Hot answers tagged

109

I absolutely understand what you mean. A couple of years ago I faced the same dilemma. No matter how low I bid, I could never get a project. But as of today if I bid on a project, 90% of the chances are that I will get it. Thanks to more than 110 Five Star Ratings. I was almost on the verge of giving it up but then someone gave me some advice which helped me ...


51

Since I work as both a contractor and employer, I will share my experience by combining both roles. Sometimes I have too little money for some project, so I'll tell the guys that I am seeking someone good who needs experience. Try to look for such jobs. Apply by telling how much experience you have and how you plan to finish the job. Seek for smaller jobs ...


22

Not a direct answer, but hopefully a helpful one. I've found most of those sites to be impossible to book work from. I tried it for a few months and just gave up after awhile. Most of the freelancers on those sites are working at dirt cheap hourly rates, sometimes as low as 5.00/hr. Not sure where you are or type of quality of life you expect, but I know I ...


21

Well you cannot just put freelancing since it says nothing to your future employer. Employers don't care whether you worked as a freelancer or in multimillion company. They care only how much you know and how much extra profit you can bring to his company. Having this in mind, I would make a list of all project I did in 4 years, describing each technology ...


17

The pain train I was in the same boat as you for a while; I had ample experience over a few years where I worked on open source projects and websites for small-scale clients. The easiest way to actually have freelancing on your CV? Put it there as previous work, and have some of your clients be references. It's as simple as that. As for the question of "...


12

Most of these sites have a reputation based system, meaning that your chances of being hired are drastically increasing as you complete more jobs. Generally, from the client's point of view he has two choices: To hire an expensive freelancer with great reputation To hire a cheap freelancer with little or no reputation As a new freelancer on the site, you ...


12

I disagree with your premise. Most people who would hire a pet sitter care about their pets. Unbelievably low prices sends the message you aren't that good, or may have nefarious intentions. People who care about their animals won't risk it. Price will be a factor in their decision, but it probably won't be the main one. So don't set your prices ...


11

I asked the same question myself 4-5 years ago when I started freelancing. I will tell you what I did and how can you NOT make the same mistakes as myself. Since I will not do marketing for any freelancing site, I will not mention a specific names (and recommending would also be against the rules of this group). I first used Google to see which freelancing ...


7

We had luck sending very personal customized proposals. We do iOS apps, and have found a lot of the (cheaper) competition uses a very cut-and-paste system of submitting proposals to EVERYTHING. We have had several people thank us for actully reading their full job descriptions and responding appropriately. Good luck!!


7

I recommend you start by doing a Google/Bing search for the term "crowdsourcing" and see what shows up at the top of the organic search results - not the ads. Then perform another search of the site you're interested in joining, including certain keywords like "scam, ripoff, spam, lawsuit, etc...". If a site is shady, it usually shows up in search. Keep in ...


6

Put it this way. If you're charging $5/day when the going rate is $25/day ( I don't know the rates ), somebody's gonna think you're stupid. If they've spent good money on a pet, why would they want to trust their investment with somebody stupid? I'm NOT calling you stupid. You have costs involved. Is the owner providing food? Other materials? You'll ...


6

I don't know about the legality of soliciting business at the bus or train station. But I think you are on the right track by thinking about: Who would purchase my services, and Where can I find those people Some other suggestions: Connecting with the concierge service of some hotels that might get the customers interested in your service (probably not ...


6

Cover letter for freelancing?? Never heard of such a thing. You need marketing materials - a sales pitch, a brochure, a web site, a flier, an email campaign - but it's nowhere near the same as applying for an employment position. I've never needed a "cover letter" for any freelance work. I'd also point out that "self studying and training" has no place ...


5

A detailed, personalized project proposal is a big plus, and was what got me over the hump of getting the first job on a freelance site. Be as specific as possible about how you would tackle the project and attach a sample of your work that is relevant to the project. It is a lot more work for each proposal, but it is more likely to be successful than a ...


