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I'm currently working on-site as a contractor in a bigger software project.

The client and I have closed a contract which run's until the end of the year. Now I've gathered from talking to coworkers that this project is expected to run much longer than that.

Unfortunately I already know that I will not be available next year to work on this project.

My questions is, when should I tell the project manager this? Right away? Only after they have asked to extend the contract?

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If the company is serious enough and professional, I would tell them ASAP since it's November already. They have to find someone to replace you + you have to train him and all of that has to be done before Jan 1.

So if they were OK with you, talk to the person in charge and inform them of your unavailability.

But for your sake, check the contract and what does it say about your decision. Maybe you cannot resign before the project is over.

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  • Thank you for your answer. The contract states that it will end at the end of the year but both sides can cancel at any further date (with a 2 weeks notice period). – daniel.herken Oct 28 '14 at 14:20
  • Ok so you have to give them 2-week notice. But if they are nice guys I would inform them next week. It's now really up to you. – Peter MV Oct 28 '14 at 14:28
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I'm taking the approach of what's written, and that the company knows what's going on.

If the contract ends December 31, and YOU feel it needs to be extended (whether by you or someone else), you should meet with the manager at least a month ahead of time for an update, and recommendation for going forward.

If they do not need to bring you back, you won't need to worry about mentioning it! Remember the old adage, "Poor planning on their part does not constitute an emergency on my part". You give them at least a month's notice to get someone else to finish (if that's how you feel it will go), but wait to see if they ask for you specifically.

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