Hot answers tagged

15

Imagine you're walking down the street... some stranger walks up to you.... "Hi. I'm Johnny. I am a professional stylist. I would like to point out that your haircut is not the correct cut for your head shape. That shirt is outdated by about 20 years and your shoes don't match the rest of your outfit. I can help you with this if you hire me." So, the ...


11

I think there are some factors to consider. The general "aggressiveness" of your marketing strategy: As Scott pointed out in his answer, you might offend or insult people with your offer. This is however no general excuse not to try it. Of course, there may be vaild/commonly accepted reasons for being upset, but people could also dislike your offer because ...


11

You may feel rude but at the end of the day it's your business. If they come back the second time you should give less information than you provided on their first visit, but tell them you can give them a more thorough explanation if they booked an appointment. Alternatively stop giving away free information. When someone calls/comes to see you with their ...


7

I would advise the client, and ask if they wish to proceed...if not then I would bill for the time owed. You will show that you have integrity, the client will be pleased and may send you referrals or do business with you in the future.


6

Heres the thing.... You need to have a conversation with the client. Not emails, not texts, not instant messages, but a conversation as in speaking via telephone, Skype, or in person. The is no way you are going to adequately express your concerns via any text delivery method. Text is heard in the reader's voice not the writers. So, if the client is at all ...


6

I would say to go ahead, offering fixes for problems, even if they don't realize they have problems. I wrote about this as well with another answer, about SPIN selling. You created the Situation - Web site usability is not as good as it could be across enough devices. The Problem is that it can cause people to not use their website - that they pay for. The ...


5

I can't do any other tasks for my work Then yes it is billable time. Perhaps at a reduced rate due to it being "waiting time" as opposed to "active time". But that's your call. I'd have a hard time billing my standard rate if I was watching TV or running to the store merely because my system was busy with a task. But then, I'd have at least 2 systems if my ...


4

Are you working on-site or remotely? Seems like on-site work. If you are working together with this guy, I can understand who you feel. Working environment for me is a thing which will push me work cheaper (for good team) or more expensive / leave (when team is bad). Leaving for this reason is not silly at all. Things that bother you will influence your ...


3

You are no longer at Company A, correct? You have nothing to worry about legally and they know it which is why they used the word "ethically". They sound like petty bullies to me and if an excel template gives them such an itch then they have bigger problems with their company. If it was created by someone else there and you took it, that's different, but ...


3

Yes, it´s probably billable time but ... Morally and depending on jurisdiction and contract, you have the obligation towards your client to make the best use of his paid time - going to the Supermarket/Watch may pose a problem. You normally also have the obligation to advise him to the best of your knowledge, so you should make suggestions how to make more ...


3

Business is business. If you don't do his work, others will. Make the most of it, and if it makes you feel unhappy, try to wrap it as soon as possible. Better yet, try to find another gig in the meantime, and when that's all set in, raise the price on the russian client. He'll either insist, or compensate fairly well, to shed your tears away.


2

...how can you ensure that they do not use it for any illegal purposes? Especially when their work is used in multiple countries? You cannot. But if someone asks me to write a module that secretly stores keystrokes and email them somewhere, then I would probably decline the job. Use your common sense, is it a registered company, is it fairly innocuous ...


2

Be honest and completely communicative. This is in no way unprofessional. One keynote here is that you're not some random cold caller. You are a user of their website and their service. Or at least you are a user of their website and potentially of their service. Be open about it. Example text: Hi, I came across your website looking for local ...


2

I promised myself years ago to never use my powers for evil :) For me, first and foremost is my well being, that includes mental well being as well. I dislike supporting products/services I personally find offensive. They leave a sticky, gross, felling on me. This is different than work on a product service to support something I don't believe in. I've ...


2

Imagine the following situation, you say client that the software they need exists. They start using it and not pay for your time. The reality is the following, you would have troubles with them if and when you build custom software by yourself. It means that customer would be unreliable and honestly, why would you want to work with such client? Another ...


2

You tell them about the software already built and you won't get paid for anything no even your research. If that's ok with you then go ahead, you will save a lot of trouble and time. If not then just build the app and learn, have fun and get paid for being a professional developer.


1

The legal ramifications depend on the contract - assuming there is one. However, I would concentrate on the relationship you have or wish to establish with the agency. Since you state you are a new employer, I'm assuming there's no long time bond worth keeping - so you basically just want to pay as little as possible, regardless of what the future ...


1

To be candid, I think you'd be better of spending your money on a few pints than chopping down trees and throwing them to the wind. :) I've been traveling around the world doing web and software development for about two decades now. Dropping of pamphlets is as effective as direct mail marketing (it's not). Since you are in the web & design business, you ...


1

I think it depends heavily on a few things: Your region. Do businesses usually drop off leaflets? Cost. You need to print the leaflets somehow, and that will be a cost to your business. If you're just starting out, it may not be feasible, depending on your circumstances. If you've been in operation for quite some time, then it should be a moot point. Leg ...


1

Short answer: no code delivery = no payment. If he is not asking, why worry ? From your description, the faulty is more him, making you waste time by promising a solution then "blackmailing" you.


1

Be prepared for various personalities of site owners. Some would appreciate your offer where solid fix/change for reasonable price can introduce you to further business with them. Others (sometimes considering themselves to be "practical") will suggest that you are attempting to waste energy on nonsense, because "who cares about the details". The more ...


1

I don't use upwork... but I'd respond to this the same way as if someone were to ask me to give them my social security number..... "No thanks. I'm not interested." And move on. I would have never had the conversation you had. I would have excused myself the moment purchasing my profile was presented. The thing is you don't want to be a memorable ...


1

I am not surprised :). This person has probably be banned and cannot attach his credit card or pass verification process. I am surprised you had nerves to talk to much to him. I also saw guys asking you to open the account as they cannot do it. But mainly that is not true. I was asked to do this for PayPal: just open an account and remove your credit ...


1

I look at it like this: If I give $1 to a panhandler then it is not my responsibility what he/she does with it. Of course I don't give any money to just anybody with their hand out. I at least take a look and see if they look hungry. And definitely will not give any to someone with a sign out that says "Give me money so I can buy illegal ..."


1

I don't know where you are but in Europe, in general, the law works like this: If you are an employee everything that you produce when you work for a company it's intellectual property of the company. You have no rights to reuse anything. If you are a freelance (an external indipendent company) everything that you produce for any of your clients it's your ...


1

My opinion is that Company A is correct. Possibly even legally, but I am not an attorney. By your own admission, Company A, or its employees, assisted in creation, development, and improvement of this template making them a co-creator. It would be a reasonable expectation that Company A was improving the work for their benefit and not for distribution. You ...


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