17

I don't worry about it much to be honest. I concentrate on deadlines not every minute of my day. I choose to work to live, not live to work. I do not focus on billable and non-billable hours. That's too much like a 9 to 5 job. I know I need to make $XXXX this month. If I have 1 project which does that, that's all I need. If I have 4, then I have to complete ...


10

I agree with @Apfelsaft above. Freelancers are service providers. If you are getting the service, and you are happy with the bill, then look to other areas of your business that you can improve on. If you are getting the service and not happy with the bill, try find compromise or else throw them overboard and replace them. Let's say you do nit pick how ...


9

There is no clear cut right or wrong; it all comes down to your working relationship and which processes the two parties agree on contractually and during the project. Since you seem to want to continue the relationship, I suggest you pay the bill and keep this episode in mind when negotiating the next project. Turning what I believe is a misunderstanding ...


9

Absolutely! If you did the work you were expected to do, and there was an agreement in place beforehand (even verbal), then I'd expect you to send them a bill. This client may decide not to pay it, given that "you didn't fix it yourself", but you still need to show that your time is valuable! Hopefully, lesson learned. In a previous job, when I was ...


8

Keep doing what you do. It is a good filter method which protects and helps you get rid of clients that want cheap labor or quick fixes. I cannot find anything wrong with your method of estimating the amount of time you find necessary for getting the work done. If this is what you need to deliver quality, then there is no reason to change. Not if your ...


6

A continuation of my sarcastic comment. You cannot! Period! He can work 1h and rip you for 7, or he can work 14 and report 10. There are tools to record screenshots of this workspace and monitor number of keyboard strikes and mouse moves. But I can personally guarantee that they can trick that as well. I've been a lead of team where this tool told me they ...


5

Welcome to reality! :) Either those clients are looking for cheap work or you really suck in estimation. Kidding about the later ;). You can try things like this: separate estimation to most ideal, medium, and worst case estimation separate estimation to its basic unit and then evaluate each. separate testing from coding, make sure it's visible try giving ...


5

What you have there is a very important question... One which I asked myself many years ago... Unlike Scott, I DO worry about it to be honest. However like others, I didn't want my answer to be so long but then once I started typing, I couldn't stop... There are mainly two types of freelancers. Part time Full time The main source of income for Part time ...


5

It is never easy to negotiate after the fact. When doing any type of project it is important to set the expectations ahead of time. In your case, you could have estimated that your effort would be in the X-Y hour range or if the client would be paying for accepted images rather than time and materials. Some of the benefits to this approach are: The ...


4

A way to do it, is to estimate the value of the CPU processing time against your gross margin on a regular (monthly/yearly) basis, versus a previous period (month/year). Example: Last month you've made $10.000. You have 10 CPUs. 5 of them account for 125 hours of CPU processing time/month. You've estimated that the CPUs processing time ...


3

I always include every discount on any invoice. Even if the discount amounts to 100%. Why? Well... The client see the added value they are receiving. If I should have trouble collecting the amount due, there's a written record of the discount provided. And that discount can be rescinded if payment is not made. So if collections becomes necessary, I can go ...


3

Estimate more, charge less in the end. The customer will thank you and think you're amazing! First off, why do you need to break it down so much? That to me is a sign of a customer not trusting you... Which can turn it into a toxic relationship. Do your estimate yourself, and deliver a final price, based on projects that size and magnitude. Do not let the ...


3

Principle Although I do like to have a routine, I tend to operate more on priorities rather than a routine. Dr. Stephen Covey authored a book called "The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People" wherein he explains the Time Management Matrix (pictured below). Basically, I try to operate within this grid. I have some set priorities in each quadrant and as ...


3

I would say that if it's a special API that is very restrictive in who has access, and the client is dead-set on using it, they need to pay for it. Notice I included a few rules for that... The CLIENT needs to say they need to use it, and that no other common API would meet their needs. If this is the case, then absolutely, you should charge for that time. ...


