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8

So much to address here... First off, NO. You don't need a PR person on full-time to help you. You need to deal with your own situation before you bring more people in. Freelancing should make you more money than being a regular full-time employee, punching in and out everyday. What are your rates at? Obviously, too low. Read the other questions on here ...


6

You quote the hiring company exactly like a customer, be it fixed price or hourly fee, and you bill them. It may be the case that the hiring company takes a commission, don't be worried (but don't lower your prices for this reason). You absolutely establish a contract with this firm. You can make it longer term than for the initial project if you want, but ...


4

I haven't got this far, but I do have a "personal" network of professionals I can lean on, and they can lean on me. This was started by me being an employee of a workplace that many of those professionals frequented. After I went on my own, we kept in touch. In my case, we just regularly keep contact, whether it be on Linked In, or popping into their ...


4

It's way to build "fake" reputation by completing your own jobs. That way it looks like one is well seasoned, has been very successful, and has made clients happy on the crowdsource site even though they really haven't. It's also a way for banned/disallowed individuals to use the site through you... making you liable for any actions they take on ...


4

If you have no experience in the show business you can start with a 1 year contract with an agent and see how it goes. Then when you are more experienced you decide how to go on. An agent who is active in that business probably has many contacts, friends and collegues to obtain jobs from more than you have now alone. You can have more chances than being ...


2

Mark, Your state department of labor/employment ought to be able to help you with the regulations and policies. I remember that Texas Employment Commission had sample employee handbooks for employers on its web site, so I did a Google search on that as a search string. https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#...


2

What Canadian Luke said! Plus, I would add: Never give a price or time estimate when speaking with the client. Just like me, you are too weak for this right now! Rather, practice this on family and friends and in the mirror until it feels natural: Pause and give a thoughtful look. Then say "I'm going to have to think this through. Let me get back to ...


2

There's a say: "Verbal agreement is worth as much as the paper it's written on" They already tried to take over your content, are asking for you to open doors to the market and are now asking to know your team. This is a clear take over. During the meeting they will exchange contacts with each one of your teammates and will try to do to them the ...


2

First there's no way to know if you are wrong or right you need to release it to know. So the real problem when developing something like that is that most of the time when it take a long time to make it happen, the partnership gets bored or demotivated to continue and so the project fails. Something that helps with that is what your Classmate says, ...


2

Whether or not you need a partner or coworker depends on the work you do, the work you take on, and your desired business goals. It is completely possible to never have a partner and be successful in many fields. It is by no means ever a "requirement" to have a coworker or partner. If the work you perform has certain expectations which you can not meet ...


1

Short Answer.. It depends Something I discuss with many clients, is the importance of Minimal Viable Product. Ideally your initial release should be at a point where the core features are viably working. That being said, mobile apps can evolve based on user feedback. The upside of releasing early? Getting reactions from testers, information from your ...


1

I generally agree that discounting on request can be a dead end and not desireable. I'm in a different business, but sometimes face the same issues. An approach that I use, and with which I am comfortable is this for hourly work: "Here's my standard hourly rate: x $/h", it applies to corporate and business clients, for single homeowners (who are also in ...


1

To take a quote from a video game player I have spent some time with, HTFU. As bad as that sounds I agree that there is no reason to offer a discount on a service you have spent way too much time and money learning to give it away. I have been recently offered similar advice from another close friend who has seen me doing the exact same thing as you, ...


1

What I'm reading here is that maybe you didn't have the roles within the business defined very well at all. Business partnership is like marriage! You are tied at-the-hip to the good and bad decisions your partner makes. If you're really having a lot of conflict, and you're not too vested in the arrangement, a last resort is to sell your interest in the ...


1

I've dealt with someone like this before, but it was a full time job not a freelancer. So take what you can from our advice here: Make them quantify why a certain technology/framework is bad for the project, not just them as a developer. As for the cost/quoting problem, go to the boss and talk with them about it privately. If you are in a discussion as a ...


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