25

[tl;dr: Clients are paying for more than a task to be done, they're paying for you. Understand that, and make that product unique, valuable, and worth every penny.] Here are a few things to keep in mind: Your time is limited: When you're working hourly, the client's not just paying for the work to be done, they're paying for you to do it. A subtle ...


22

I am currently a student with no registered business etc You are required to register (link) with hmrc as self-employed in this case - and while you are at it (assuming profits are below the threshold) register as exempt from Class 2 National Insurance. Failure to register will result in a fine if (when?) you get tagged... What is required on a UK invoice ...


14

I think most of fair freelancers felt the same. I felt the same when I had to charge mother of two, then again when I had to charge a student, and so on. But in the end, simply tell yourself that you have responsibility to your own family, your children, your parents, and so on. And this is the way to feed them, right? The best way to overcome the guilt is ...


14

Generate an invoice marked "past due". Send certified. That's all you can really do in your case, at this step, without getting an attorney involved. The $10,000 is probably more than any state's small claims process. Other than that, don't lift a FINGER until you've been paid in full. You might hear your client trying to bargain with you, but you've ...


11

It's not about advantages, it is about law and also about your clients. In some countries, it is illegal to work without invoicing (France for instance). If you work as a contractor for a company, it is likely that the company will need an invoice for its accounting. Otherwise it will not be possible to justify the expense to the tax authority, and then it ...


11

No. Client pays an invoice. It's up to you to calculate all costs in the invoice or pay part of them yourself. For example, I always pay PayPal's 4%, never ask the client to pay it nor I increase my price for 4%. I treat it as my running costs. Read point 1 :)


9

I tell customers who ask for detailed itemization of time usage that "this is not a service I provide". If pressed, I note that tracking that level of detail for him would create administrative overhead for you, and that you would either have to tack that time on to his bill, or adjust your rates to compensate. Since your goal is to provide value to your ...


9

For SLA agreements you should be able to make an estimate based on fixed tasks and average expected work for improvements/bugs. For fixed tasks: Server costs. If you're paying for this-- add it up and add this to the rest of the total. Don't just absorb it. Outline an update plan. For instance, Update all server software monthly. All device software ...


9

Unless you receive payment, I don't believe you are obligated to do anything. It's your fault to some degree for letting outstanding invoices "build up over time". You should never allow that to happen for any client. If they haven't paid you they don't own anything. I would not even entertain transfer of anything until payment has been made in full. And ...


9

IANAL, nor any form of professional regarding law, let alone Australian law. However, from what I've found from a quick google of Australian copyright law, it seems to conform with most copyright laws throughout the US and EU. Therefore I can only assume that transfer of ownership works similarly. With this assumption, you still seem to be the owner of ...


7

That, my colleague is known as 'scope creep' and is one of the oldest problems known to freelancers. It sounds in like they may be abusing the fact that you are 'not living around the corner'. I avoid working for companies that I cannot drive over to and meet face to face. There are too many people willing to twist things or railroad others in order to ...


7

I don't think those are small reasons, especially the first one. Here's how I would explain it: "I have to set aside time in my schedule to be available if you have questions or problems. That time costs money. If I don't set aside that time and you have an issue, suddenly all my other work has to be dropped by the way-side which is not fair to those other ...


7

Well this is really opinion-based. But there are some aspects to be aware of. Some clients will see your failure to invoice as an "ok" to send you more changes then act shocked when you want to be paid. For this reason you need to be a bit careful with free services. Clients like this just try and roll over you and then start becoming very difficult when ...


7

No. If you invoice for $380, you should receive $380... then if your payment processor has fees, they are deducted from the $380. In no instance is it "okay" for a client to send less than the invoiced amount, for whatever reason. If the client must pay fees, then those fees are their problem they should be paid above and beyond any invoice amount. ...


6

In my experience this is a huge flag. For one reason or another trust has broken down with the client, which is indicative by them asking for an itemized report. One way to salvage the relationship is to simply ask them what is the motivation behind the request for an itemized report? Ask them if they feel like they're getting less than what they paid for? ...


6

Some of the first considerations would be: How many times have you done similar work, what were your costs, time, difficulties. How much will you have to charge just to break even? What profit is necessary to pay yourself and subcontractors, buy new equipment or purchase training to keep yourself current, offset expected cost increases or lean times where ...


6

Generally, clients buy a freelancer's time. Using that logic, all time spent on client work is invoiced, regardless of the work. I never heard of clients wanting different rates for work on prototype versus the actual product - and since both will consume 100% of the freelancers time, it seems reasonable that they cost the same. A reasonable angle could be ...


5

This sounds very close to a retainer style agreement, but with payments in arrears. I don't like this. If you and the client know that it will cost $xxx of money every month, it should be due by the 1st of each month, in advance. That would make it a proper retainer. You need an agreement in place (contract, Scope of Work, etc) to protect you, and the ...


5

I don't think it's necessary. I have invoiced without an address before. I just emailed the person and put their email address and phone number in the area where I normally put an address. But that was just a $25 invoice... I think the real benefit of having an address is it will make it much easier to go after someone in court if they don't pay you. ...


5

The single worst mistake I ever made as a contractor was agreeing to provide source code before payment was made. Don't do it. This doesn't pass the "smell test" at all.


5

the invoice date: last day of the previous month when work was completed (March 31) send invoice the same/next day (March 31 OR April 1st) doesn't make a difference yes: invoice is always generated after work is completed unless otherwise agreed upon. (in case of multi month project OR pre-payment arrangement) hope this helps.


5

If I have a client which needs to run something requiring a license, they purchase a license (through me) so they can continue to use the licensed product. If I purchase a license, it's so I [my company] can legally use the product. So I would be free to show mockups or other things using the product. Then if a client chooses a mockup containing a licensed ...


4

You do not state your location, so that makes things a little bit difficult... Common sense would suggest that (unless regulated within law) you have no legal obligation to pay for someone else's service - and if a customer is declining to pay, then you have no obligation to continue to provide it. Regarding the payment aspects, certainly here in the UK, I ...


4

I'm not a lawyer!! I'll state that again, I am not a lawyer. However, I would think the initial payment of the services would show intent to support the organization and therefore not allow you to claim ownership at this point. You've already established you'd pay for services benefiting the organization. You can no longer wish to pay for the services. ...


4

If you are UK based and not VAT registered then you cannot add VAT to your service charges. You should generate an invoice that just contains details of how to pay you (bank details, paypal, etc) along with either a breakdown of your charges or a total cost, depending upon how you're charging the client. It can be as simple as a plain word doc to get you ...


4

Well you covered most of it. During the research phase when the client is not sure whether he will start the project or not, you will not be able to avoid couple of free hours of work. that's just the way for both of you to realize whether you can finish the project and for the client if he has money for it. If it takes more than a couple of hours that ...


4

As my wife attorney likes to say "Everyone can sue you, but it does not mean he will win" :). Anyway, there are many things unsaid here. Like, are you registered on Freelancer with your real name and family name i.e. can Freelancer anyhow reach to you? The other thing is the price of the project which is too low so I really doubt they would do it, even if ...


4

"I understand that generally after invoicing for a freelancing gig, it may take at least 30 days to receive payment" -- this is incorrect. You have the power to set forth your own payment terms. But you have to do this BEFORE STARTING WORK!!! Don't make the mistake of getting through even a day's work without covering this incredibly important element. ...


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