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My questions are for freelancers that have active twitter, blog or any other social platform that gives them good clients.

Does it worth to have an active twitter account, or constantly writing to your personal blog about technologies?

Are there any success stories that were possible only because of your twitter/blog account?

Could you share your insights on what works best for you?

Thanks

  • Blog, podcast, YouTube, FaceTweet, GitHub projects,a few freeware apps, perhaps; try to get them mentioned in periodicals, maybe even win an award. – Mawg Oct 1 '18 at 14:34
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    @Mawg thank you for your comment, but it's too broad in my opinion. You cant blog/podcast/youtube/tweet/GitHub in a significant way all at once + have a full-time job :) I'm asking about narrow approach with one of them, and would like to hear any success stories :) – Taier Oct 1 '18 at 17:24
  • There are two on my current team of ten who manage it. maybe you have to want it enough ;-) – Mawg Oct 2 '18 at 6:29
  • @Mawg Exciting! Could you share their profiles? :) – Taier Oct 2 '18 at 16:52
  • I would - if I had not said that they are on my team. But, since I don't share their desire for publicity, this account is anonymous & naming them would lead to me – Mawg Oct 2 '18 at 20:26
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IMHO (and I am an IT freelancer myself for 20+ years): No.

At least as long as you are looking for the "typical" IT projects, i.e. Linux-/Unix-Admin, JEE development, SCRUM master and the like. No coporate clients or recruiting agencies who recruite freelancers for coporate projects read tweets or wach your YouTube videos. They will only be interested in your CV.

In case you are looking for a differnet career as an independent speaker, author, advisor - you name it - the answer my be different.

I had been doing publication work (writing articles for well known IT publications back then) in the 90ies. It was fun, it was some money, but never ever did anyone call and say: I read your article, please could you do a project for me.

And don't underestimate the time it takes to do some meaningful publication work, no matter on what chanel. I found in my career that many bloggers / authors or conference speakers are employees in large corporations, public service or academics who ... let's say ... are not always under full utilization at work and can do these things on their employer's time.

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