13

I would advise following approach: Define the scope of the work (which means "what will be delivered"). With an ongoing project like this you probably won't be able to do this retroactively (because you definitely do not want to damage your good relationship with the client). But, you can do it for future requests. I.e. "<module>, that will have ...


10

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


7

There are plenty of people that have 'grand visions' and limited resources. They'll get going on something and then realize either that they can't afford to use it the way they intended, it's going to take longer to do then they expected, or that their understanding of what they needed was incomplete and they really need something else. This goes on all ...


6

It seems to me that you are really still thinking like an employee. If you are a freelancer and have a contract detailing what you've been hired to do, then anything not included in that contract is A) open for discussion/rejection by you and B) due additional compensation. Unless your contract states something like "anything we give you, you complete" In ...


6

For large projects I always do monthly billings to the client plus a prepayment before starting the project to pay initial costs. It is perfectly OK to do like that, it is a mutual responsibility. If you ask a single payment only at the end you will give a "weapon" that will make the client blackmail you if you don't do all his changes and requests, just ...


5

Personally, when I have a contractual agreement with a company, signed from the legal representative of the whole company as a single entity, I assume that every request coming from it is regulated in the contract. So for every call and request that comes from any company office I assume that the caller asked to the boss or the supervisor for permission ...


4

You're a victim of scope creep. It's not uncommon, it happens to many, including yours truly. Possibly the ideal way to head it off before it happens is to create a mutually-agreed upon list of features for the current project or iteration, and set it in stone. Add requests for additional features or changes to a list and revisit that at a later point. ...


4

I once had a client that I did a great deal of smaller items for. I primarily dealt with 2 or 3 individuals at the company and they were organized and thorough in their requests. As the their company grew, more people were hired on and then delegated to do various tasks. It was clear to me that at some point someone said "Contact this guy.. he handles that ...


4

I know it's pretty much standard to set a limit to the number of revisions a client can have.. however..... I'm rare... I don't place a limitation on changes/iterations on most of the work I do. I allow my clients to not be concerned that "uh-oh, we've already made 3 changes. Now we have to pay for more or deal with a piece we don't like." My client love ...


4

In the design work working on a fixed-price basis, always, always, always set how many iterations are included in the price. it could be 3 or 5 or 55 as long as the client is aware of it. Along with this rule, you should advise him that he should send changes in a bunch instead one by one so that he does not use all iterations in vain. With this advise, you ...


3

I always include every discount on any invoice. Even if the discount amounts to 100%. Why? Well... The client see the added value they are receiving. If I should have trouble collecting the amount due, there's a written record of the discount provided. And that discount can be rescinded if payment is not made. So if collections becomes necessary, I can go ...


3

The answer to your question as stated is "No". Increase in scope before work has started is good, since that usually means more pay. It also means that you don't have to go back and fix, undo, or change things in the project in order to accommodate the new items. I think the primary issue here is in your statement: But, I agreed to the increased scope, ...


3

Yes and no. In medium and larger projects, this means that the client did not seriously plan the project. If they had to change project specs with each "change of mind", then they would not change it so often. Yet again, the client is not an expert in that area. He may find a "cool and simple solution" which will cost 50 work hours. You as a contractor ...


3

I would get a scope of some form in writing that both parties can agree to, even just a bulleted list of what a feature or job will contain. Give a limited flexibility on changing features within that list but anything new that isn't in the list is a new job and would require a new quote. I would always be wary of even great clients that do this too much ...


2

It seems that you need to formalize your change-request process a bit better. Yes, allow the client to make changes along the way. But if you are charging 50% up front for the initial project, generate an estimate on the change requests also and charge 50% on the change request before starting any work. You have to be fair to yourself. If a client ...


2

It shouldn't be free and in fact, it's probably the client who encouraged the employees to contact you. And your expertise also has a value. Most companies that offer a maintenance service will charge for this and it can be used however the client wants it; in this case, to train his employees. You can tell the client upfront about the billable ...


2

To answer your question, knowing the full scope of the project upfront is the ideal scene. Knowing the full intentions of the project allow you to better manage the project with time, costs, and updates. I have been working on a project now steadily for 14 months with the first edition going live within 2 months of the project. The scope of the project has ...


2

This depends how you invoice. If I let myself be persuaded in giving a fixed quote, I don´t even show any hour to the client. He just gets function X: Price $ 1,000 (Internally I calculate my hourly rate and add a risk-margin X to it) If I am paid by the hour an have to give an estimate, I make sure I communicate this as estimate and deliver a time-sheet ...


2

It seems you have done everything expected from an honest Freelancer. If your client has been informed of the limitations regarding this project and still ignores your professional advice you can either... Try harder to comply by prioritizing the project and, as you mentioned, at least complete the original scope as directed from the beginning, then ...


1

I have grappled with this problem as well. If this is a client that you will get additional work from, even perhaps of the same parameters as the first job, you almost have to make them aware of those extra hours, even if you don’t charge them this time ... for the simple reason you don’t want to have to continually give the client those extra hours free of ...


1

I know for a fact that this upcoming project, will not be completed on time due to the endless change requests. Sometimes deliverables that were confirmed as done were often revisited for more changes. In cases like these, there are three issues at play: 1) Being paid for the original contracted works. 2) stopping change requests from affecting 1) 3) ...


1

I would go beyond a monthly fee and bill it hourly, that is the only way to be happy when working with clients who can't stop pestering you with changes. Another alternative is to break things down into milestones and be paid for each milestone. Never put all of a multi-month project into a single lump-sum payment or a half up-front, half on-delivery split.


1

I'd firstly say: don't do cheap underpriced projects! Now, you conduct seems OK. I would do the same. You agreed on one things, they started adding new features without wanting to compensate extra work, so it's smart you froze the work. Don't abandon the client, just keep asking him will you complete the project or not. Once he pays one milestone, go to ...


1

I would say that No, increasing the scope of work, by itself, is not a warning sign. In your specific situation, the part at the beginning: She had a pretty grand vision of what she wanted, but I managed to get her to agree to a limited scope for a first iteration. is a much bigger warning sign to me. There are plenty of clients who don't understand ...


1

Your contract with the client should include a detailed entry of the scope of what will be done. within your contract should be a clause for scope creep. Often it should state that should a client go well outside of what was agreed, he or she must renegotiate a new contract in addition to paying a kill fee for the first unfinished project. There's a great ...


1

There are a couple of approaches you can take here. One is to make sure that you've built some contingency into the price that you agree with the client, on the assumption that they will inevitably want to make changes and enhancements once the site has started to take shape. That's an inevitable part of building a website unfortunately. Even if you go down ...


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