9

Speaking just in IT, certifications can mean the world, or nothing... In my case, they mean nothing. I get my jobs based on my experience and ability to adapt. If you are translating, certificates just mean you can pass a test. If you are able to speak it fluently, that would most likely be enough. When applying to the projects, I'd probably recommend ...


4

Put yourself in their shoes. What kinds of companies need this service? (What kinds of companies do you want to do work for?) I don't know, but I'm guessing the answer might be: exporters imports banks providing letters of credit foreign adoption agencies others??? A large multi-national company may already have a presence in that country, and thus perhaps ...


3

Is might be problematic that you initially agreed to not receive actual money - but that will have to change now. The client also seems to understand this - as I read it. Pricing is always difficult - but you seem to have a good case for charging more than the former editors - and being able to perform at a higher level, you should not be bound by their ...


2

I have a yearly software bill that I must pay to work. That fee gets counted as overhead when factoring project costs. These "books" would seemingly equate to similar "tools" required to complete your projects. This is how business is done. If you need "tools" to complete you work, whatever they may be - books, pencils, software, etc. - then those tools ...


2

The qualifications are quite obvious: very good knowledge of the language in the particular domain. Some companies may require formal proof in form of some renown exam, some need references, portfolio, some others may just give you a job for trial. But some things, like official documents, VAT invoices etc. must be translated by licensed translator (for ...


2

My brother is a translator freelancer as well. Although he finished his college and is graduated professor of English and French, no one has ever asked him about his diploma. Somehow, people think it's natural that you are graduated if you're doing translation. Of course, he scanned his diploma and is ready to show it on request. What I would do in your ...


2

I think this can be generalized to "How to reach underserved markets?" In general the primary difficulties is that there are not well established paths for getting customers, and so that it is difficult to see where to start. It is also worth noting for non-linguistically inclined readers that Slavic languages in general are very close to eachother which ...


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