17

Probably, everyone who's in freelance/outsourcing business have had these problems. I'm not thinking my answer will contain an exhaustive list of your possible mistakes, but here are several ones that caught my eye when reading the question. Prepend each item with "possibly", "IMHO", "YMMV", etc. Too high quality standards. It well may be that you are ...


12

While not programming or development related, I have subcontracted and been a subcontractor. When hiring, I have found it very necessary to remain in constant contact with the subcontractor. Not incessantly so, but regularly. My favorite phrase is "Okay, I'll check back in X days to see where we're at." And I do that repeatedly regardless of where the ...


10

As someone who makes a living building teams of contractors to handle projects for my clients, I can say positively that communication, accurate expectations, and finding people who will work well together are crucial elements to a successful project. 10x that if your contractors are remote. You mentioned that at one time you had 20 contractors working for ...


9

I am going to speak as the outsourced freelancer, specifically with IT projects (not necessarily programming). When I am given assignments, we would usually get treated like idiots, meaning that there is documentation up the ying-yang, including pictures and exact keys to press (i.e. Type ipconfig /all and press enter to execute the command). There was a ...


7

I hate to say it but I don't think you should hire her at all. If you hire her it seems you have only 2 options: Talk to her about her husband and your concerns. By the sounds of it the husband would not take to this kindly. I don't think he would gracefully back down and imagine he would keep causing problems in your work. You also don't want to be ...


6

You quote the hiring company exactly like a customer, be it fixed price or hourly fee, and you bill them. It may be the case that the hiring company takes a commission, don't be worried (but don't lower your prices for this reason). You absolutely establish a contract with this firm. You can make it longer term than for the initial project if you want, but ...


6

The terms do seem to be used interchangeably... However, I would suggest that there is a semantic difference: outsourcing is when your existing staff are transferred to a third party supplier, and are then contracted back-in subcontracting is when work (supply of goods or services) is put out to tender without affecting any existing staff Having Googled, ...


6

I've run into exactly the same problem. I left a web design firm where I was an account exec, went out on my own, built teams and won some large scale contracts, and made great money with some great people. (I took a 3yr hiatus to windsurf - reflected on what I wanted to do, and realized, I love coding - I want to stick with that - so I'm longer trying to ...


6

Well from what I can see, you are a good photographer and you have more work than you can handle. So this is a good position for expansion. The same happened to me in the programming field. Declining a long-term client is never a good idea. Especially if a client is paying you your price and if he's a good client. So bringing another man to a team is a way ...


5

To me, this just sounds like a referral business. Depending how you lay your contract and Scope of Work out would determine if I would recommend this if you like working. I understand it's everyone's dream to just let other people work for you, making you money. This model would be great if you had multiple deals going on at a time, with multiple "...


5

Two things come to mind. You're not hiring the right people. Or You need to let go a little, which is a vital part of being a good manager. In general I'd say to trust your instincts, but your high turnover leads me to wonder if you don't understand that delegation means letting go to a certain extent. Maybe their work is not what you would do, but it ...


5

I have joined Outsource since posting my previous answer, and I would say it's about as "scammy" as eLance - there are things I really don't like about Outsource you can't see anyone else's bids buyers/clients don't have profiles like service providers, so you can't see how many jobs they've posted vs how many they've actually closed on - and this is a ...


4

You do not state your location, so that makes things a little bit difficult... Common sense would suggest that (unless regulated within law) you have no legal obligation to pay for someone else's service - and if a customer is declining to pay, then you have no obligation to continue to provide it. Regarding the payment aspects, certainly here in the UK, I ...


4

I'm not a lawyer!! I'll state that again, I am not a lawyer. However, I would think the initial payment of the services would show intent to support the organization and therefore not allow you to claim ownership at this point. You've already established you'd pay for services benefiting the organization. You can no longer wish to pay for the services. ...


