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The key to keeping the ball rolling when it comes to landing a contract is communication. At this point, you've submitted a proposal, and it sounds like you've either contacted a member of that organization directly, or a member of that organization contacted you. First, the decision maker may actually be the person you've contacted. Don't assume this is ...


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The shortest I can say is: it depends on the contract :) Some will include research phase into the contract and will not start research before the contract has been signed. Others will do this research before the contract is signed, and then gather this costs later in the process. IMHO I would not do any research longer than 1-2 hours before the ...


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No. A Contract is the terms and conditions you lay down, normally across all projects (it is often a generic document). A Proposal is job specific. It lays out what the project aims to achieve, the features it may have and timescales. The only variation is where the price is located. Some people put this in to the contract, however really it should be ...


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When you're just starting out Freelancing, I would highly recommend freelancing sites like Freelancer.com or Elance.com. I know for a fact that on Freelancer.com, they give you tips on what to do when you start freelancing, and would recommend you the steps you should take when starting a job (before all the contract bits). They also have teams that will ...


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For a back-end developer, I believe your portfolio would be the enterprises and the scale of the projects you worked on. Even though I am a front-end developer, I'm not really focused on integrating websites or designing apps but more on implementing business logic in JS. So every time I have to sell myself, I always talk about the size of the clients, the ...


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Could you showcase how you've been efficient? A customer had a query that ran for over 3 minutes to retrieve the data. After detailing the requirements, I was able to run a query to produce the same results in only 3 seconds, making their systems run 60x more efficiently Would something like that work for you? As a person who appreciates efficiency, it's ...


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Being a client on those services give you a chance to open the project even if you are not sure that you need someone to work on it. So those are the ones that are left hanging because clients are not sure what to do, could not find anyone to match their budget, or simply found contractor via another source and were too lazy to close it. oDesk took a twist ...


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There are a few solutions to this dilemma. 1 - If your platform allows it, you can answer to the client without specifying an amount in your answer. This way, you avoid being discarded on price only and it gives you a chance to prove your skills and communication abilities to the client. 2 - I found that if the client is looking for really low hourly rates,...


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Definitely not. A contract is done by attorneys, whereas a proposal can be sent by a garbage man. Just said. One is legal document which protects your right and your pocket, the other is your estimation of costs put in nice words. Contract goes only in the end! Before you start working! Not at the same time. He does not need to sign the proposal, but you ...


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In addition to jmort253's points above, I think the best approach is to assume that you are talking to a decision maker on every contact but that decisions are made cooperatively. In many companies, these decisions are not made by one person in a vacuum but made cooperatively by groups of people. I have had cases where I got projects after being contacted ...


2

I found nothing bad in this bid. Maybe some stylistic things in English language which made me not understand what you said immediately, but other than that the bid is OK. Now, what you will realize that winning bid does not exist. As simple as this. Sometimes clients want long bid, sometimes short, sometimes they don't even read cause they had bad ...


2

Asking someone to complete unpaid work as a freelancer in the hopes of landing a job isn't going to go down very well. If it's for web design, it would be better to ask for samples of previous work (at least 5) and details on how long it took for each one and the challenges that they faced. You can very quickly see whether they are legitimate or not from ...


2

Dangerous territory here... But I'll bite. If you can guarantee (likely with a lawyer's advice/help) that you developed it on your own time on your own equipment in your own home, you may have a case to keep it to yourself. Did you sign an Employment Agreement that stated the company owns anything you do? Check that out. Next, do you have it hosted ...


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If you have no experience, make sure you are paid by the hour and for your time - not for the result. You should charge an hourly rate that covers all your costs and a profit that allows you to earn more than normal employment in this kind of job. Simple Example (numbers completely made up - find them out for your locality): Say you´d earn $500/week net ...


2

No, don't make that kind of promise. You can promise to take specific actions which might be likely to lengthen the duration of user sessions, such as what is described here, but you can't put a blanket promise in the contract to "double" the length without exposing yourself to legal action. What if it doesn't work? What if external conditions change? ...


2

Proposal writing in response to RFPs can be quite a difficult endeavor. The best way to learn is having a good mentor, who’s an experienced proposal writer. If you know someone has this experience, ask if they will be your mentor. That said, you can learn how to write proposals on your own. I’ve probably written hundreds of proposals as a research ...


1

The Request for Proposal varies in depth and detail, depending on the innovation of the product / service. The RFP is made through a bidding process, where the aim is to receive the product / service at the highest quality with the lowest price. The RFP consists of many section and SOW is one in it. The SOW section should describe in detail what the ...


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This isn't a complete answer, but a properly written RFP will describe exactly how they want the proposal done (sometimes specifying the font type and size, and page count limits). I suggest getting a copy of a government RFP from municipal, state, or federal levels and seeing what sections they require. Commercial RFPs will generally have fewer ...


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If you want to show this to a non technical person build ERM's and UML's that should be enough to show them your knowledge with databases Say some stuff like: "x table works for y module in the app so it's a critical component for operation etc etc" If the person has knowledge then build a repository and upload a lot of basic stored procedures, functions, ...


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Even though the request in itself is pretty clear and quite easily measured, it might be worthwhile examining what the client really wants. If time = money, the request for 'doubling time spent' could actually mean 'double my money'. If so, perhaps the focus should shift to money instead of time. Perhaps there are other ways to monetize? Betters ads? ...


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Would it be safe to assume that any project after a month after it's initial announcement is unlikely to do anything than just sit and stagnate, in a state of limbo (incorrectly flagged as "hiring open" or "selecting candidate"? Yes. I've been using Elance for over a year, and I've observed (from reviewing the history of all jobs that I've bidded on) that ...


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There are multiple approaches to this. 1) You start working at lower hourly rate, then after some time, you talk to the client and tell him that you would like to increase your hourly rate since you've proved yourself. The risk here is that he will refuse it and you will have to finish the project with small rate. This is true if you work via rating ...


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The intake form, as described, or a Skype/phone consultation should do the trick. Face to face is fine, but make that client come to you if the client insists. Phone calls are cheap; fuel, road tolls, and parking costs are not and it's foolish to make these expenditures for a client that might not commit, UNLESS the pay makes it really, really worth it. ...


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OK, so telling them to send specs does not work in your thoughts because you think there are good clients who do not know what the specs are or how to write them. Now, if you are sure that you do not want to meet each of them or they come to your office, why not try to see if a phone call will work. So instead of meeting with them, ask them for their phone ...


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A project bid should basically contain the information needed for the client to determine whether or not to use your services. It can be delivered in different formats, depending on your or your client's preference (such as paper, a PDF, a single-page site, etc.). Chris Travers and Canadian Luke had posted answers on a separate question regarding the ...


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This is as simple as this - find out your hourly price and stick to it! When you get such an offer, analyze the project in detail and calculate how many work hours it will take you to finish it. Then tell your price to your "people". They can add their commission on top of your price. If you want to go deeper, you can calculate your maximum hourly rate (...


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