10

Ultimately it is your call, but it has been my experience that you largely get what you pay for and if your rates are reasonable for the work you do, then stick to them if you can afford to. That said, be sure you can justify why you ask for what you ask and be ready to explain what they get with you that they don't get with those groups that are under-...


9

If you were invited to bid on it that may have been for a reason. This may sound bad, but I find 'foreign' market developers to be very straight forward in how they work. And not in a good way. If you ask for XYZ, you only get XYZ. The problem is XYZ may not be what the client needs. As a qualified and higher paid developer I may suggest a different path to ...


8

Are you in desperate need of a new contract? Is this a project you personally really want to do? (super interesting, possibility to learn new tech, includes traveling to exotic places, ...) If the answer to either one is yes, go ahead and offer with a discounted rate. I'd make sure the client knows the actual rate ("My usual rate is 130, but due to my ...


6

I'm going to go with my favorite accounting answer on this one, "it depends". The direct answer to your questions is that for international developers I've heard them charging anywhere between between $12 to $55 per hour. The more roundabout answer is it depends on the client. Unless you are working through a third party you have the opportunity to conduct ...


5

Your hourly rate would totally depend on your own skills. If your client is a technical guy, it will take him, say, one hour of Skype calling to understand how good you are. I run a startup web development company. My hourly rates as per my skills and expertise (for all clients, irrespective of the geographic location) are somewhat like: PHP - $12 - $18 ...


4

I had looked into what you are asking; I had talked to some developers and found that the average rate they are charging internationally is approx. 25-30 USD/hr. You can use the same as it is ideally an international project. On the other hand, it would be better if you approximated what the amount of work required is, how much time it will take and how ...


4

Since tax and trade agreements differ widely between different countries, the only thing we can address directly is your example - USA and India. The United States charges a 30% flat tax rate for all foreign entities receiving income from a US entity. This rate may be lower if the foreign country has a tax treaty with the United States, which India does (10-...


3

Whether dealing with local or overseas clients, you ideally want them to take a stake in the project before starting (otherwise it can be easy for them to walk away for whatever reason). I achieve this on most projects by asking for 50% of my fee up front. Using this method, you'll soon find out if you are dealing with a scammer as anyone who is serious ...


3

In general, my answer is no. However, there may be cases where you want to offer a discount in order to expand into new markets. For example, if you do freelance work on an open source project, you may decide to offer a discount on initial development work in a new country, to help you become more familiar with the local needs, etc. The idea here is to ...


3

Working for yourself always is more risky than it is to have a stable job working for someone else. The business owner always absorbs the risk of the company. The worker simply gets his due. The big risk is that of income instability, and this is something every self-employed individual faces all the time. This is one reason we have to charge more than ...


3

Skype It doesn't matter if you can't have personal meetings with them, clients love to be able to do Skype meetings if you don't mind using it. You simply need to make it very clear that you're opened to chat with them about their projects. If you don't like being on video mode, they're usually alright with a voice chat as well. Currency Value There is ...


3

Probably the best thing would be to negotiate a rate in Euros. As far as their accounting is concerned, it wouldn't be much different from using a local freelancer. They can send you a check in Euros and you can have it deposited to a US bank, although you'll have a poor exchange rate and some risk from currency fluctuations. I've never worked with a French ...


3

Not sure if I understood you correctly, but I've heard good things about the the Estonian e-residency in regards to e-businesses and banks.


2

As long as you can produce invoices for every job you are taking money in for, you should be golden. It's definitely nice to have everything in one system, right? What I would do (I don't use Freelance sites) is create an invoice in their site for the client, using their tools, just for those clients. Once they are done, export the invoice (showing it's ...


2

The important is that you declare your revenues in the country you're operating the business. And as the url below suggests, you might also need to declare this UK bank account to the IRS. So yes, you can invoice your client in Pound Sterling and have it deposit in the UK bank account. That's a good solution if you actually have a need for the Pound Sterling ...


2

I eventually had to talk to an accountant. He told me that regardless of method of payment, my US LLC does not have to withhold taxes or report the payment as payments to contractors (1099/1042(S)) to the IRS; it is simply a business expense. He said this gets more complicated if the recipient is working in the US (regardless of nationality), but that is ...


2

I would like to supplement the existing answers. The services you offer have a business value. For example, if your work may double their sales revenue but it only takes you 20 hours to do the work, you may want to charge more than 6000 rupees. You can make a proposal that sells these results rather than focusing solely on hourly rate. This is the ...


2

The closest thing I know is a friend of mine who is from Southern Europe who founded a company in Chile or Peru I think. After 1 or 2 years of good business, he got their citizenship. He also told me that he's very satisfied with their tax policy, they returned him a lot of money in the end of a year. Maybe you try to investigate a solution to establish a ...


2

You live in USA and your costs are in american dollars. While 30% is not a very big difference, the hourly rates in many countries are many times lower then yours. It's a fact that is good known to each existing company. If the company was expecting the local rates, they would not contact the freelancer from the country that is considered expensive. They ...


1

With 99,9% of probability is about phishing or malware. They even copy existing templates of real requests from real companies, they attach a zip or pdf with malware then you get some virus or cryptolocker... then you are blackmailed and in trouble with your computers... just ignore them!


1

I would strongly suggest that you see this as an opportunity to start your own organization. You can base it off the many models that are available but you would make it free to join at first. Once you have a few members you can start listing recommended services, such as the 'perks' you mention, from a good dedicated supplier that you could potentially ...


1

None of the perks you mention are actually free; they're all paid for in some way. To me, part of being a freelancer is having the right and obligation to construct the package of perks you want for yourself. Personally, I choose to attend 3-4 conferences a year. Regarding the networking, (at least in Denmark) one could work out of a shared office instead ...


1

I have worked with clients all over the world - and as codenoir says, the only important factor in terms of location is to be clear about the jurisdiction the contract falls under. Eg, for England/Wales: This Agreement is governed by the law of England and Wales, and is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales. That also ...


1

I have not followed those suggested links in the comments to your questions yet, but one idea I had was: There must be a community or network of expats from your country in Japan. You cannot do business directly if you do not speak the native language, but you can do work for english speaking residents. So target foreign companies in Japan. Your story is ...


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