17

You are not loosing clients because they are not your target group yet. The clients that are asking for portfolio are looking for experienced webmaster. Sad but true, but most of them are not interested in hiring someone that hasn't done at least a couple of projects. They want to be sure that you really can do the things and secondly, they also want to see ...


13

The best advice I can give, as this is precisely the issue that I faced, is to build yourself a website that will act as your portfolio and let that website itself act as the showcase piece that shows off your talents. You can include a projects area in which you can add screenshots to those websites that you are comfortable showcasing and (very ...


13

Knowing an entire API or framework inside and out is not really necessary. Every project I've worked on in 10 years of freelancing has involved something new that I've never done before. You are "qualified" when someone is willing to hire you. And the only way to find out if you are is to put yourself out there. BUT...there is much more to being ready for ...


12

It depends on the tax system that applies to you, but there can be consequences, and they can be very severe. Generally economic activity is defined as oriented on profit, so giving anything for free could qualify as self-promotion or donation. In Poland, for example, only some costs of the company spend on promotion can be considered as tax costs. So in ...


12

I usually try to do it in the form of a case study instead of worrying about screen shots. My case study would include the following: Overall goal of the application How it helps the customer's business Some interesting technical features What technologies the application uses If possible, I include the organization's name, but if not, I just say something ...


10

There are a few things you probably need to ask yourself before trying to book projects / find agencies to work through (although I know much less about how agencies operate). Your's is a unique question in that you're new to both software development and freelancing. Can you build it?: Whatever projects you're trying to win (either a specific project, or ...


9

You just have to start like all of us. I had 10 years of experience when started freelancing and even thou I was a beginner for remote clients. So to answer your questions. I'm good written, reading and medium as speaker in english. Work on your English. The language barrier may be larger obstacle than lack of knowledge. At least perfect your passive ...


8

I wasn't sure whether to post this as a comment, as it's not a direct answer to the question, but it is relevant(ish)... Your experience prior to the job is valid (whether freelance or otherwise) and will certainly be considered by prospective employers when assessing your CV. On the other hand, and making an assumption, if the role you have been employed ...


8

I spent a good amount of time looking into this and there doesn't appear to be any general "community" where non-profits and volunteers interact (no less one specialized in websites). I couldn't even find a general community where volunteers interacted with other volunteers. There are some specialized forums for specific groups. But, there are a number of ...


8

As a freelancer and a client, I look for a 'genuine' person. Don't hide behind a silly company name Put your picture everywhere, doing all kinds of things. Whatever you link to or reference, make sure it's updated/still live/has no bugs. Most portfolios are complete junk, and there's no reason for it. If you have a Facebook/Twitter/Blog/etc, keep them up ...


8

This answer is based upon my 20 years experience of having legal departments review testimonials and approve/refuse edits. I am not a lawyer though. Almost every piece I design has many, many testimonials and they almost always go through that company's legal department for review. So, while I'm not a lawyer myself, I've gotten familiar with what I can and ...


7

Speaking from experience, I'd always say it's better to show a few key projects than nothing at all. From a clients point of view they need at least a little bit of proof that you can design. Why would they risk hiring somebody who seems to have no track record of working on any projects? Your number one goal at the minute seems to be getting some more ...


6

I won't tell you all the fluff that you can find in books and other resources. You are ready when: Cash: You need cash. I know this isn't a technical requirement, but unless you are a rock star, starting out will be slow. Even if you have a good reputation as an employee, people may look at you with some distrust. I mean, they don't know you, so what will ...


6

The biggest misconception most have is that you can just decide you want to freelance and then do it successfully. That's most often not the case. Unless the skills you provide are something tangible like auto-repair or landscaping. Conceptual services such as web dev and design require a track record of success and a proven ability to complete projects. ...


6

As a beginner, try to keep your prices low, but not so low that it gives off an image of low quality. Add all the keywords that are relevant to your services. Also, along with keeping your images and description clear yet catchy, try adding proofs of your capabilities. For this, Fiverr allows you to take tests for different domains. You can also add ...


