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OK. Your client doesn't want to sign a licensing agreement. Here's how to look at this: If the work has not already been performed, and you do the work, it's technically a work-for-hire, and the client would own the code, and there would be no need for a licensing agreement. If the work has already been performed prior to any specific agreement, then you ...


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Although I don't deal much with framework licensing, I'm going to assume it's similar to regular Software licensing - Either with verification of an email showing it's been purchased, or an actual keycode to enter in. When a client needs software (i.e. Windows Server, or Windows licenses for their personal computers), I do not buy them with my own money. I ...


2

Depending on their area of business, for example medicine, it might be neccessary for them to provide the steps taken to get results too. If they weren't sure about your expertise it might have been a smart move to first let you produce results and only then the scripts if they work. When making a price for the scripts, you need to consider two facts: How ...


2

Negotiate, and give the client what they need Unless they are taking other business from you, give them the scripts and offer to walk through the code, assuming you are being compensated for your time and the value you add. Agreeing initially for just the results and not the code allows them to pay a cheaper price in the event that your work was done poorly ...


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I'm not aware of any boilerplate off the top of my head (I'm sure it's out there) but here are some basics to consider based on my experience: even when you (contractor), the client and the (expected) userbase are all located in the US, it's still possible some users outside the US could buy it/download it, e.g. Canada? EU? Japan? EULAs often define the ...


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This is Liz from the Sales Support team at Balsamiq. You’re more than welcome to use our free trial at your pace, and to your convenience. There aren’t any strings attached regarding the wireframes you create during the trial period. They are yours and you can use them commercially if you wish. Nothing stops you from starting a new trial on a new computer. ...


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Regardless of what services you provide to your clients, you should invest in Professional Liability Insurance and General Liability Insurance, or their equivalents. Will I be held responsible? You might very well be held responsible. It is your code after all. What if there is a lot of money involved? should I pay for the damages? You might very ...


1

Although you've agreed to fix bugs or other defects, that doesn't necessarily make you liable for the damage caused by those defects. The Mozilla Public License, which you're using for your code, includes terms to help protect the code's contributors and distributors against liability: * 7. Limitation of Liability ...


1

If the client purchased the license, it is perfectly fine for you to include the product as part of your development for this client. You should not use the product for any other clients in the future however. Imagine you are a home builder. You get hired to build a home. Your client goes out and purchases all the (correct) lumber for the build, gives it ...


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If you are contracted to develop an app, your contract should state who gets ownership of the result. The norm is that your client gets full rights, so if anyone wants to use this app afterwards, they´d have to license it with them. Of course you are free to make other deals like shared revenue, or you keep the rights and just grant them (one) license. You ...


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I don't know about Balsamiq but from my experience most of the softwares I've seen so far with free/trial version didn't allow commercial use. If it's allowed then as long as it won't be a problem for the client I don't see why you couldn't with different trials.


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Does anyone have any tips on approaching the licensing issue with Company B? My work with Company A is still important to me so I do not want to rock the boat too hard, I just want to make sure I am compensated for the reuse of my licensed code. Ask yourself how long it would take a developer with your level of experience/ability to duplicate what you ...


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Not your problem! The software is not being used for your benefit, but to the client's benefit instead. You can make the client aware, but you can't force the client to go out and purchase licenses. As long as you can point to the fact that the client has been informed, let it go. You didn't initiate it -- you're the repairman!


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