6

The simple answer is YOU are free to do what you want. I work with a group of freelancers in Toronto and we generally refer business to each other without asking for anything back - when I refer a client to another freelancer, either they are a 'better fit for the job,' or I'm just too busy at the time - but I always make sure I'm putting the prospective ...


5

I wouldn't be so affirmative about "you didn't assume liability" on the grounds that nobody signed a contract. There has been pre-contractual discussions and work was performed based on these discussions, under mutual agreement, so technically speaking the commercial agreement was established, and "by default" rules will hold. Anyway, being sued for such a ...


4

1. Could a Testimonial be sufficient? It's probably reasonable to ask for testimonials from clients on behalf of your current employer and this might be sufficient especially where testimonials mention you by name. If you have a good relationship with your clients, or have done some work you are especially proud of, you could ask for this specifically. ...


3

Sounds more like a kickback than a "finder's fee" -- Finders fees are generally one-time fees. Kickbacks are ethically questionable, but done all the time. If you are raising your fees 20% to cover these costs and BP isn't doing anything, then it's a very fine line ethically. If the client were to discover you're charging 20% more just to pay BP 20%... ...


2

10%??? I hope you're not walking around dressed up in a cape, stacked heels, bell bottoms and oversized gaudy hat, because it seems you're trying to pimp your colleague! To sub it out is one thing -- YOU have to do the work to analyze the requirements, make sure the client is qualified to pay the bills, and front money to your subs even if the end-customer ...


2

In my experience (IT consulting, not developing) referral fees are common practice. It all depends on the context of course, but from what I've seen this usually happens when an experienced freelancer with lots of work decides to tell his client "I can't do the project, but I know someone who can, he is good". It's not so much, "give some, get some". ...


1

In the past, I've tried to maintain a passive search for new opportunities. That way, when I find one that I may be interested in, I can inform my current employer/client that, at the moment, I'm just keeping my options open. It sounds like that's basically what you're doing, anyway. You're not definitively leaving. Many professionals will tell you that ...


1

I have to disagree with @codenoire. I always charge such fee. I mean if 90% is not enough for your "friend" for the job that came out of nowhere without him having to negotiate terms, price, etc...and he still complaints! If someone does that to me I would never offer him anything ever again. The same happens with me. When I am offered to do some job for ...


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