7

No. If you invoice for $380, you should receive $380... then if your payment processor has fees, they are deducted from the $380. In no instance is it "okay" for a client to send less than the invoiced amount, for whatever reason. If the client must pay fees, then those fees are their problem they should be paid above and beyond any invoice amount. ...


6

Some of the first considerations would be: How many times have you done similar work, what were your costs, time, difficulties. How much will you have to charge just to break even? What profit is necessary to pay yourself and subcontractors, buy new equipment or purchase training to keep yourself current, offset expected cost increases or lean times where ...


6

Generally, clients buy a freelancer's time. Using that logic, all time spent on client work is invoiced, regardless of the work. I never heard of clients wanting different rates for work on prototype versus the actual product - and since both will consume 100% of the freelancers time, it seems reasonable that they cost the same. A reasonable angle could be ...


4

There is more than one way to bill clients for creating websites. Many freelancers view it as a product, and thus charge a flat rate for what they believe the full value of their time + expertise is worth. Hourly billing for creating a new website is probably less common. I work both ways, but prefer to work under a flat rate for new websites so that both ...


3

If you are not registered for VAT, you must not charge it. I take it from your post that your customer has mentioned VAT on a purchase order but has not yet paid you as you have not yet submitted an invoice. Your invoice will, in your normal manner, not include VAT. Your customer would be expected to pay the invoiced amount. Your invoices, of course, ...


3

Yes. Even if you invoice a private person (no company involved), then the invoiced person & their address who pays bill must be named on your invoice. There are two tax and one criminal reason. a) in your accounts you are showing a true record of source of payment to you. b) This keep your tax accounts in order. c) If "No person" & "no ...


2

For work with multiple clients, the best way to keep invoices distinct is through the use of a prefix code, so if I have three clients I might have three invoice 0001's, but with a different notation at the start e.g. CN1-00001 CN2-00001 CN3-00001 This system allows you to see, at a glance, which invoice you're referencing and, for your own ease of ...


2

There is always a constant tension between a developer and a client over pricing. You have to charge enough to cover your business expenses. But clients want the least expense and want assurances of price. When you have not done such before, you don't know what your costs are. However, in the field of website development, you can look at what other people in ...


2

I'm not sure what other advice would be useful than suggesting that you contact whoever issues their invoices (presumably a Finance Department) and explaining that; You're not sure what they've done (or why) Can they please undo it immediately and make a payment into your bank account like they should have done in the first place. You may need to refer ...


2

On the face of it, your problem is a simple one to solve. Depending on your method of invoicing, you either need to just send a corrected invoice with the new amount (if it was an informal or pro-forma invoice) or issue a credit note to the client (to the value of the old invoice) and raise a new invoice with the corrected amount and a new invoice number if ...


2

Clockify, Timecamp, and MS Access are all tools that support time tracking for developers. However, since many developers use Slack nowadays for communication, the Slack API and “slack-based work sessions” can be considered free tools for time tracking. Essentially you track in slack, “[30m work session] working on XYZ feature ”, and you can use the Slack ...


2

I used to use https://www.toptal.com/tracker/ It has a desktop app that hides in the tray for tracking hours, a web tracker and dashboard, mobile apps, all the things. It allows you to take screenshots on intervals (or not), generate invoices, and even grant access to your client to view the current hours tracked/logged. Pretty cool, 100% free and maintained ...


2

I've been using an MS Access app i put together to track hours, clients, create invoices from hours entered, payments, etc. Since last year i have it connected to MYSQL backend in cloud.


2

TL;DR. In this case they've simply assumed that you're VAT-rated, so the fault is entirely theirs. Issue them a credit note for the difference (or just refuse the PO until they send a corrected one) and explain that you're not registered for VAT. Keep copies of those emails for at least 5 years in case the VAT man comes a callin' As to whether to start ...


1

There are many aspects that you should remember on or while dealing with the customer. Before dealing out with the client, you should always remember what is the budget and requirement of the client, as these will be the threshold on which you will be stacking your expense. You can consider things like distribute your website work into tasks like - UI (...


1

If you're billing your client hourly, then you should bill for all of the time you spend working on their project. That includes phone calls, meetings, other communication, testing, prototyping, etc., etc.


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