5

There is no design that is better for SEO - there are rules for content, the only way a single page app could rank higher than a multi-page app is by the content you are showing off. Basically, one of the most basic rules would be to have more than 15% relevant text content on a page. In most multi-page apps this is not possible and because of that, a single-...


5

If you haven't signed an NDA, and have no contract in place for the work that mentions this, then posting the work on your site would seem to be fair use. I would also infer that there is no obvious legal obligation either way here. If the client does have an objection then they can request you remove the images. I believe the worst case scenario here would ...


5

TL;DR: I don't think that this would be OK. The best course of action would be to make your own designs (even if they're for example sites) and use those for your "samples". Your clients would get a great feel for how you design, which is what you want to showcase. Let's examine what Fair Use entails: Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. §...


5

Depending upon the nature of your freelancing, your targeted financial goals, and your client base -- the proper thing to do would be to hire someone that can create what you need if you have no experience with it. That being posted you can do it yourself, by all means. My point is, if freelancing in whatever field is your business... treat it like a ...


5

A degree is only required when laws require it. Such as.... (in the United States) A PhD is mandatory to be a doctor. Passing the Bar is mandatory to be an attorney, etc. Unless laws require a profession to be licensed or have educational minimums, then no you do not need to have a degree to freelance. Having a degree will almost always put you above job ...


4

Freelancing experience does count. I have taken roles at companies based on my combined experience at "a real company" along with my freelance experience. A lot of it comes to your approach and your presentation of your experience. If you pitch your experience as having two jobs and building a customer base instead of "just something I did on the side", it ...


4

My advice would be to simply be up front. Note that you did not do any design work, and that you can only offer the last 6 months for the reasons you stated. The right kind of clients will be understanding, and may in fact respect that you are not disclosing old code because it is proprietary. Often times when showcasing your work, you can simply put "...


4

I would not want to upset the client but a counter proposal might be appropriate where you can offer to do some more SEO work on the website to strengthen their position and add additional entries that will push down your own search result for the website! It might also be a temporary problem that fixes itself after a few weeks once the new website has more ...


4

A portfolio does need to be at least somewhat visual. My original UX design portfolio consisted entirely of text. (At the time, the portfolio site itself was also the only item in my portfolio!) Text is, not surprisingly, not the best way to communicate what I have done on my interaction design and visual design projects. When I met with the CEO of ...


4

Absolutely! You are not writing the code for a customer, so you don't need permission, especially if you learned how to do something. Created a marquee on a website? Sure, show it off! Create a beautiful, stunning, responsive website that works on mobile devices and desktop computers of all shapes and sizes? Show it off! The point of the portfolio is to ...


4

Showing work you have completed as a freelancer is obviously preferable. Whether you can legally show the work you did for a previous employer will depend on your employment contract and/or whether you signed an NDA. Those things aside, you should be fine. It's worth bearing in mind that the copyright for each site will be owned either by your previous ...


4

Uhm, YES. They are not allowed. Non-Disclosure means you can't tell anyone what you worked on. That includes showing it off in a portfolio. If you would like to display the work in your portfolio you need to specifically discuss that with the client and get an written addendum to the NDA which specifically states what you can display in a portfolio. But I ...


4

No — this may seem to a large extent both unhealthy and unethical in my humble opinion. You've worked for the agency and as such can have this reflected in your CV, with your core duties and responsibilities, without exposing any customer information or claiming direct/indirect credit for a specific product/services unless with express written permission/...


4

As a freelancer myself, I always ask upfront if the client lets me show their project on my portfolio. Most of them would say "okay" but some of them would say "no." If they say "no," I would honor their request and not share the project with anyone. Next time you're interested in showcasing a client's work on your portfolio, simply ask for a permission. ...


3

If you are a developer, and not a designer, then I expect that potential clients are really only after acquiring your ability to write good code. This is the exact same situation that I am in and I have had huge success with my blog where I regularly write small articles which solve specific coding problems in my main language (WPF/XAML/C'#). I also am a ...


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