4

In most situations, the two are very different... Doctors in General Practice are usually self-employed or in small partnerships (no political discussion of recent NHS changes, please) and when one is absent, the practice is unlikely to be able to fill the void themselves. On the other hand, ICT companies usually have enough staff to be able to cover (...


4

I have been working in the IT sector since the last few years; actually started a venture back in 2000 and have it going good now. Initially i used to get projects as the third party where someone from the US or some other country got the job from his client and he/she used to outsource the job to us. I felt it many times that my client was not very happy ...


4

I've been a freelancer on Outsource.com for a few months and have actually had some success. I've been hired twice so far. It's a different setup from other sites... you pay a subscription fee to get quotes and message clients, but there aren't any service fees so it's up to you to do a good job marketing yourself. Since they are new, there aren't swarms ...


4

Why would it be illegal? It seems you are buying a service (that you cannot provide) from your partner. Nothing wrong with that. Whether your company structure is optimal, is another matter that very much depends on your jurisdiction. Addendum: Assuming self-employment is somewhat comparable between the UK and Denmark, the main concern for the (tax) ...


4

This is always tricky. You can see Metis experience. In cases like this my first point of contact is the person who contracted me. I inform him that I want to use the project in my portfolio and if he is OK with it. In half cases I get OK, in other half I do not get the green light. The reason for this is that many agencies or individuals subcontract their ...


3

I have not used Outsource.com, either, but I don't care for their blanket statement regarding IP rights assignments. I prefer to negotiate these rights separately myself. For graphic design/illustration/visual design work, standard industry practice is that the freelance artist retains the rights and grants a license of some kind to the client, depending on ...


3

This is effectively how an agency works. They charge an external rate to their clients, which translates into a (usually different) internal rate depending upon the salary/rate being paid to the individual(s) performing the service. You are perfectly within your rights to charge a set fee to your clients and then subcontract certain elements to third ...


3

Well there are 2 scenarios that I am aware of. Large companies charge support A LOT meaning that 1 annual contract allow them to cover yearly costs of the project. But those are large companies. I personally charge my regular work hours + 50%. For example, a client and myself reach a retainer agreement where I promise that I will reserve X work hours ...


3

15 years as an independent consultant (IT), and 99% of the time I bill hourly. I hate to go against your 'no hourly' constraint, but if it's a short wireframe project with no scope but expected duration of 3 weeks, aren't you trying to determine 'how much of my time will it take to complete the wireframe deliverables within the timeline'? Of course, ...


3

The two terms mean the same thing from a business perspective. It has nothing to do with size. Entire departments for call centers, accounting, order fulfillment consisting of hundreds of employees can be contracted out to professionals on a long term recurring basis. The outsourcing is governed by a contract stipulating the services expected and the ...


3

As Andrew said, both terms have the same meaning, more or less. But in my own experience, the clients approached to me with both terms and each time each of them was used in a similar manner. This made me think that there is a spoken meaning adopted among clients hiring freelancers. Outsourcing - usually smaller projects. Another team is hired and the ...


3

Pass on them. Realize any bond the wife has will be much stronger for her husband than any client, including you. If he's involved now in an undesired fashion, he will be later as well. Even after you speak with her. After all it's her husband, she lives with him, you're just some random client. She won't keep the work private. She will discuss issue with ...


3

DO NOT HIRE THEM This looks like business and personal got mixed. The husband lied, he's out. The wife leaked information to her husband, she's out. They are out because the core foundation of business is trust.


3

Quick question for you, does the client care how it's done, or that it gets done? Clients typically hire you for your skill, and for results, without caring how you do it. I have brought in sub-contractors for jobs, and still just changed my regular rate. My rate will cover a contractor or two, if I need some things done that I either don't have time for, ...


3

You have the ability to get into more opportunities when your business is registered as a corp or LLC, because it removes a threat of liability (for paying statutory employees under-the-table) for the customer. However, nobody's going to beat a path to your door other than the recruiters. If your credentials are solid and in a "hot" field, your phone will ...


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