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8

Unless your contract specifically states that you own all rights or the right to resell/redistribute the work... then NO you do not have the right to resell or redistribute anything under any circumstance. If you do not have rights, then adding a "credit" is meaningless. However, a contract can stipulate that reselling or distributing is permissible if a ...


4

Obviously, the following is not legal advise, but just some general advise from a seasoned freelancer / consultant: It looks like your client is right in demanding a partial refund, given that you promised to deliver in accordance with the specifications. If you don't give them a refund, they can send you an arbitration demand and they'll basically sue you, ...


3

Yes, but it's all in how you phrase it. When I was with [Marketing Company X], I assisted clients such as Nike, Reebok, Adidas, Puma. vs. I've worked with Nike, Reebok, Adidas, Puma. While it's a fine line, and most won't really care. There is a different connotation if you were employed by someone and worked with clients compared to directly working ...


2

Regardless of what services you provide to your clients, you should invest in Professional Liability Insurance and General Liability Insurance, or their equivalents. Will I be held responsible? You might very well be held responsible. It is your code after all. What if there is a lot of money involved? should I pay for the damages? You might very ...


2

If you are already in the middle of the project, you need to decide if it's worthwhile bringing up a "formal" agreement then, or at the end. The agreement does not need to necessarily contain all the details you would present in an initial agreement (i.e. milestones). It can be as simple as "I, Nil, hereby grant all rights to work performed by September ...


1

The legal ramifications depend on the contract - assuming there is one. However, I would concentrate on the relationship you have or wish to establish with the agency. Since you state you are a new employer, I'm assuming there's no long time bond worth keeping - so you basically just want to pay as little as possible, regardless of what the future ...


1

Although you've agreed to fix bugs or other defects, that doesn't necessarily make you liable for the damage caused by those defects. The Mozilla Public License, which you're using for your code, includes terms to help protect the code's contributors and distributors against liability: * 7. Limitation of Liability ...


1

Is the client entitled to a refund? Yes! This should not even be a question. As a professional it is your duty to deliver what you promise. It will look like fraud if you agreed to do something you knew you weren't capable of and refuse to give a refund. How much of a refund? Depends. If the client originally prioritized these as being more important ...


1

It would look like a bad deal. You're basically saying that your friend believes the code has great value but that he's not being paid what it's really worth so even tho he's selling the code outright he needs some of it back to try and milk it for what it's really worth later on. That doesn't make sense. He should either ask for the right price or only ...


1

This very much depends what you mean by "hired". If you did this as an employee (which I assume you did not) then you should work out a real license which clearly states what you could and could not do with the code. If you did the work as a freelancer take a look at How to combine the general advantages of "work for hire" and retain my right for ...


1

I personally don't like sites that are nothing but click traps so just having "5000 clicks per day" alone seems a bit shallow to me. If your content is good and you get a lot of visitors that way you should maybe start to monetize your content. One way to do this is to participate in an affiliate program. Or - if your content is really unique - you could ask ...


1

Create an online presence (ex: FB Page, Website, Behance Profile, etc. to showcase your work) Start by serving people you know how have design requirements and ask them to leave testimonials for your service. Use Social Media and other avenues to spread your freelancer profile/portfolio, and land jobs/clients. Don't worry about your age, don't mention it if ...


1

First, check your agency contract, the non-competition clause(s) likely include language around 'new/future business with the client', in which case setting up a competing agency is probably a conflict. If your agency agreement does allow it, you would be managing the (legal and business) relationship with the end client for anyone you propose, so they ...


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