3

Well, if it was indeed clearly understood by the client that you provided an estimate, then yes, it's okay to open a discussion with the client about additional time. Ideally, you should do this as soon as you are getting close to the original estimate. You can then negotiate with the client as to what may be needed to cover the additional time required. If ...


3

Distraction occurs in normal job as well as while freelancing. The difference is that in freelancing you get less money so I'd say you're more motivated in freelancing to be as productive as possible. For the best works to plan for every day what I do. My plan is fixed and looks like this: wake up 7.30 drink coffee by the computer reading news and ...


2

Ah, the freelance conundrum! It's obviously impossible to know if somebody will like or dislike something as subjective as design. However there are a few things you can do to minimise the risk: First, get as much information pre-project as possible. Put together a questionnaire that answers questions about their target audience, competitors and how they ...


2

Don't sell yourself short. It's really not worth it. The type of client that complains that a task will take two hours is the same client that would sue the pants off a building contractor for using substandard materials and cutting corners, even in the case where the client has pressured the contractor to work as cheaply as possible. The next time this ...


2

I want to second Scott's answer regarding "not worrying about it". When I take freelance jobs, I schedule a delivery date for the finished product and that's pretty much it. During a project I'll occasionally schedule meetings with the client to clarify or obtain needed materials or feedback. But that's as close as I get to a time clock or a calendar. I ...


2

It is customary to not charge for time waiting on client responses. Where it gets tricky is if time constraints make delayed client responses difficult on you. In those instances I find it often best to notify the client that without a response you can not move forward and the closer to any deadline, if present, things get the possibility of rush fees may ...


2

This depends how you invoice. If I let myself be persuaded in giving a fixed quote, I don´t even show any hour to the client. He just gets function X: Price $ 1,000 (Internally I calculate my hourly rate and add a risk-margin X to it) If I am paid by the hour an have to give an estimate, I make sure I communicate this as estimate and deliver a time-sheet ...


2

When I work with freelancers I request a timesheet which includes hours worked per day and a small description of what they did. (I deliver the same to my clients). And I think that's as good as it gets, verify the hours with the description, as long as that makes sense it's fine (i.e. number of hours worked are reasonable for the task they performed). If ...


1

I have grappled with this problem as well. If this is a client that you will get additional work from, even perhaps of the same parameters as the first job, you almost have to make them aware of those extra hours, even if you don’t charge them this time ... for the simple reason you don’t want to have to continually give the client those extra hours free of ...


1

You can't control how many hours they work (obviously), but you can protect yourself by opening up lines of communication. I do freelance on the side, and one thing I do to protect myself and the client is log all of the hours I worked, with small descriptions of what work was accomplished in that time. I also meet with my clients over Skype ever 1 to 3 ...


1

No project ever is completed in perfection. Just look at the updates from your own operating systems. Expecting that is unrealistic. If money in closed projects is an issue,create a separation between project work and maintenance. That is for ongoing projects, you pay a higher rate and for delivered projects, you negotiate a maintenance contract with a ...


1

As stacey points out in the comment, it depends on how he was paid during the project. If you did agree to a fixed sum, it is very unusual to charge extra for bugfixes. However, if you paid him hourly, it would be perfectly normal to charge you for every hour he spent working on the project.


1

I'm going to assume you either were a partner, or your bought the old business, correct? Is the old owner around and able to help you out with this part? I only ask, because it seems like that is the only thing you don't want to deal with. Do I blame you? Absolutely not! I just had a meeting yesterday with an old manager of mine who wants to keep hosting ...


1

I would simply list these hours and charge them, as they belong to the scope of the project.


1

If you were a carpenter and your client wanted you to build unique chair which to your understanding would not be required by any other client. Would you charge him for the new tools you require to build his chair only? It is often difficult when you do not have an absolute relation where you could say an apple cost x $ so should the other apple. In ...


1

When working on projects that will require a lot of revisions, I sometimes charge a piece rate (based on the time I estimate it will take) and send an explicit email that outlines the number of revisions/research/etc. that the price includes. Once the client has agreed to a clear list of items, it makes it easier to negotiate again if they want more work to ...


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