11

Absolutely not! If you have agreed on terms, and delivered, then you should expect him to deliver on his part of the arrangement. Having said that... Did you give him status updates with the opportunity for feedback? Did he understand the limitations he put in place for you? Does he seem to want to continue to use you if you keep working for him? These ...


8

Bill him for the hours you spend on the phone. Those are consulting hours. No further work will proceed until the account is brought current. All future phone conversations will also be billed. I went from disliking these type of clients to loving them. we could spend 12 hours on the phone for all I care. I have a Bluetooth so I can multitask and they get to ...


6

It seems to me that you are really still thinking like an employee. If you are a freelancer and have a contract detailing what you've been hired to do, then anything not included in that contract is A) open for discussion/rejection by you and B) due additional compensation. Unless your contract states something like "anything we give you, you complete" In ...


4

You're a victim of scope creep. It's not uncommon, it happens to many, including yours truly. Possibly the ideal way to head it off before it happens is to create a mutually-agreed upon list of features for the current project or iteration, and set it in stone. Add requests for additional features or changes to a list and revisit that at a later point. ...


4

If it were me, considering everything that you've told us, I would tell the client that I can no longer perform work for him and I would terminate the relationship.


4

I'm not certain what you are asking. You have a contract stating you'll complete A for a specified sum. You later discovered completing A will take more time than you estimated. You have 2 options: Stick to your contract and complete A as you agreed and learn to better understand the details of project before providing a pricing. Tell the client you ...


3

It may be too late for this particular project, but when you figure out your hourly rate, you need to account for your "non-billable time" (i.e. business development - proposals, etc - and other administrative activities that aren't directly billable to clients) and roll that into your hourly rates. So proposal development/scoping projects doesn't get a line ...


3

Generally, projects can either be 'fixed amount' or 'time and materials' where an hourly/daily rate is agreed upon. If the client seems to prefer a fixed amount, one usually adds the time used estimating to the total cost of the project. If the project is paid by the hour, one usually does not visibly charge for the up-front estimations, unless the client ...


3

In most businesses, the time it takes to write a quote is seen as a loss-leader -- the price you must pay if you want the actual work (which does pay). So no, you generally do not charge for the time it takes to quote/bid a project.


3

The Scope of Work is the second essential contract you need signed before you start working; the first is the contract, of course. Let's go over a few small things first: You are the expert. Do not forget this. You would not be jumping into freelancing, expecting to make thousands (millions?) of dollars if you didn't know what you were doing. No, this means ...


2

Matlab is good for fleshing out system performance and designing system mockups prior to prototyping. It is NOT viable for production systems. Matlab is really good for the following: Imaging problems/systems Control systems and design (simulink) DSP, filters, and linear systems Physical optics and light propagation Matlab is ok for: Machine learning/...


2

It seems that you need to formalize your change-request process a bit better. Yes, allow the client to make changes along the way. But if you are charging 50% up front for the initial project, generate an estimate on the change requests also and charge 50% on the change request before starting any work. You have to be fair to yourself. If a client ...


2

"I'm sorry to cut this short, but I need to attend to other things. We'll speak again later. Thanks." If you let someone run over you, they will continue to do so. Take control of your own business.


2

Do you have a contract and a scope of work for the original work up to this point? If so, then this is your "proof" as to what the client originally agreed to and you can ask for payment for services rendered and enter into a new contract and scope of work for what the client wants now. If not, then you can: Do the new work for free. Refuse to do the new ...


2

Generally speaking time you spend on a proposal is the 'cost of sales', i.e. the time and effort you spend on drafting proposals, doing presales meetings etc. In your case, scoping the project in such level of detail is considered part of the executing of the project. So what you have done is work that I personally would only be doing when the contract was ...


1

We use VOIP because our workers can be out and about doing personal things and still answer the call if they want to. As a single business member, this may be something for you to think about as well. This one way of keeping your personal contacts and business contacts separated if you need to save them. You do not have to do a lot of scrolling to find ...


1

I'd get a second cell... for business. Cell providers generally offer decent rates for a second line/device. Why even bother with a land line and another company in today's age. A second cell means you can take client calls if you aren't at your desk. You could also use something a google number and forward it to your current cell. That way you know anything ...


1

I'd charge my day rate as a base. You can figure day rate, based upon desired annual salary here If work is expected to go into late hours of the day, and extend well past 8hrs per day, then I'd double my day rate.. 16hrs per day. Then multiply by total days of work. So for a7 days... day rate x 14 Granted that only leaves 8hr to sleep then start working ...


1

I guess you're going to lose money on this one. If a client ever has the ability to add unknown requirements at a later time after you sign a contract, then doing a fixed-price contract is a very unwise way to go. You can only do a fixed price for a fixed scope of work. Otherwise, you bill for your time and the client can introduce as many surprises as ...


1

I've seen someone considering this time taken to plan the scope of projects, summing it to the cost of planning projects refused by clients and spreading proportionally to the projects of the following year: the cost of little projects is increased by a little, the cost of big projects is increased by a greater amount. Maybe this is feasible when you have a ...


1

The answers above are pretty much what I'd write. The only thing I did not see addressed is the fact that this is your first client. Taking that fact into account I would work with the client and do your best to come out with a client not having worked for free. See what your client says. Perhaps his expectation of having a fast planner are beyond your ...


1

I would always go for option 2. When one undertakes month-long projects involving products or methods not used before in the given context or company, situations like this are bound to happen. So the problem is not that unexpected things happened, but perhaps that you have not managed the client's expectations as well as you could have. The right course of ...


1

I'd firstly say: don't do cheap underpriced projects! Now, you conduct seems OK. I would do the same. You agreed on one things, they started adding new features without wanting to compensate extra work, so it's smart you froze the work. Don't abandon the client, just keep asking him will you complete the project or not. Once he pays one milestone, go to ...


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