3

Just very bad business on your part. I understand supporting family and everything. However, doing business with family is always a bad idea. The closer you are to family the worse the idea becomes. You've set things up so you won't EVER be profitable. Either just do it for free or "whatever and whenever" he feels like paying you - realizing you may never ...


2

If I understand well what you're proposing, you want to charge a monthly fee to give your costumer the commitment that you will fix some kinds of problems he might have, i.e. "crashes for any non self-inflicted reason". That is basically a specific kind of support contract, widely adopted in the field, and there's nothing wrong with the idea, I just don't ...


2

This is a complicated area and the answers vary from state to state in the US also the contracting firm paying you on the 1099 might have there own idiosyncrasies based on the state where they are incorporated, or the municipality where the contract client is located, or just stuff that happened to them in the past. I don't know much about Connecticut I can ...


2

This is normal in the UK freelancing market and I am used to having to provide these as part of the onboarding process. The full details are not always asked for as some just want to see cover exists, but personally I wouldn't be unhappy to provide the full documents as they are pretty standard for most providers and freelancers. As @Daniel notes it is ...


2

As it can be expected that you do not have the private funds to cover the extend of your professional liability, this is actually quite normal and reasonable. I used to limit my liability to the amount covert by my insurance and guarantee the client that such an insurance was existent in my standard contract. Great advertising also: "A limited liability ...


2

I have no direct experience, but what if something happens to one of the dogs? Escapes, gets run over? In such situations it would seem that insurance would be important to cover your liabilities but also be useful for your customers' piece of mind. Also, what if one of the dogs causes damage to a third party? It seems insurance for that would also be very ...


2

You'll need an insurance but only if you're dealing with large businesses, and the amount of the contract is significant. That's generally reserved for an agency. If you're just working as a causal programmer, mostly likely not. Upworks jobs are small; serious and large jobs won't goto the open market. Those large jobs might require an insurance, but you ...


1

You should start reducing your dependency for business on your brother or any other family member. The thumb rule is never to sell or provide service on credit to your family members, you will eventually be the last one to be paid and will always be doubted for the product or services you sold. There are several articles written in popular business magazines ...


1

Agreed. Your brother's situation will eat at you over time when you could spend the same hours working on your own book of business. Start branching out to find small businesses with the money to pay for your work then your brother will see that you're worth more than what he's offering.


1

In my neighborhood there are many urgent-care providers who accept cash. I've seen prices from $50 to $125. This will get you through the easy stuff - flu, ear infection, pink eye, maybe (as a male, I can't vouch for this) female concerns -- the low hanging fruit. Hospitals will take cash! I think many hospitals bump up their prices as a way to finance ...


1

This is really a relative question considering the concept of insurance, what country you're doing business in, what your local licensing and business laws require, etc., but to try to give you a rough idea, the TL;DR is basically NO, you do not require it, nor, in my opinion, do you even really need it. However, UpWork has an alternative argument posted on ...


1

I'd say that you should be careful about sending the full document. An unscrupulous client may be trying to figure out how to get a free paycheck. Turn over this type of information on a specific need-to-know basis.


1

You will not get one for online work in that way, or if you do it will be expensive. You do not need one if you do not have employees, you visit customers at their premises, and your terms and conditions specifically say you are not responsible for any adverse affects or losses incurred with down time, bugs, problems with your online work etc and that the ...


1

Don't, go to an accountant. Go to an affordable one, or go on a one-time consult or whatever option you have to save money on this but you really do need professional advice. If you get this wrong, it will cost you a lot more.


1

Contractor insurance is a basic requirement for working as a freelancer where I work (EU). Most of the contracts I get specifically mention they expect to me have contractor insurance. It costs around 500-700 euros though, certainly not thousands. The reasoning for the insurance is: if I give incorrect advice, or create something which is used and then ...


1

For my small business - doing software development - I forked out about $1000/yr for just general liability and professional liability. Your mileage may vary. The quote shouldn't take a week, though. Something seems "off" to me.


1

Your National Insurance contributions is calculated on total taxable income. The source of the taxable income is irrelevant - thus I suspect its likely you'll have to contribute more National Insurance, though I also suspect its so small that its not worth worrying about. Call your local tax office and ask them - I've had a UK Limited Company in the UK for ...


1

I've done freelance software contracting since 1982 and only get Bus. insur. when client asks for it. I have never heard of a programmer being sued. Unfortunately, over last few years, Bus. Insur rates have gone way up. Be careful what you tell an insur. company. Certain keywords are red flags: like automotive. I said automotive, and they practically ...


1

I have not had a "company" ask me anything about my insurance before. But every time I've proposed work for a government agency (A city or county in California) they have required insurance. Sometimes they will waive it. Sometimes not. But it's not as high as what this company wants of you. (Are you driving a truck for them? The high automobile insurance ...


1

This is quite a strange request honestly. It is even stranger if you have a proper corporation/LLC that you have established. As a 1099 (sole proprietor) contractor, some of this could be attempting to force you to have the same insurance as the employer. There are a few things that I can think of as to why they require this level of insurance : They ...


1

My husband was required to do this when he was an independent TV installation contractor for Sears. Considering what your job entails, the insurance will not be terribly expensive (because you aren't doing any physical activity that is prone to on-the-job accidents). I have also (as a tech writer contractor) had a liability insurance requirement when ...


1

Do you host the website on your hardware? If not, then don't offer the insurance. What do you want to insure the client against? Maybe you better sign some agreement where you two will set your reaction time if something bad happens, and the client will pay monthly fee.


1

You can send a letter detailing the conversation, date, time, persons, questions etc, where disputed clauses were said to be "not actionable" and that she signed 'under pressure of the explanation'. Send it by registered mail so you have receipt of delivery. Once on record they have two choices a) accept the letter or b) dismiss the lady. I would advise not ...


1

I would draw a line through any terms that are not agreeable and just say NO to the times that are not agreeable. If they need it signed by Monday they can accept the black lined copy. Otherwise, they can renegotiate and wait. This is probably a standard contract that they try to get everyone to sign, though it may have been deliberately manipulative to ...


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