17

Probably, everyone who's in freelance/outsourcing business have had these problems. I'm not thinking my answer will contain an exhaustive list of your possible mistakes, but here are several ones that caught my eye when reading the question. Prepend each item with "possibly", "IMHO", "YMMV", etc. Too high quality standards. It well may be that you are ...


12

As I can see, you charged them 8 pounds per hour, which is $13 per hour. This is a very good price and you definitely did not overcharge them. Your other mistake is that you investigated the price of work in the UK. You cannot do that. If they wanted a UK developer, they would have taken one. You have to charge them your hourly price, which is enough to ...


12

While not programming or development related, I have subcontracted and been a subcontractor. When hiring, I have found it very necessary to remain in constant contact with the subcontractor. Not incessantly so, but regularly. My favorite phrase is "Okay, I'll check back in X days to see where we're at." And I do that repeatedly regardless of where the ...


10

As someone who makes a living building teams of contractors to handle projects for my clients, I can say positively that communication, accurate expectations, and finding people who will work well together are crucial elements to a successful project. 10x that if your contractors are remote. You mentioned that at one time you had 20 contractors working for ...


9

I am going to speak as the outsourced freelancer, specifically with IT projects (not necessarily programming). When I am given assignments, we would usually get treated like idiots, meaning that there is documentation up the ying-yang, including pictures and exact keys to press (i.e. Type ipconfig /all and press enter to execute the command). There was a ...


7

I would say yes. bringing more people on to a project always creates more work, and I don't see any reason you shouldn't bill for that work. EDIT: from Peter's comment below, and to expand on this thought a bit more. I'm saying this assuming that since you are outsourcing, you are interfacing with the client directly. And by that mean handling all ...


6

The terms do seem to be used interchangeably... However, I would suggest that there is a semantic difference: outsourcing is when your existing staff are transferred to a third party supplier, and are then contracted back-in subcontracting is when work (supply of goods or services) is put out to tender without affecting any existing staff Having Googled, ...


6

I've run into exactly the same problem. I left a web design firm where I was an account exec, went out on my own, built teams and won some large scale contracts, and made great money with some great people. (I took a 3yr hiatus to windsurf - reflected on what I wanted to do, and realized, I love coding - I want to stick with that - so I'm longer trying to ...


5

To me, this just sounds like a referral business. Depending how you lay your contract and Scope of Work out would determine if I would recommend this if you like working. I understand it's everyone's dream to just let other people work for you, making you money. This model would be great if you had multiple deals going on at a time, with multiple "...


5

Two things come to mind. You're not hiring the right people. Or You need to let go a little, which is a vital part of being a good manager. In general I'd say to trust your instincts, but your high turnover leads me to wonder if you don't understand that delegation means letting go to a certain extent. Maybe their work is not what you would do, but it ...


5

While you certainly don't need someone with the skillset of a developer or designer, you do need someone who understands the processes thoroughly. There's nothing more annoying to an educated client than dealing with an uneducated company representative. So, skills - probably no. But, understanding - definitely yes. If that means you need to train someone, ...


5

I have joined Outsource since posting my previous answer, and I would say it's about as "scammy" as eLance - there are things I really don't like about Outsource you can't see anyone else's bids buyers/clients don't have profiles like service providers, so you can't see how many jobs they've posted vs how many they've actually closed on - and this is a ...


5

A degree is only required when laws require it. Such as.... (in the United States) A PhD is mandatory to be a doctor. Passing the Bar is mandatory to be an attorney, etc. Unless laws require a profession to be licensed or have educational minimums, then no you do not need to have a degree to freelance. Having a degree will almost always put you above job ...


4

The amount you charge is somewhat irrelevant. It does not even come remotely close to anything I'd ever consider as "over" charging. If I wanted to work for $13/hr I'd have full time job, which would still pay better than that. All clients want better/cheaper pricing. All of them. It's not up to the client to dictate your pricing, it's up to you. But that's ...


4

The rate seems pretty fair to me but should not matter assuming you have an agreement from the client to pay an amount for a product or service that you have delivered. One tactic you might like to try is to threaten to place the debt with a debt collection agency in the UK if it is not paid within a certain amount of time. A UK debt collection agency will ...


