28

I simply state, "Sorry. Pricing is set and rates are non-negotiable." I haven't run into an instance where that offended anyone. I may not get the work but, if they won't pay my rates, I don't see that as a problem. You aren't required to explain anything to clients in terms of your business structure or calculations. Actually going into too much detail is ...


10

Step 1 is to protect yourself with a clear scope of work. Write up a clear, concise scope of the work you are performing. Include not only the work being performed by also what is NOT being performed. These are called exclusions. Your scope should also include the price of the project, that billings will be done monthly on the XX day of the month and are ...


10

Simple, either raise their pricing or drop the client. It's business. There's little point in working even a few hours for less money than you could earn with another client. Businesses typically do not provide individual pricing merely because you've been doing business with them for a while. Hi [client], As of [Month day year] pricing for my ...


9

First you say this: He told me he was glad to have had the interview because he ended quite happy whith me. Nevertheless there were still four more interviews and he had to finish them all. I hate to break the news to you, but I am fairly confident he said that to each candidate. A week later he sent me an email telling me I wasn't hired. And ...


8

If I received the same call and the client started barking requests at me before I could even figure out to whom I was speaking, I think I'd become a bit defensive. I think it's always important, as a creative professional, that you're able to engage with the client at a certain pace. My "pace" includes: Who are you? What line of business are you in? What ...


8

Free??? No, no, no. The client has already indicated that they're looking to save a buck. Now, pose this question: how does the work that you've already been doing suddenly become worth less money per hour??? Where I'm going with this is to point out that if the client needs the services you have to offer, they'll find some way to get the money to spend ...


8

Any combination of: A) We can certainly set this up as a [fixed bid/hourly contract] instead if that makes it easier for you. B) Projects with unique requirements will, of course, entail negotiation. For the scope we've discussed [our standard price applies/I've already applied the appropriate discount of X from our base price]. C) No. D) If there's ...


8

Don't do it. Clearly they don't value your work, a 60% discount is what you ask for haggling in a North African marketplace, not development work with a freelancer. And keep in mind that although they ask 60% discount, they will still demand 100% dedication, quality and timeliness. Also, after a while you will definitely start to resent the low rate which ...


7

If you two have no contract, then what is he breaching? on the other hand, the mutual understanding is valid in front of the law. I'd say that he was not acting correctly, from what you wrote. He should have given you more tasks. And if not being satisfied, he should have told you that. So if this comes to the arbitration, I'd say that email are enough of ...


7

I've been a designer for over 25 years, there has never been any reason for me to ever work for free at the request of someone I didn't know. Ever. Yes I've worked for free for family or friends, but never random clients. Would your plumber install a new sink as a "test" to see if you like their work? Would an electrician wire a new outlet for you as a "...


7

First off, charge by the hour. Without knowing a great many details about your expectations for payment, level of skill, customer expectations, graphics, whatever, it's impossible to come up with an accurate estimate that is going to make you happy. Here's the deal though...you are in the same position. Fixed price gigs almost always (in my 30 years of ...


7

He said he wanted to talk about the website. We agreed to contact again the week after to fix a meeting date and hour. This didn't exactly happen, did it? You drove across town, and back, to sit with this guy for twelve minutes. He didn't care at all about your time. But what's worse is that instead of going down a course - prescribed by you - of getting ...


7

I think you know the answer to this, but may be a bit apprehensive about losing the client if you fail to attend these meetings. That's always a possibility. It's your business. Your pricing and what you will or will not do for that pricing, is your decision, never a clients. No client can make any meeting mandatory for you. Now, a client can require ...


6

Peter MV's got some good points. State your rate. But bump it up a little higher than what you're really looking for. If the client doesn't complain, GREAT! If the client does complain, knock your price down - a little at a time - until the client is satisfied, but of course don't go lower than what you were really looking for in the first place. This ...


6

Having been down this path before, here are some thoughts: Resume Since you are not an established contractor and likely can not share any work from your current employer, your resume is the next best thing to show to the company that you are qualified to do the work. While your brother may have vouched for you, the managers involved will need to see ...


6

For large projects I always do monthly billings to the client plus a prepayment before starting the project to pay initial costs. It is perfectly OK to do like that, it is a mutual responsibility. If you ask a single payment only at the end you will give a "weapon" that will make the client blackmail you if you don't do all his changes and requests, just ...


6

Every one of us has come to this point. In my case, at some point when I got "too many" clients, I started filtering them on those keep working and those that simply take my time. I sent circular email to all of them informing them that in 6 months my rate will increase and will be XYZ dollars. I found this fair as this gives them time to find someone else ...


6

Why do you allow being treated like this? "Calling me every 2h and messaging every 15min + threatening" - WFT bro???? I would never, NEVER, N E V E R allow being treated like this. Now, aside of this, the client obviously wanted a lot of free work and he found fertile ground to impose his requests for free. At this point, you only have 2 options: break ...


6

No matter how you present it, that is blackmail. And I very much doubt a bank did not let you sign an NDA which prohibits you from using this data elsewhere. Fixed price is exactly what the name implies: fixed price. What you can do is create an overview of the work and costs and propose a new compensation, while not in any way holding back on delivering ...


6

In 5 years of working with this client, your skill level has probably increased: you definitely do the same job faster than 5 years (and even a year) ago and most likely you do your job better. This (and not graduation itself) should be the main argument in the negotiations. Your client can now get from you per each hour more than before, and therefore it is ...


5

The doctor can't unilaterally modify the terms of your original agreement. Your agreement gives you both the option of using one anothers' services, with no specific mention of cash compensation. You've exercised your option, but the doctor has not. It's that simple. There's no breach but there is a little funny-business going on here. The doctor can ...


5

Never ever bill by the hour. It's inherently unethical, and you're leaving money on the table. I've written extensively on the rationale, which I won't post here, but you can read it here. Summary: I’ve found the biggest problem a consultant will encounter is a client who is unable to articulate value. You have to help the client understand the difference ...


5

I always provide a hard number and never a range - but that comes down to my weakness as a haggler. Instead I prefer more or less stating a price as an ultimatum. When I quote a range, I feel I seem less confident and therefore vulnerable to being bullied. So I try to do the 'bullying' myself. Generally, I try to postpone giving a price quote as much as ...


5

If someone would ask me a 60% discount off my hourly rate it would be offensive to my worker's dignity. I would not even keep up a telephone conversation with someone like that. I would consider a 5%-10% discount on large or long term project (0% on small projects), only when I know I can optimize the work processes and that will not cause loss of income ...


5

Ah, the good old fashioned "stuff works and never breaks" assumption from a non-it manager. First up, DBA requirements. Advise them that if they do not wish to procure DBA support from you, they will need to provide their own DBA. Ensure that your terms of service/sla/etc do not include DBA support as part of the package. Next, general support ...


5

Well from what I can see, you are a good photographer and you have more work than you can handle. So this is a good position for expansion. The same happened to me in the programming field. Declining a long-term client is never a good idea. Especially if a client is paying you your price and if he's a good client. So bringing another man to a team is a way ...


5

It sounds to me like he treated your interview as if he was interviewing a potential new employee, rather than interviewing a freelancer. He most likely wanted to meet you and get a feel for you as an individual. Think about his job; he's the CEO of a car dealership. Most of his employees are salespeople, so he's probably used to hiring people based on his ...


4

Regardless of a person is known or unknown, you should do like in any project. You connect with it, discuss all details, give your estimation, set milestones, take upfront (or not) and start working. But you are probably asking about situations where you do all tasks until the estimation, and the clients says you're too expensive. Because of this, it is ...


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