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6

I don't know about the legality of soliciting business at the bus or train station. But I think you are on the right track by thinking about: Who would purchase my services, and Where can I find those people Some other suggestions: Connecting with the concierge service of some hotels that might get the customers interested in your service (probably not ...


5

I wouldn't be so affirmative about "you didn't assume liability" on the grounds that nobody signed a contract. There has been pre-contractual discussions and work was performed based on these discussions, under mutual agreement, so technically speaking the commercial agreement was established, and "by default" rules will hold. Anyway, being sued for such a ...


4

The rules in (and therefore the required answer for) Canada are probably different from the UK, but this answer gives my experience from a UK perspective, and will hopefully be of help. Obviously, you will be becoming an employee of another company - but there is nothing to stop you remaining an employee of your own company too. In the UK, payroll taxes ...


4

The particular break even point from Sole Proprietorship to Corporation depends on your personal circumstances but tends to be at around the 40-60K / year point. Talk to an accountant. Be aware that having a corporation also takes more time, from the time to set one up with a lawyer to the added time handling accounting (even if you are working with an ...


4

There is no tax. GST does not apply to sales of Intangible Personal Property to customers outside of Canada. Section 10.1 of Part V of Schedule VI of the Excise Tax Act received Royal Assent on June 22, 2007, and zero-rates all supplies of intangible personal property (IPP) made to non-residents that are not registered for GST. There are, however, ...


2

As the contributions are paid on your self-employed income (if any) from a corporation I was wondering why would you have to pay them? No self-employed income - no contributions. You'd still have to file payroll forms/reporting though for the corporation. Your full-time employer will deduct and pay CPP/EI contributions on your salaried income. Disclaimer: ...


2

Firing yourself just means suspending/cancelling your payroll account, which is a simple phone call. A corporation is a little bit expensive (bank fees + annual report filing cost), but not as expensive as making a new one if your situation changes in less than 7-8 years.


2

If you're like most freelancers, and have a handful of clients or less, then you likely have a pretty keen sense of who has paid you vs. what is still outstanding. Receivables are a source of much anxiety for the self-employed. So, assuming you got paid for the work, then all of your recent bank deposits – except for one! – should match up with ...


2

Personally, I would use the rate I am paid. If I charge $100/hr, and through a service like oDesk, I'm paid $90/hr, I'd report as $90/hour. They are not taking off taxes, so I don't say I made $100/hr. They are an expense from before you get your gross income. The CRA will care more for the money you are actively making, as oDesk has their own tax ...


2

This is a common technique that some people do, in order to show their income level as low, but still having lots of income. When you set your company up as a sole proprietor, you can treat it like a separate entity. Actually, you should! You are taxed less as a company, then as an individual. The goal here is that you are paying less taxes overall, and ...


2

I guess if you plan to get paid during that time, you may have some problems if you open an account there. You should check with your bank the options. Also, if you use paypal, there are some restrictions about receiving money in different countries. However, this could also be seen as working remotely. For instance, if you work from home and your client is ...


2

I'm a Canadian and I've freelanced (in the advertising field) for a UK-based company. They had a Toronto office that I dealt with for the project and cheques were issued locally so that simplified things. And because this company had an office on the ground in Canada, yes, I had to charge HST. However, you do not charge GST/HST if the company has no ...


2

Work orders and invoices are contracts. Documents detailing the agreed upon work to be done and payment for that work. Work orders define the scope of work and the invoice defines the terms of payment. You should have costs on the work order if you don't already. Listing your liability on work orders and dispute resolution terms on invoices is a good idea ...


2

The place where you are working from does not impact your current projects, the only problem you should have in mind is if you prospect new clients in the US, you need to warn them that you are Canadian, and you will provide the receipt from Canada, not from US. Furthermore, if you are in the country for pleasure, try to keep it that way, only work in your ...


1

Contractor insurance is a basic requirement for working as a freelancer where I work (EU). Most of the contracts I get specifically mention they expect to me have contractor insurance. It costs around 500-700 euros though, certainly not thousands. The reasoning for the insurance is: if I give incorrect advice, or create something which is used and then ...


1

As long as you have the required information to for your tax records, and other record keeping requirements, any invoice format is accepted. The basic requirements are the contractor's name, the date and the amount. If you are registered for GST/HST, there will be additional requirements based on the amount of the invoice. Here is a link to the details: ...


1

You pay a lot of taxes that are not linked 1-on-1 with a single job, so you'll never get an exact number for that. However, as a freelancer I use a very simple calculation that works accurate enough so far (the same might exist for Toronto): taking ALL taxes into account, basically 50% of what I invoice is NET, i.e. if I take all my revenue at the end of ...


1

As a freelancer, you may be the only person in your business and likely still need to be checking and responding to emails and maybe doing other tasks while you travel. I'm not qualified to provide specific visa advice but I doubt this will be an issue during short stays (e.g. a few weeks) on a tourist visa in any country you visit as long as you are ...


1

The first step is to start with time tracking. I would recommend ManicTime which has a variety of tools to manage and report on your time. http://www.manictime.com/ You will then need to use any of a large variety of accounting software to apply Canadian payroll and income tax regulations. This can be done in Excel or a custom application like Quickbooks. ...


1

If you have your HST/GST number, then you are required to collect tax as per normal. The issue comes in if you are making more than $30,000 per quarter, as you must then register and collect on future transactions [Source - CRA Mandatory Registration]. I would double-check with an accountant though as per the possible penalty if you aren't charging taxes yet,...


1

I would not dig myself into administrative things for such a small money and such a large number of clients. I sign contracts only where there is a good and long-term job where I want to bind the client not to make silly moves (like leaving me all of a sudden). Of course, the most important thing is what your Laws say. If they do not prescribe having ...


1

As Scott says, your work order is a contract and should probably include the scope of work, the payment and payment terms. When I was doing this type of work years ago, I would not start on a job until the client signed a form agreeing that they are responsible for their own data, that they have a current backup and that I cannot be held responsible for any ...


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