4

You can get work on different forums which deal with web development. All of them will have job sections where people look for programmers there, rather than on freelancing sites. But you need to have reputation there, too. Big companies do not go to forums. Big companies do not go to freelancing sites. Big companies will very very rarely hire a freelancer;...


4

I have been working in the IT sector since the last few years; actually started a venture back in 2000 and have it going good now. Initially i used to get projects as the third party where someone from the US or some other country got the job from his client and he/she used to outsource the job to us. I felt it many times that my client was not very happy ...


4

This all depends on your relations with the client and your own professional conduct. Many contractors will simply take and pile up jobs and subcontract them without informing clients or taking care about quality of such product. Those people may have elevated progress of their business, but in long term, they will fail. I personally tell my clients if I ...


4

I've been a freelancer on Outsource.com for a few months and have actually had some success. I've been hired twice so far. It's a different setup from other sites... you pay a subscription fee to get quotes and message clients, but there aren't any service fees so it's up to you to do a good job marketing yourself. Since they are new, there aren't swarms ...


4

Is it a good idea? Yes. Are there cons in working directly? Yes. When you work over freelancer websites, you can see what other clients said about the contractor, the money you load is guaranteed e.g. you can complain and get your money back if a contractor is not doing the job. Even contractors are more serious as they know that you can ruin their rating ...


4

"Thank you for your work so far. However as I stated multiple times, I need a minimum of 1 article every 2 business days. Since you are unable to deliver this I am cancelling the project effective immediately." See https://www.freelancer.com/support/Project/how-to-cancel-a-project Hire some others to do the work you need. Your reputation is at stake so it'...


3

Lucky for you, there's no shortage of fashion bloggers on the web. However, their writing styles, reliability, and fees will vary drastically. More often than not, you're going to get what you pay for. Here are the 4 tiers of writers out there, how you might find them, and what a pay structure could look like if you hire them. Fashion Bloggers with an ...


3

I freelance full time and I avoid all crowd sourcing sites like the plague. They are bad for business here. Working on "spec" is just bad practice for freelancers. As to impact, it has none here. My clients are not and never will be the clients who settle for crowd sourcing services. There is a market for crowd sourcing, but it's just not the same market ...


3

The two terms mean the same thing from a business perspective. It has nothing to do with size. Entire departments for call centers, accounting, order fulfillment consisting of hundreds of employees can be contracted out to professionals on a long term recurring basis. The outsourcing is governed by a contract stipulating the services expected and the ...


3

As Andrew said, both terms have the same meaning, more or less. But in my own experience, the clients approached to me with both terms and each time each of them was used in a similar manner. This made me think that there is a spoken meaning adopted among clients hiring freelancers. Outsourcing - usually smaller projects. Another team is hired and the ...


3

The principal behind freelance workers is that they do not want to be managed by others and have chosen a career path which allows them to manage themselves. If you hire a freelance writer, it is not your position to manage them as an employee. You can set expectations as to quality and guidelines for delivery time/method(s). However, beyond that the "...


3

I think the response is: You can't. This is an issue even the biggest corporations have difficulty with. From what I know, what makes it hard to protect your IP in foreign country is: 1) The value of your work 2) The capacity to sue if there is any infringement 3) The relationship of your country and the country where the infringement is done Why I say ...


3

I have not used Outsource.com, either, but I don't care for their blanket statement regarding IP rights assignments. I prefer to negotiate these rights separately myself. For graphic design/illustration/visual design work, standard industry practice is that the freelance artist retains the rights and grants a license of some kind to the client, depending on ...


3

If the money you're making from your current clients will support you financially, and you're confident that they'll continue to consistently provide you with work, then it's reasonable to quit your day job. If your freelance business simply cannot grow because you have absolutely no time left during to day to take on more freelance work, and you're ...


2

Place an advertisement in traditional venues (Online/newspapers). You aren't going to just stumble upon someone. You will have to seek them out, or ask them to contact you then vet them yourself. In my experience, looking for people online with a specific skill set simply results in a lot of wasted time due to many thinking they can do a job they can't. ...


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