4

A better approach than simply sending a connection request directly to a potential client is to find a common connection that you both have, who you can ask to forward an introduction to your client-in-waiting. That way you can compose an introductory message that explains why it would be valuable to the client to create a connection with you. Provided ...


3

Just put it down. Write a simple description about it if the nature of the project is not obvious from the title. If you're putting it in a website, than a few screenshots should sell the idea. If it's for your resume, than screenshots are not necessary. Your potential employer will likely ask you more about it if he is interested. Companies also come and ...


3

Yes and no. What connections gives you is a possibility of greater exposure and presence. It isn't much and you have to work it but it is something, if used as one tool among many. I would not expect LinkedIn or Facebook connections to be directly turned into leads, but the more people you can reach, the better. Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. provide good ...


1

Well, Yes and No. Will listing those project make you look unserious? Then not. If those project were regular ones you've got and finalized, then why not. The bottom line is that "the more the better" is not always true. If you have a good portfolio with multiple long-term projects, then I would list them as the first one. Besides them, I would mention ...


1

Recruiters often find potentially interesting profiles and are sending connection requests. They do that usually to send job offer. Having a lot of recruiters in contacts is especially good idea for freelancers and contractors specializing in short-term contracts. You can easily send signal that you are free now or your project is about to change now and ...


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