Hot answers tagged

15

Imagine you're walking down the street... some stranger walks up to you.... "Hi. I'm Johnny. I am a professional stylist. I would like to point out that your haircut is not the correct cut for your head shape. That shirt is outdated by about 20 years and your shoes don't match the rest of your outfit. I can help you with this if you hire me." So, the ...


11

I think there are some factors to consider. The general "aggressiveness" of your marketing strategy: As Scott pointed out in his answer, you might offend or insult people with your offer. This is however no general excuse not to try it. Of course, there may be vaild/commonly accepted reasons for being upset, but people could also dislike your offer because ...


11

You may feel rude but at the end of the day it's your business. If they come back the second time you should give less information than you provided on their first visit, but tell them you can give them a more thorough explanation if they booked an appointment. Alternatively stop giving away free information. When someone calls/comes to see you with their ...


7

I would advise the client, and ask if they wish to proceed...if not then I would bill for the time owed. You will show that you have integrity, the client will be pleased and may send you referrals or do business with you in the future.


7

Heres the thing.... You need to have a conversation with the client. Not emails, not texts, not instant messages, but a conversation as in speaking via telephone, Skype, or in person. The is no way you are going to adequately express your concerns via any text delivery method. Text is heard in the reader's voice not the writers. So, if the client is at all ...


7

In short, the answer is 'no', it's certainly not inappropriate to advertise potential vacancies on your linkedin page, but you need to understand that at that point you're basically moonlighting as a stunted recruiter, passing suitable candidates along to other recruiters who claim that they'll pay you a small finder's-fee for helping them to place a ...


6

I would say to go ahead, offering fixes for problems, even if they don't realize they have problems. I wrote about this as well with another answer, about SPIN selling. You created the Situation - Web site usability is not as good as it could be across enough devices. The Problem is that it can cause people to not use their website - that they pay for. The ...


5

Yes, it´s probably billable time but ... Morally and depending on jurisdiction and contract, you have the obligation towards your client to make the best use of his paid time - going to the Supermarket/Watch may pose a problem. You normally also have the obligation to advise him to the best of your knowledge, so you should make suggestions how to make more ...


5

I can't do any other tasks for my work Then yes it is billable time. Perhaps at a reduced rate due to it being "waiting time" as opposed to "active time". But that's your call. I'd have a hard time billing my standard rate if I was watching TV or running to the store merely because my system was busy with a task. But then, I'd have at least 2 systems if my ...


5

There are three issues here in terms of billing and expense: The setup time for the laptop itself: If you're billing by the hour and they've sent you equipment that needed to be set up to allow you to work in their environment (installing software, registering phones, creating emails and accounts, etc), you absolutely should be billing them for the hour/s ...


4

Are you working on-site or remotely? Seems like on-site work. If you are working together with this guy, I can understand who you feel. Working environment for me is a thing which will push me work cheaper (for good team) or more expensive / leave (when team is bad). Leaving for this reason is not silly at all. Things that bother you will influence your ...


3

As you've correctly determined, you're speaking to the wrong people with the wrong priorities. HR's problem is that they've been given a job that needs filling. Their task (as they see it) is to find suitable candidates for that job and to screen out all of the people who're unsuitable for that job. You fall very firmly into the latter category. By ...


3

You are no longer at Company A, correct? You have nothing to worry about legally and they know it which is why they used the word "ethically". They sound like petty bullies to me and if an excel template gives them such an itch then they have bigger problems with their company. If it was created by someone else there and you took it, that's different, but ...


3

Business is business. If you don't do his work, others will. Make the most of it, and if it makes you feel unhappy, try to wrap it as soon as possible. Better yet, try to find another gig in the meantime, and when that's all set in, raise the price on the russian client. He'll either insist, or compensate fairly well, to shed your tears away.


