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I started working for a media company as freelance production manager/video editor two months ago, and I just received a contract that doesn't explain anything but the pay I will earn per hour. The pay is decided by the company.

They will pay me at the end of the month every month, and the pay will be based on the number of the hours I'll work during the month.

I moved to the UK eight months ago, so I don't really know what to ask them to include in my contract.

  1. I work for this media agency that has different clients, and I do videos for them (but not directly, the agency gives me the videos and the tasks to do). So am I considered Freelance or Contractor by the law?

  2. Do I have to pay IR35?

  3. What should I ask to be included in my contract to protect my rights? For example, I'm still waiting, after one month, for my October pay.

  4. I mainly work from home, but sometimes I have to go on location to film or meet with the clients. Should I ask to include transportation/food expenses?

migrated from workplace.stackexchange.com Nov 30 '13 at 18:39

This question came from our site for members of the workforce navigating the professional setting.

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First question: Are you serious about this company and want to work there? If yes, then try to find a legal counsellor. He will best tell you what is the proper thing.

Now, the contract is not something made in stone. You can enter inside whatever you want and is valid if both sides put signature on it.

We can try to help you but it's all guessing.

1 & 2 - do not know

  1. Enter that you must receive payment by 5th in the month.If they limited number of work hours weekly, enter that as well. What ever they told you but did not put in the paper, write it yourself.

  2. Whenever you travel for business or for that company, they should pay you, especially when you have to meet clients. I am not sure about travelling from your home to their office.

I would suggest you find UK Labour law and read it. Such law in my country proscribes what are the minimum conditions each employee must have. UK is a strict country and I have no doubt they will stick to it.

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This is a good place to start : http://www.contractoruk.com/

I'd get the tax issues sorted out ASAP as HMRC have a tendancy to foot you with a big bill if you leave it for too long !

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