10

Having an active LinkedIn profile can be a massive help. You can tag your connections to put them into groups and then send a message to the entire group. There is a limit of 50 recipients, above which LinkedIn won't send the message, so if, like me, you've got bags of recruiters connected to you, or a network of potential clients, you can easily reach them ...


9

Unfortunately there are few marketing techniques that are going to consistently provide a return and don't need upkeep or consistency. I spend about 1/4 of my time marketing myself. This includes an array of things: Applying to speak at conferences (this requires travel costs as they don't always pay your way!) Writing guest articles for industry related ...


5

It's always safer to ask, right? But if you want our opinion, then: Yes, you can use it. Just be professional there as well. Do not give project names or project specifications, but rather only company name and technologies you used while working for them. If you have, however, created a cool thing and want to brag with it, then it's a must to ask your ...


4

No logos. Putting someone's logo on your site without permission can be seen to imply endorsement by that company. You can end up in hot water. If in doubt, get permission.


4

I think the first thing you have to do is to stop thinking of marketing as something you go out and do. Marketing needs to be woven into everything else you do because, as you put it, you only have limited time. This means you need to think about various activities you do as potentials for networking and marketing, and thus dual-purpose as many activities ...


3

IANAL, so I cannot give you advice. I can only tell you how I would use a trademark on a web page of my own design. First, I referred to Wikipedia and found a description of Nominative Use in a trademark context. I take it to mean that I can use a client's trademark only enough to identify them in a statement, such as, "I taught AIX classes for IBM as a ...


2

Use the company name your considering, its an effective strategy to determine if you like the new brand in action. Provided that the service or product is satisfactory, customer base ought to hold steady. If the test brand is not going to work out it's essential to promote the finalized brand like crazy to make sure clients are crystal clear about the ...


2

I do this, and for free as well. I have 4 domains that I'm responsible for, 2 that are my own personal, and 2 that other organizations pay for after I bill them. I have an email at each. It's great to have one main inbox for your work related stuff, and only you can pick which domain to put it all through. On all the others, point the MX records at a free ...


2

In the litigious environment we operate in today I would be very careful to use a logo of a firm on your website. I agree with Brian K Haney's discussion with nominative use above. Going forward, as you work with clients, you may want to ask them if you can use their logo (or likeness) in promotional materials on your website. Then you will know upfront. ...


1

Altering branding is generally handled in one of three ways... "Formerly XXXXXXX" Completely unrelated branding to appear as a new company "A subsidiary of XXXXX" Given the clarifying comment, it's imperative to consider how you want to move forward and what you want your business to look like 1, 3, 5, + years down the road. If the ...


1

When doing a project or any work for a company, ask if you can use them as a reference. That's a great time to get permission. You can even add it as a part of a document they write off on when the job is complete. It basically just says you can use the logo. I've gone both routes of asking and not asking and haven't had an issue with any. When asking, I'...


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