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I've been doing a small identity design job for a new client who has been very difficult to work with and he has recently stopped replying to my emails altogether.

The main problem is that trying to get any kind of constructive feedback from him is like pulling teeth.

The only feedback I could get is for him to say that my ideas are not what he 'envisioned'. However, in my opinion, the ideas I've produced are perfectly in-line with the moodboards I sent over originally (which he said he was happy with).

He also showed me some other brands that he liked the look of... which I'm pretty sure my ideas are in-line with also.

His total lack of feedback has made it very difficult to revise my ideas to his liking, I have been having to base a lot of them on pure guesswork which unsurprisingly hasn't worked out.

I was doing this job for a very fair price, I took 50% payment up front but I believe I am entitled for some, if not all, of the remaining payment.

He claimed to be happy with the logo (although seemed to keep changing his mind on this) but was mainly unhappy with the colour palette, despite my vast array of different colour combinations that I sent over.

Should I pursue it further or just put it behind me? and also, should I say he doesn't have the right to use the logo that he claimed to be happy with? (excluding the colour palette)

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    This is impossible to answer without knowing both sides of the story. I understand you feel your position is the correct position. However, it's not really possible to know the actual accounting of things. The clients' position could very well be "I told him/her I didn't like blue when we met initially... and everything I'm shown has blue in it." – Scott Apr 22 at 17:10
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Working in design, you have to ensure, ensure that the client is active and communicating in a detailed and descriptive manner what they desire. Otherwise it is like a nightmare, of constant redrafts.

You should be careful to value your time and yourself. Choosing clients, that are a good match, is a huge part of the job.

The client probably senses that the relationship is in his favor, and, that causes a loss of interest.

I was doing this job for a very fair price, I took 50% payment up front but I believe I am entitled for some, if not all, of the remaining payment.

First mistake: offer a good price for you, and if the client sees real value they will sign on.

He claimed to be happy with the logo (although seemed to keep changing his mind on this) but was mainly unhappy with the colour palette, despite my vast array of different colour combinations that I sent over.

Working in design requires drafts, and guidelines that the client signs. If you did not have anything in writing, it is a lost job.

Trust me, I know the hassle. Honestly, work with clients that communicate, contribute, and commit to the paperwork.

Drop your client and move on.

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    It looks like this answer simply re-states the OP's problem and stresses the need of communication. What is your suggested approach on solving the problem? – bytebuster Apr 24 at 8:39
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    The poiint was that yes she should drop the client. Sorry I didn't make it clear. – Julien Tremblay McLellan Apr 24 at 8:45
  • thanks, yeah seems like the only way to go about it really... there were a number of alarm bells early on in the project that I shouldn't have ignored - live and learn anyway! – pealo86 May 4 at 9:27

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