Hot answers tagged

6

Refund consulting (e.g. telling people that you can help them to locate lost or unclaimed money or property, in return for a fee or a percentage of the money claimed) is, as far as I'm aware, perfectly legal in both the US and Europe. There are multiple organisations doing it in the US; https://unclaimed.org/ And in the UK; https://unclaimedassets.co.uk/, ...


3

I used to do the same thing (Part-time employed in country A, as well as self-employed invoicing other clients in country B in a different currency), so I'll tell you what I did. Create a self-employed company in country A Create a bank account in country A - with currency of country B, and link that account to your self-employed company Ask your Revenue ...


3

I'm not sure if it's the same for every EU country, but in Belgium: Yes, you have to include a clause on your invoice that explains why you are not charging VAT. It used to be that you had to point to the exact article in the (Belgian) VAT law. Similar to your second example. In Belgium, at least, this has been simplified last year and you can just put a ...


3

I've contacted a TN accounting firm, here's what they said: "You can put 0% tax rate on your invoice if you like, but the main thing is that the invoice should clearly show that it is an out-of-state customer (with an address from another state or country). TN considers web design and development as the creation of software on the customer’s server. So if ...


2

From EU perspective it works like this: If you buy goods for the purposes of your business from a supplier based outside the EU, you must generally pay VAT at the point of import (and may deduct this in your next VAT return if you make taxed sales). http://europa.eu/youreurope/business/vat-customs/cross-border/index_en.htm I don't know anything about ...


2

The closest thing I know is a friend of mine who is from Southern Europe who founded a company in Chile or Peru I think. After 1 or 2 years of good business, he got their citizenship. He also told me that he's very satisfied with their tax policy, they returned him a lot of money in the end of a year. Maybe you try to investigate a solution to establish a ...


2

First of all, the ultimate source to consult is the US embassy (or its nearest consulate) in your country - mostly its web page, since embassies rarely engage in lengthy and abstract discussions over a phone and email. Physical presence in the US is the key issue here. If you are working remotely and the presence is required only for occasional meetings or ...


1

You should have a EU-VAT number. This number should be on any invoice. Your clients can check its validity Here: http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/vies/ IF you do not have such a number, get one from you financial authorities.


1

The way I understand it VAT number in EU serves as EU-wide tax id. There is a VAT number database where you can check the validity of counter party VAT number. In Czechia you are required by law to acquire VAT number no longer than a month after you issue your first invoice to an EU counter party. I suggest you check your regulations as you might be required ...


1

In Germany you would need to be at least a self-employee. Go to your local city hall and tell them you want to register a business. The procedure is pretty straight forward - It just takes a couple of minutes to register your business. After you registered your business you will also get a tax-id from the tax authorities. But: It would be better to talk to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible