15

I think the rule is 80/20. 80% of complaints from 20% of customers. It applies to so many things like 20% of your carpet will get 80% of the wear and tear etc. It is a great question and one I have come across myself so I smiled a bit when I saw your question. I have done it the good way and the bad way. The bad way. I wrote to the customer and told them ...


13

If you aren't already charging market value it's highly unlikely you'll retain any existing customers once you do start charging market value. Chances are, clients you currently have are clients because you aren't charging them what anyone else would charge. If you raise your pricing to more standard rates, these clients will most often just go find someone ...


12

The easiest way to handle the short-notice work is to set up a Service Level Agreement (SLA). You can document how much notice the client must give, and how soon you will act, with financial requirements in each direction. Get this agreed, signed by management. Implement a basic ticket handling system and boom, you can bill extra for the urgent stuff. That ...


8

Personal opinion... don't engage too much. If the relationship is damaged, then it's damaged. Get paid and move on. Too much discussion will only inflame issues. In addition, any reduction not cited in the contract shows your willingness to not adhere to the contract itself. This could be interpreted as a failure in the agreement from its inception. The ...


7

Neoflash, If a customer's #1 motivation is to get a service done as cheaply as possible, then you can't fix that whether you are at the pre-service stage, performing the service, or done with it. You just got lucky that it didn't come out sooner. I hope you've cashed any checks from this customer and aren't sitting on them! That same customer can't call ...


6

Directed Choices. Most clients I experience want to feel as though they have input into how things look. I think that's just human nature. The key for me has been to always provide directed choices rather than open-ended questions. What this means in rather than: "What color do you want it?" or "How do you think it should look?" You ask something ...


3

Like @AlexD said, it depends on the license agreement. Also, did you pay for the vendor product? If it's free or open source then you can 100% forget about compensation. If you paid and they advertised certain functionality that simply didn't exist or clearly not functioning, you may have a small chance because then they could be held liable to some degree....


3

We won't tell you what needs to be done for your particular needs, but we can help with a business plan. Essentially, you want a road map for how your business is going to succeed. How will customers find you? How will you do your marketing? When do you expect to be profitable? How much do you anticipate you will invest in your business? There are ...


3

Quiet confidence gets me the kind of clients I want. Bold, boisterous, technical arrogance often garners clients I don't want. It all comes down to a person's selling style really. I actually get more clients because I don't use jargon or technical-speak when explaining things. I rely on cues from clients as to the level of techno-speak I'll use. I'll ...


3

While it is annoying having other people show off, this could work to your advantage, as the contrast between their redundant word-salad and your client-targeted communication will be quite evident. Don't assume clients are always easily 'impressed' by tech-speak. Many smaller clients prefer a technical partner/advisor who will speak their language. A good ...


3

I don´t think there are any "business norms" on support after cancellation of a contract. As already stated by @candied_orange, if it's not in the contract it doesn't exist I think it would seem unprofessional to hands-down reject a request for support. If any service is requested upon by the client, the least would be to talk to them about the conditions ...


3

YOU are in charge of how the client (or their staff) treat you. People will walk all over you if you allow them to. But they will also learn to plan better if you refuse to let them. So it's your choice how you want to "train" your clients. During initial exploratory conversations with clients, I make a few important facts as clear as I can: I do NOT, by ...


3

Agree with the answer stating that you will not be able to retain current clients. Once you've 'anchored' your price level, it turns out to be virtually impossible to change it. In addition, new freelancers tend to undervalue their own services, because they find the work relatively straight-forward and therefore don't charge by the value it gives the ...


2

Google Calendar, Google Spreadsheet and Google Drive are great for these tasks, are free and accessible from desktop and apps anywhere anytime.


2

I would suggest adding language to your contract specifying how many design revisions will be allowed, free-of-charge. Be frank with your client when discussing this part of the contract and tell them the reason the clause is there is because in the past an inordinate amount of time has been wasted (on both sides) re-hashing minor design details. When you ...


2

Make sure all your invoices with this customer are paid first. Use this: "due to changes in our business model," or "due to changes in our business priorities", blah blah blah, "as of (some date) we will no longer be able to support your needs as one of our customers." There's no need to get into the details as to why. Don't refer the customer to anyone ...


1

In the world of contracting if it's not in the contract it doesn't exist. That said, if people come to me with questions about systems I've touched in the past I'm generally willing to provide a few answers. But if that's not in a contract that's not something anyone has any right to expect of me. That's just me being a friendly nerd who likes to talk shop....


1

This is a tough issue, but goes to show that extra planning ahead of time would work wonders for the client, and for you as the expert. Coming from a SysAdmin-type standpoint, maintaining one server is every easy, and most could be scripted or documented for the client to do it. I would spend some good time on this, as you could use the documentation for ...


1

I've used a self hosted solution called 'Freelancer Office' that does similar tasks, I'm sure there will be others out there. You list an item and can then add that item to an invoice. It's a good all in one solution however it would be another system to back up and maintain and you obviously have a hosting cost attached. Link to the system I referenced: ...


1

I'm going to play devil's advocate, I guess. The comment, the better we are at our job, the harder it is for the customer to see the value in our services (holy %$?! that seemed easy, quick and effortless, why the hell am I giving you so much money?) causes me to raise an eyebrow. Maybe it's a tactical error, but what are you doing letting your ...


1

I did not read the entire thing.. just the first paragraph synopsis. ... (real scenario, not fabricated) I purchased a Adobe Photoshop.... While using Photoshop I discover a few "show stopping" bugs, primarily due to how I use the application and my particular system. Nonetheless clear bugs in the software. I detail these bugs and go back and forth with ...


1

It's very important that you talk very well with your client, before starting to work, to understand as much as possible what he expects to see in his web site. This is a crucial part that when well done will save you from hours of pointless work. Write a sketch on paper togheter with the client, that represent the layout and decide the colors, when done ...


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