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13

Unethical people can be unethical completely regardless of any payment structure. Pricing high does not instantly make someone unethical. Perhaps that price for the three week project is accurate even though experience allows the work to be done faster. There are simply too many variables here to answer in any sort of definitive manner Here's a scenario......


7

Charge your normal rate - because, as you say, it prevents you from doing other work. Clients generally accept they're buying your time - so having varying rates could potentially open up a whole new can of worms. Keeping it simple with one rate for your time seems the best option for both parties as it enables more smooth collaboration.


6

Short version: the easiest way to bill ethically, is to match what you're selling. Longer version: My product is very clearly my time. Clients hire me to build custom web applications, and many times the specifications around that are very fluid (and they should be), so the client is really purchasing my time to work with them refining and building their ...


6

I have use both hourly billing and flat fee billing. I used to always favour hourly billing on the basis that I felt it was more ethical, but soon changed my mind about this. The main reason for my change of mind is that time is not always a valid reflector of the value of the work done, e.g.: A job might take longer but contain more repetitive unskilled ...


5

Here's what I did, and you can tweak it as you need it. I sent out a letter (using postal mail, even for my local clients), explaining that the rates have increased for new clients, and my current clients are keeping the same rate for the next 90 days. I explained that after 90 days, the rate will be increased to the same amount new clients are paying. If ...


5

First, there is certainly no universal answer to this. There are many factors, and a fair amount of them have little to do with your work itself, and more to do with your goals, tolerance to risk, etc. I have fear that high hourly rate could reduce work/project consistency. I think in your case, that's your answer. Since you're billing hourly (which is ...


4

It's up to you and there is no concrete answer to this question. Yes, you may be working for cheap money for months, but it could also be that $10 per hour is the top for your quality/expertise. You will never know if you don't try to increase. Put all calcs on the paper. Would you earn more money working for one rate or another? If you will earn equally ...


4

A retainer is a set monthly fee for you to take charge of a service or for responding to and fixing/repairing/updating/sorting your customers' issues/problems/changes out. An hourly rate is where you add up your time spent per week (say) and invoice them per hour. The benefit for the customer of a retainer is that they know what your role is (as specified ...


3

There are a few solutions to this dilemma. 1 - If your platform allows it, you can answer to the client without specifying an amount in your answer. This way, you avoid being discarded on price only and it gives you a chance to prove your skills and communication abilities to the client. 2 - I found that if the client is looking for really low hourly rates,...


3

He should get paid for the 4 hours work he did. The 10 hours a week probably means UP TO 10 hours a week, not definitely 10 hours every week. So if he works 4 hours 1 week and 0 hours the next week, he should get paid for the 4 hours the first week, and get paid nothing for the second week. The third hour he may have more work to do or not, depending ...


3

To be honest, I don't understand the quandary here. If you are working 40 hours a week, invoice for 40 hours a week for a client. If you are not working 40 hours per week for a client, invoice for the time you are working. Or are you asking if it's okay to invoice for 40 hours when you aren't actually working 40 hours? If that is the actual question, then ...


2

In the words of Clint Eastwood in The Unforgiven... "Deserve's got nuthin ta do wit' it'" You can't express to a client that they should pay more because you feel you are worth it. That's just poor negotiating. Emotion has little or nothing to do with financial negotiations, or at least it shouldn't. Pleas for more money because you "think you are worth it" ...


2

A retainer is a way for a client to book (reserve) you for a certain amount of hours per week or month in case something urgent comes up in his project. He will pay you monthly reservation whether you worked for him or not. Also when he comes to you asking to do something, you do it immediately. Retainer is good stable source of income. Bad side is ...


1

Go with the daily rate if you can do it that way. You will earn more. However, I think that the client will propose hourly rate for both things. Now, about the hourly rate, it's impossible to tell how much to charge. Even if you and me are from the same town, we would not charge the same. So just do what other freelancers do: count your costs and add ...


1

Yes you do bill. For a ten minutes delay, it is unreasonable to expect that you can switch to another activity.


1

Were you working from your own system where you allowed the update? Then No. Were you on the client's system and they had it set up to update automatically? Then yes. For 10 minutes I would. I would also inform the client. If something happened that was taking a lot longer I would try to let the client know what was going on as soon as it started ...


1

Absolutely not if the update was not crucial for this project! As always, we should not do updates during the productive phase. I personally always do updates on my non-productive machine first. But even then, I have been "out of business" for a few days because Google messed up something with its updates. Could I really charge 24 work hours to my client ...


1

Since we are coming from the same region, I may be able to reply as I am familiar with economic circumstances in the region. As Stacey said, there is no magic number. You can put $50 per hour if you think you are so good. But with 9 months of experience, you are still a Junior. If you bid via freelancing websites, I would go with $10 per hour and increase ...


1

There are multiple approaches to this. 1) You start working at lower hourly rate, then after some time, you talk to the client and tell him that you would like to increase your hourly rate since you've proved yourself. The risk here is that he will refuse it and you will have to finish the project with small rate. This is true if you work via rating ...


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