5

Absolutely, it's allowable to get help with projects! But you take on a different type of role, depending on the project: the Project Manager. First off, decide if you really need someone else coming on, and taking money from you. Yes, they may make you lots more money, but many people want to hire people for the lowest possible rate; can you accept that ...


4

@Avonelle & @codenoire both have good answers. Here's one more suggestion to add to the mix. Get a partner/salesperson. This person will be the "face" of your business. They will go out and find the pet sitting gigs for you. You would then pay them a percentage of the gig. This person could even explain to the clients how you are such an animal ...


4

Try seeking out smaller-scale projects, particularly projects that require a higher-level of expertise. Choose projects that you have specific experience on. These might be as small as a few hour or few day projects. Be sure to mention your prior experience with software and the specific task at hand in your PMB.


4

I would definitely advise you to start building reputation. You can usually link to your blog or web from freelancing sites. And that should contain free know-how, that will show that you know your stuff. You can describe tricky challenges you solved with attention to quality of the app or reusability. You can demonstrate that you do take into account user ...


4

Unlink the projects you have worked in and your employment history. Make two sections in your résumé: Projects, This should include side projects and everything that you consider relevant evidences to prove your qualifications. List technical details, e.g. development tools and platforms you have used (and supposedly you're familiar with). Indicate your ...


4

I hire on UpWork, so can answer this from the other side of the equation. As a general rule, 80% of applicants will send generic applications that may as well come from a robot. By sending personal replies that are specific to the job you're bidding on, you are already 'winning'. The one single thing that has made the biggest impact for me on software ...


3

If the money you're making from your current clients will support you financially, and you're confident that they'll continue to consistently provide you with work, then it's reasonable to quit your day job. If your freelance business simply cannot grow because you have absolutely no time left during to day to take on more freelance work, and you're ...


3

"Junior developer with 2 years experience in C++. Actively improving my PHP skills. Highly motivated to tackle Web projects." Cite one or more achievements you are proud of.


2

One (non-foolproof) method I use is, whenever I come across a new freelancing site, I search for site_name scam on Google. You have to be very discriminating for this to work though: every single site is going to have pages that say they're scammers. You can ignore the complaints are about scammers within the site (i.e. clients who are scammers), as that's ...


2

I don't have much experience with this but here's a few of my thoughts: Try and work out a figure in your head that you would be happy with I assume you have an accountant? they may be able to help you value the business based on a formula. All of the nuances you raise above are exactly why companies are sometimes very hard to value - just look what ...


2

Thank you for being so honest. This the first question I read on Freelancing, after answering many questions on StackOverflow. It is refreshing to read this. I personally do not believe you need "help" to do anything you want to do. Maybe some books... but you have an amazing advantage I mention below. My local veterinary clinic has a young man in it who ...


2

Why can't you work any more? I have 3 kids and I can still work full-time freelancing. Obviously, you want to work less and earn the same or more as before. The only answer is to make a company. Or maybe an agency and take a percentage for each project. The cheaper option is to have your own men, but you must have projects each month. The less to earn is ...


2

Matlab is good for fleshing out system performance and designing system mockups prior to prototyping. It is NOT viable for production systems. Matlab is really good for the following: Imaging problems/systems Control systems and design (simulink) DSP, filters, and linear systems Physical optics and light propagation Matlab is ok for: Machine learning/...


2

I think you need to find a balance, which can be easier said than done. No doubt, your earlier routine may have worked at one time, but when you get older you have more commitments, and different interests. Your motivation at the time was paying bills and becoming a really good dev. Im guessing with experience you earn more money and you dont need to pull so ...


1

You absolutely should go freelance! It sounds like you have been successful as a part-time freelancer, and have tested out whether you would like it or not. If you currently have 1 or 2 clients that are consistently giving you work, I would say go for it.


1

I expect that your business has no value (apart from cash in the bank), as without you, it cannot generate income. Your repeat customers come back to you, not to your business. So I think you are just asking what value you bring to them by working for them.


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