3

If your intention is to treat your financial services freelancer as a Personal Assistant then there's absolutely nothing wrong with that, as long as you understand that they'll almost certainly quit if you don't give them warning them in advance and gain their agreement. Holding someone to the fine print of an employment contract is notoriously difficult and ...


3

Ethical? Yes. Effective? Probably not. When a company has made the decision to hire a full time employee and told a manager to find one, that manager rarely will accept a contractor. The person who can change that decision is above that manager. When you enter the process through the full time employee hiring process, it is hard to break through and talk to ...


2

...how can you ensure that they do not use it for any illegal purposes? Especially when their work is used in multiple countries? You cannot. But if someone asks me to write a module that secretly stores keystrokes and email them somewhere, then I would probably decline the job. Use your common sense, is it a registered company, is it fairly innocuous ...


2

Be honest and completely communicative. This is in no way unprofessional. One keynote here is that you're not some random cold caller. You are a user of their website and their service. Or at least you are a user of their website and potentially of their service. Be open about it. Example text: Hi, I came across your website looking for local appliance ...


2

I promised myself years ago to never use my powers for evil :) For me, first and foremost is my well being, that includes mental well being as well. I dislike supporting products/services I personally find offensive. They leave a sticky, gross, felling on me. This is different than work on a product service to support something I don't believe in. I've ...


2

Imagine the following situation, you say client that the software they need exists. They start using it and not pay for your time. The reality is the following, you would have troubles with them if and when you build custom software by yourself. It means that customer would be unreliable and honestly, why would you want to work with such client? Another ...


2

You tell them about the software already built and you won't get paid for anything no even your research. If that's ok with you then go ahead, you will save a lot of trouble and time. If not then just build the app and learn, have fun and get paid for being a professional developer.


2

It is shady. Invoices are your business records. They reflect your income. You should never add anything to any invoice which your business is not directly responsible for. The client is asking you to put yourself in an untenable position. Refuse to add random items or provide anything editable. No one should ever need to edit an invoice you send them. ...


2

As a freelancer who provides "Financial Planning" services, that is, stock, precious metal or cryptocurrency trading consultancy and direction to my clients, I definitely won't be happy about it. What you want is: "Need assistant for a monthly contract requiring stock trading/finance-related work". That means, you have not negotiated ...


1

You are right in thinking this. Sharing information from one employer to another is a violation of GDPR. Unless you have explicit permission to show the briefs to another company, you would be committing an offence. Of course, you could try to anonymise or redact the briefs so that the original customer is hidden. It depends on what information the briefs ...


1

It sounds to me that the client is merely unfamiliar with how to express their desires in a form you can ingest and use. They don't understand how to write a brief that you will find useful. To this end, you may not need to share an actual client brief with them. Simply sending an outline of the items you need to be aware of may be sufficient. A bulleted ...


1

I would say this is more a battle with your own conscience than anything else. As a programmer, I can easily share some samples of my work, but it’s much different for a copywriter. However legally, if you didn’t sign a non-disclosure with your customer you’re free to share with your client. Best of luck!


1

The legal ramifications depend on the contract - assuming there is one. However, I would concentrate on the relationship you have or wish to establish with the agency. Since you state you are a new employer, I'm assuming there's no long time bond worth keeping - so you basically just want to pay as little as possible, regardless of what the future ...


1

Short answer: no code delivery = no payment. If he is not asking, why worry ? From your description, the faulty is more him, making you waste time by promising a solution then "blackmailing" you.


1

Unfortunately, as a contractor this is very common and usual. I'd never CC, invite my contractors, give credits to them, no way under any possible scenario. Of course, I'd pay them generally at a rate they're happy with. You can't get both; you're external to the organization, so you have more freedom than as an employee. You also have less expectation. For ...


1

What does the contract that you signed say? If there is anything in there that says "WORK FOR HIRE" then you have given up your rights to the IP that you've created. It means that the hiring entity owns all your work. It does NOT mean that you can't take credit for the work you do within the organization (i.e. internally to peers, bosses and other staff). ...


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