lawyer. It is my understanding that in the United States, if you have evidence of an intent to default on payment or a contract, you can start the legal processes of repercussions due to that default, i.e. small claims. Certainly someone stating, in writing "I won't pay" is evidence that there is direct intent to breach any contract for ...


4

There is more than one way to bill clients for creating websites. Many freelancers view it as a product, and thus charge a flat rate for what they believe the full value of their time + expertise is worth. Hourly billing for creating a new website is probably less common. I work both ways, but prefer to work under a flat rate for new websites so that both ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible