1

I'm a year 11 student (Victoria, Australia) who typically excells at mathematics, science, etc. and have been asked to tutor a younger student in mathematics who is around average performance (C's), and get him up to a higher level (B's and A's).

I've only every tutored another student once before - two years ago, and was paid $20 per session for two half-hour sessions per week (amounting to $40.00 per hour). This seems like a lot, and I'm not really sure if I should ask for that much (the last time it was offered).

I have another two casual jobs, which both pay reasonably well, but take up a lot of my time - so it has to be worth my while to actually take on the student, however as mentioned I don't want to seem rude by asking for too much.

What I want to know is what are the things that I should consider when coming up with a reasonable price for this type of tuition?.

1

It seems you feel $40/hour is too much - even though you actually have been paid that? If your previous tutoring results were good, then surely the price is fine?

If the other casual jobs pay better, perhaps $40/hour is too little - especially if you actually have a good (albeit short) track record.

Other things to consider:

What would you rather be doing? The other casual jobs or the tutoring? Could the tutoring lead to more work - or is it really a one-off? Does the tutoring make you better at in school? Are the tutoring hours flexible - or must they always be Wednesday evening?

-- edit from comments --

An hourly rate often depends on the number of hours; the less hours - the higher the rate. In addition, if you need to negotiate - never just lower your price; you need to get something back - even if it's just symbolic, like flexible hours or more hours or perhaps bonus after a measurable result

  • Not so much that $40/h is too much, just that the parent/s might think so given that I've only ever done this once before. And yeah the results were good - the student went from around 15 or 20 percent test results to roughly 80%. Would that be enough of a selling point? I've seen online examples of uni students charging less than that ($30 - $35) which is making me a little cautious – Brad Sullivan Jun 8 '16 at 7:45
  • An hourly rate often depends on the number of hours; the less hours - the higher the rate. In addition, if you need to negotiate - never just lower your price; you need to get something back - even if it's just symbolic, like flexible hours or more hours or perhaps bonus after a measurable result – morsor Jun 8 '16 at 7:51
  • Ahh okay yeah - I'll probably be looking at 1.5 hours a week, so $40 wouldn't be too bad I suppose. That's good advice on the negotiating, thanks! – Brad Sullivan Jun 8 '16 at 8:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.