2

This is a hypothetical question. Generally bids on platform like Upwork revolves around the client budget. Suppose I got the job offer and during the job, I realized client is roughly paying me twice than the job is worth. So what should be done in such cases? Keep the whole money or offer to refund. I am interested esp. in case where client is a mid-sized profitable organization.

My argument against refunding are:

  1. In cases when I felt, I've under-bid than the job is worth, no client is going to give me extra money.

  2. Client is rich, so it won't affect him much.

  • I don't think you realize that the motivation to be in business is to make a profit. :( – Xavier J Nov 24 '15 at 19:00
  • @codenoire: motivation can be just to make a living. – Harry Cover Nov 25 '15 at 8:08
  • A refund is thinkable (but not so recommended). Don't expect that the client will be grateful. On the opposite, there is a risk that what the client will remember is that "something went wrong". – Harry Cover Nov 25 '15 at 8:13
4

What you are experiencing is the difference between value-to-the-client billing, and cost-of-supplier-inputs billing.

Do not refund. There is a set scope of work, and an agreed set fee.

| improve this answer | |
3

Pricing is subjective. And of course, overpricing is also subjective. In my opinion, there is not a problem if the client knows exactly what's being paid for. The problem begins when you start overpricing your product after the agreement with the client. We live in a free market environment and we are judged every day, as both sellers and buyers.

| improve this answer | |
1

Once you and client agreed then you should not change charges. Because think that now if you change price then what client will think. Sometime there will be positive impact and sometime it can put negative impact on client mind.

So for now do work on agreed changes , from next time you should take care while decide project task charge.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.